Brian May http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/991/all en 100 Greatest Guitar Solos: No. 20 "Bohemian Rhapsody" (Brian May) http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-20-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may <!--paging_filter--><p>“Freddie [Mercury] had the whole piece pretty well mapped out, as I remember, but he didn’t have a guitar solo planned," Queen's Brian May said. </p> <p>"So I guess I steamed in and said, ‘This is the point where you need your solo, and these are the chords I’d like to use.’ The chord progression for the solo is based on the verse, but with a slight foray into some different chords at the end, to make a transition into the next part of the song. </p> <p>"I’d heard the track so many times while we were working on it that I knew in my head what I wanted to play for a solo. I wanted the guitar melody to be something extra, not just an echo of the vocal melody. I had a little tune in my head to play. It didn’t take very long to record.</p> <p>“The next section of the song, the heavy bit, was really part of Freddie’s plan. I didn’t change what he had very much. Those guitar riffs that everybody bangs their heads to are really more Freddie’s than mine. And at the end of that section, I sort of took over. I wanted to do some guitar orchestrations—little violin lines—coming out of that. And it blended in very well with what Freddie was doing with the outro.</p> <p>“We were stretching the limits of technology in those days. Since ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ was entirely done on 16-track, we had to do a lot of bouncing as we went along; the tape got very thin. </p> <p>"This ‘legendary’ story, which people think we made up, is true: we held the tape up to the light one day—we’d been wondering where all the top end was going—and what we discovered was virtually a transparent piece of tape. All the oxide had been rubbed off. It was time to hurriedly make a copy and get on with it.”</p> <p><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/article/100_greatest_guitar_solos_19_quotfloodsquot_dimebag_darrell">Next: 19) "Floods"</a></p> <p><strong>Queen (studio):</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fJ9rUzIMcZQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Queen (live, 1986)</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/oozJH6jSr2U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Judas Priest guitarist Richie Faulkner (before Judas Priest):</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/rrFpfiyo1mw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Daryl Kellie:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_fxbx0-O8kY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Kelly Valleau:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2B7d_gjK3og" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>SktechShe:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aVx6cXf5Liw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-20-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may#comments 100 Greatest Guitar Solos Brian May Queen Features Sun, 19 Jul 2015 12:03:44 +0000 Guitar World Staff 1615 at http://www.guitarworld.com Brian May Discusses Queen's Greatest Moments http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-brian-may-discusses-queens-greatest-moments <!--paging_filter--><p>"Sorry, my head takes a little while to get into gear,” says Brian May with a little laugh as he begins to mull over the history of Queen. The 63-year-old guitarist speaks gently, endeavoring to answer questions as fully as he can. </p> <p>May’s academic air is understandable. As a younger man he attended London’s illustrious Imperial College until he abandoned his studies and a promising future in astrophysics to fully dedicate himself to Queen. The band’s estimated worldwide album sales vary anywhere from 150 to 300 million. </p> <p>Whatever the exact figure, it was certainly a smart career move for the budding cosmologist.</p> <p>In 1971, bassist John Deacon joined Queen, completing the lineup of May, drummer Roger Taylor and singer Freddie Mercury. Over the next two decades they would become the complete stadium rock act. Mercury expertly worked massive crowds backed by a concrete rhythm section that mixed flamboyance (Taylor) and willful anonymity (Deacon). </p> <p>May, instantly recognizable either by the sight of his trademark tower of curly hair or the unique tone of his homemade Red Special guitar, would mutter quietly to himself as he strove to perfectly deliver some of rock’s most memorable riffs.</p> <p>Grandiosity in all things applied very much to Queen’s parties. These notoriously depraved celebrations were typically staffed by half-naked girls, though disappointingly a well-worn anecdote involving dwarves with bowls of cocaine on their heads is entirely apocryphal. “I loved the social side of it and there was a lot of fun in doing things that no one had done before,” May says. </p> <p>“But there was a side of me that kept to myself, I suppose, and was much more private. Looking back on it, I think perhaps I was a little too much of an island, but on the other hand perhaps it kept me sane.”</p> <p>In 1991, at the age of 45, Freddie Mercury passed away due to AIDS-related bronchial pneumonia. Six years later John Deacon withdrew from public life, leaving May and Taylor—musical comrades since 1968, when they first played together in a group called Smile—to curate Queen’s legacy. </p> <p>This year marks the group’s 40th anniversary, and in celebration, Queen’s 15 studio albums are being released in remastered deluxe editions. “I’m quite excited, actually,” says May. “They’re a really lovely bit of work, I think. There are lots of little bits of rescue that have been done to bring these albums closer to the original vinyl experience. You know, when you first opened your LP and it had that particular smell. Unfortunately we can’t quite do the smell yet, but we’re trying to get as close as possible to that sound and that feel. It’s a fascinating project.”</p> <p><strong>What were your impressions of Freddie Mercury before he joined Queen?</strong></p> <p>An interesting and flamboyant character who seemed to be very confident, but it was soon apparent that he was very shy underneath all that stuff. Yeah, he was an unknown. Full of enthusiasm, full of energy and ideas. We had no idea if he could sing or not, really. When we actually did see him sing with his old band, I don’t think we felt that good about it because he was very over the top. Of course, that all changed very quickly when Freddie got into the studio and started to hear himself and fashion himself according to his desires. He was very astute at finding the best in himself.</p> <p><strong>Who did you have most in common with when Queen first got together?</strong></p> <p>MAY That’s complicated. Once we were all together we had quite a complex, sort of multiway interaction. That’s why it worked, really. I was very close to Roger in some ways because we’d already been in a band together. We are—and we were—kind of brothers. We were so close in our aspirations and the way we looked at music, but of course so distant in so many other ways. So like any pair of brothers we sort of loved and hated each other all along the line.</p> <p><strong>What was your relationship with Freddie like once he became a band member?</strong></p> <p>In a way, I was very close to Freddie, particularly in the songwriting area. In the beginning, it was only he and I that were writing the material, pretty much. We learned to interact in a very productive way without treading on each other’s toes. At its best it was a wonderful relationship, I must say. </p> <p>Some of my best times were producing a vocal out of Freddie, sort of coaxing him in various directions. A lot of the other best moments were Freddie doing the same for me the other way round, him saying, “Brian, why don’t you try this?” while I was doing the guitar solo. He loved what I did, which was very encouraging for me. He kind of saw me as his Jimi Hendrix, I think, which was very flattering for me. Most of my best guitar work was done on Freddie’s material because it was so inspiring. When it came to my own material, I was more concerned with the song.</p> <p><strong>When you learned that Freddie was dying did you want to continue recording?</strong></p> <p>Yeah. He loved recording, he loved being in the studio environment, and I think right up to the end that was his greatest escape. So it was his wish that we recorded right up to the very, very last moment. He was singing vocals when he couldn’t even stand. He’d prop himself up against the desk, knock a couple of vodkas down and go for it.</p> <p>The very last time we ever did that, me and him, was singing “Mother Love,” which is one of my favorite tracks on <em>Made in Heaven</em>. He never actually finished that. He said, “Oh, Brian, I can’t do any more. I’m dying here.” [laughs] It’s incredible, he never seemed to let it get him down. He was always full of humor and enthusiasm. He would make jokes about it, really.</p> <p><strong>Were those final sessions upsetting?</strong></p> <p>At the time, strangely enough, we developed such a great closeness as a band that they were quite joyful times. There was this cloud hanging over, but the cloud was outside the studio, it wasn’t inside. I have really great memories of those times. I think that we opened up to each other in a way that we hadn’t been able to before. For the first time we were actually writing songs absolutely as partnerships so, no…you know, the thing is there’s always a big element of disbelief. Y</p> <p>es, we knew the prognosis and we’d seen what happened to people with this horrible disease, but I don’t think we quite believed that it could happen to Freddie. We thought, No, something will happen, you know, somebody’s going to find a cure. He’s Freddie, after all. He’s invincible. So when the news finally came it was like a bolt from the blue. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/srkm4uZaTWU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Did you get a chance to say goodbye?</strong></p> <p>[sighs] That’s a hard question to answer. We were with him a lot in the final days, but it wasn’t a question of saying goodbye; it was a question of just sharing a moment. I remember a particular occasion when we were talking about his garden, because he was lying in bed and he couldn’t see out into his garden very well from where he was. We were talking about his plants, which he loved. </p> <p>Actually, Anita [May’s wife] and I were there. He said, “Guys, don’t feel like you have to talk to me. Just you being here is what’s important, and I’m enjoying that. So don’t feel like you have to entertain me.” So I think, in a way, that was him—amazingly—finding acceptance of the way things were. So, no, the word “goodbye” didn’t happen but we definitely reached a very peaceful place.</p> <p><strong>Did you have any idea that your 1986 Knebworth show would be the last time that Queen played live together?</strong></p> <p>No. Freddie said something like, “Oh, I can’t fucking do this anymore, my whole body’s wracked with pain!” But he normally said things like that at the end of a tour, so I don’t think we took it seriously, really. </p> <p><strong>Did “Bohemian Rhapsody” strike you as a peculiar song when Freddie first suggested it to you?</strong></p> <p>No, I don’t think so. You’ve got to bear in mind that we’d already made “My Fairy King” on the first album and we’d done “The March of the Black Queen” on the second album, so we were well in tune with Freddie’s excursions into strange areas, and that was something that we really enjoyed. </p> <p>I personally loved it when he’d come in with something off the wall, because there would always be something interesting for me to do on it. He’d be playing in Eb, which is always difficult for a guitar player, or F# or whatever, and I would enjoy the challenge of finding things that sounded good on the guitar that went with his piano playing. So I was intrigued. I thought, This is going to be a great thing to work on.</p> <p><strong>What’s your favorite riff to play?</strong></p> <p>Probably “Tie Your Mother Down.” People jump up when they hear it, which is a good feeling.</p> <p><strong>Being so highly educated, did you find that being in a band provided you with adequate intellectual stimulation?</strong></p> <p>That’s an interesting question. I suppose we were quite an intellectual group, so we would always have lots of discussions about things that weren’t music. The music itself is very challenging, so I’ve never really felt the lack of stimulation. I love to be creating, I love to be making things and solving problems, I suppose, and when I’m not, then I’m not an incredibly good person to be around. If I’m not busy then I think I would be disaster. That’s just the way things are.</p> <p><strong><em>Innuendo</em>, the last album that you recorded with Freddie, was released the same year as Nirvana’s <em>Nevermind</em> [1991]. Do you think that, had Freddie lived, Queen could have continued on the same level given the way that rock was heading in the Nineties?</strong></p> <p>It’s hard to say really. I’m sure we would have continued as a band. The fact that it continued without us being a band is incredible, so I suppose the answer would be yes. I mean, we seem to be as big as we ever were in much of the world. We revisited South America with Paul Rodgers a while ago and it was almost as big as it was in the old days. We were playing stadiums again. So yes, I think we would have still been doing what we did.</p> <p><strong>Do you ever think about retiring?</strong></p> <p>No. I’m not a person for sitting on beaches. What would I do?</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/KNwixrmdVbg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-brian-may-discusses-queens-greatest-moments#comments Brian May highlights Interview June 2011 Queen Interviews Features Magazine Sun, 19 Jul 2015 12:01:15 +0000 Ben Mitchell 17434 at http://www.guitarworld.com Queen, Tony Iommi and Roger Daltrey Perform "I Want It All" in 1992 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/video-queen-tony-iommi-and-roger-daltrey-perform-i-want-it-all-1992 <!--paging_filter--><p>We thought we'd drop in on Queen—Brian May, John Deacon and Roger Taylor—who hosted the star-studded Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert on April 20, 1992.</p> <p>Hey, why not?</p> <p>The show, which was witnessed by a crowd of 70,000-plus, took place at London's Wembley Stadium.</p> <p>Among the special guests that day were Black Sabbath's Tony Iommi and the Who's Roger Daltrey, both of whom sat in for this spirited performance of "I Want it All," a track that originally appeared on Queen's <em>The Miracle</em> (1989).</p> <p>Queen singer Freddie Mercury had died the previous November 24.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/4CSSnrY3Ezs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/tony-iommi">Tony Iommi</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-queen-tony-iommi-and-roger-daltrey-perform-i-want-it-all-1992#comments Brian May Queen Roger Daltrey Tony Iommi Videos Blogs Features Mon, 13 Jul 2015 19:11:14 +0000 Damian Fanelli 20616 at http://www.guitarworld.com Ritchie Blackmore, David Gilmour, Brian May and Others Play "Smoke on the Water" in 1989 — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/ritchie-blackmore-david-gilmour-brian-may-and-others-play-smoke-water-1989-video/24936 <!--paging_filter--><p>It was 26 years ago this week that one of the greatest guitar hero gatherings of all time got under way. The occasion was a remake of the 1972 Deep Purple hit “Smoke on the Water” that featured some of the biggest players in rock, including Ritchie Blackmore—who wrote the song’s classic riff—David Gilmour, Tony Iommi, Alex Lifeson and Brian May. </p> <p>The guitarists and numerous other musicians recut the song as a benefit recording for Rock Aid Armenia, a humanitarian effort by the British music industry to raise money for victims of the 1988 Armenian earthquake, a devastating event that killed up to 50,000 people. </p> <p>The recording, which began on July 8, 1989, included a who’s who of the era’s best-known hard rock performers and went on to become a hit. </p> <p>In addition to its cast of stellar guitarists, the track featured a different singer on each verse, including Deep Purple’s Ian Gillan (who sang the original), Paul Rodgers, Iron Maiden’s Bruce Dickinson and Bryan Adams. The session also featured Yes bassist Chris Squire, Queen drummer Roger Taylor, and keyboardists Keith Emerson and Geoff Downes (of Asia, who also co-produced the session with Gary Langan). </p> <p>The session took place at the historic Metropolis Studios in Chiswick, London. Recording began on July 8, 1989 and was completed over five different sessions. The first session featured guitarist Geoff Beachamp filling in for Brian May, who’d broken his arm a few days before. May was healed up in time for the August 5 session, which he performed with David Gilmour. </p> <p>Following a vocal and keyboard session on August 27, the recording saw the tracking of more guitars on September 10, when May showed up with his friend Tony Iommi and Ritchie Blackmore. Rush’s Alex Lifeson made it for the final session, on September 24. (If you want a complete rundown of what happened when, and with whom, check out the excellent web site RockAidArmenia.com.) </p> <p>The single, which featured Black Sabbath’s “Paranoid” on the B-side, was released as “Smoke on the Water ’90” and made it to the U.K. Top 40 Singles Chart. It was also the lead track on The Earthquake Album, a full-length compilation of donated tracks from Pink Floyd, Iron Maiden, Led Zeppelin, Black Sabbath, and many of the other bands represented in the “Smoke on the Water” session. </p> <p>The “making of” video below compiles scenes from the five tracking sessions. It’s actually the official promo video for the 2010 Wermut &amp; Dee remix of the track and was to raise funds to rebuild a children’s music school in Gyumri in the Armenian earthquake zone.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1tsw3nKDlBE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/deep-purple">Deep Purple</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/david-gilmour">David Gilmour</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/ritchie-blackmore-david-gilmour-brian-may-and-others-play-smoke-water-1989-video/24936#comments Brian May David Gilmour Deep Purple Ritchie Blackmore Videos News Mon, 13 Jul 2015 17:42:23 +0000 Christopher Scapelliti 24936 at http://www.guitarworld.com Queen's Brian May Provides "Rude Awakenings" on New Kalinich and Tiven Album http://www.guitarworld.com/queens-brian-may-provides-rude-awakenings-new-kalinich-and-tiven-album <!--paging_filter--><p>Today, GuitarWorld.com presents <a href="http://www.popmatters.com/post/194951-kalinich-and-tiven-each-soul-has-a-voice-album-stream-premiere/">"Rude Awakenings,"</a> a new song by Kalinich and Tiven that features a somewhat unorthodox guitar solo by Queen's Brian May.</p> <p>The track is from Kalinich and Tiven's new album, <em>Each Soul Has a Voice,</em> which will be released July 3 by MsMusic.</p> <p>Stephen Kalinich and Jon Tiven have racked up some impressive credits since the Sixties and Seventies. Kalinich collaborated with the Beach Boys, co-writing “Little Bird” with Dennis Wilson, and Tiven has worked with everyone from the Rolling Stones and Alex Chilton to Alabama Shakes.</p> <p>“Brian [May] and I have been good friends for over 40 years, and [the] last time he came through New York he came over and we had a few jam sessions, which we recorded in case something good could come from them," Tiven told <em><a href="http://www.glidemagazine.com/136237/song-premiere-stephen-kalinich-jon-tiven-rude-awakenings/">Glide Magazine</a></em>. </p> <p>"I added a few instruments and sent it to Brian, who was shocked at the shape it had taken, quite delighted actually, and insisted on fixing a few things on his original guitar track. But the essence of the original inspiration is intact and very much the soul of the song. </p> <p> "Brian plays all over the track, not just the solo. He's the dominant guitar [on the song]. I play slide on it, plus horns, bass and drums, but I let him take the front seat!"</p> <p><em>Each Soul Has a Voice</em> is the result of songwriting sessions that yielded a hard-to-imagine 700 compositions. Only the 14 best were selected for the new album.</p> <p>“We write a song a day, generally speaking,” Tiven said. “Stevie sends me a lyric and I either write something fresh or use a music track that I’ve managed to compose on a day off. During this process we achieved a closeness as a team that you cannot get unless you write that many songs as a team. </p> <p>"You put two semi-geniuses together and over time they can become one great mind."</p> <p><strong>For more about Kalinich and Tiven and/or the new album, visit <a href="http://yomamamusic.net/">yomamamusic.net</a> and <a href="http://www.foothillrecords.com/">foothillrecords.com.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=https%3A//api.soundcloud.com/tracks/202834733&amp;auto_play=false&amp;hide_related=false&amp;show_comments=true&amp;show_user=true&amp;show_reposts=false&amp;visual=true"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/queens-brian-may-provides-rude-awakenings-new-kalinich-and-tiven-album#comments Brian May Kalinich and Tiven Queen News Wed, 01 Jul 2015 14:04:59 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24854 at http://www.guitarworld.com Queen “Love of My Life” Live Acoustic — Video Finds http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-video-finds-queen-love-of-my-life-live-acoustic <!--paging_filter--><p>Here’s a rare acoustic gem from Queen’s now legendary <em>Queen at Wembley</em> video release. </p> <p>Freddie Mercury and Brian May take the stage for a moving performance of “Love of My Life,” while rain pours down on the Wembley crowd.</p> <p>The clip was filmed on July 11, 1986.</p> <p>The studio version of the track appears on Queen’s classic LP, <em>A Night at the Opera</em>.</p> <p>Here, May plays some excellent fingerstyle guitar on a 12-string acoustic and tells the crowd, “Hope you’re not getting to wet out there! You OK?’ Mercury follows, inviting the crowd to sing along.</p> <p>Watch it below and enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="349" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/aEGLJtu09uU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>Find out more at <a href="http://www.queenonline.com">www.queenonline.com</a>. </p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-video-finds-queen-love-of-my-life-live-acoustic#comments Acoustic Nation Brian May Freddie Mercury Queen Blogs Videos News Fri, 12 Sep 2014 11:34:57 +0000 Acoustic Nation 22355 at http://www.guitarworld.com Queen Guitarist Brian May Undergoes Tests for Cancer http://www.guitarworld.com/queen-guitarist-brian-may-undergoes-tests-cancer <!--paging_filter--><p>Queen guitarist Brian May has revealed he has undergone tests for cancer and other ailments.</p> <p>May, who shared the news on his official website, <a href="http://www.brianmay.com/brian/brianssb/brianssb.html">brianmay.com</a>, said he went to see his doctor over the Christmas holiday due to intense pain that left him unable to stand up.</p> <p>MRI scans revealed "abnormalities" in his bones.</p> <p>"So around Christmas I've been having a succession of blood tests, ultrasounds and various kinds of scans, to see if they could rule out various kinds of cancer," he wrote. "Now, on hearing the 'C' word something happens inside you ... of course. I've seen so many of my dear friends fighting it ... and my Dad lost his battle at age 66, exactly the age I am now.</p> <p>"Over the last few days I've been in various states of unrest. But the great thing has been that the team my GP assembled to check out the possibilities has moved Heaven and Earth to gather all the information I need quickly over the Christmas period ... not an easy time."</p> <p>On December 30, May thanked his fans for their support.</p> <p>"I've been overwhelmed by the amazing messages you've been sending me, folks, since I wrote about my 'Health Scare'," he wrote.</p> <p>"It's taken me by surprise — for many reasons. I really didn't realize how much you guys were gunning for me ... it's great to know that, and I can't thank you enough. It puts a smile on my face. But I didn't realize that biting the bullet and mentioning the 'C' word would unlock such an avalanche. I now realize that so many of you have been wrestling with this all along, personally, or in family or friends, and, like me, found it hard to share. Hearing of your experiences, and courage, and hopes, and solutions, has been a massive eye-opener for me."</p> <p>GuitarWorld.com readers (with some input from the guitarist's fan club) voted May the second-greatest guitarist of all time in a 2012 readers poll. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/readers-poll-results-100-greatest-guitarists-all-time">You can check out the complete results here.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/queen-guitarist-brian-may-undergoes-tests-cancer#comments Brian May News Tue, 31 Dec 2013 14:49:24 +0000 Guitar World Staff 20093 at http://www.guitarworld.com Video Finds: Daryl Kellie's Solo Acoustic Arrangement of Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" http://www.guitarworld.com/video-finds-daryl-kellies-solo-acoustic-arrangement-queens-bohemian-rhapsody <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, check out guitarist Daryl Kellie's solo acoustic arrangement of Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody." </p> <p>Over the past two years, Kellie, who incorporates a heaping helping of guitar-body percussion, harmonics and fret tapping into his playing, has been touring with everyone from Toploader to Carl Palmer of Emerson, Lake and Palmer.</p> <p>He'll release his debut album, <em>Wintersong</em>, February 10. One track from the album, "Would," is available for streaming on Soundcloud. You can <a href="https://soundcloud.com/daryl-kellie/would">check it out here.</a></p> <p>By the way, Brian May's solo on "Bohemian Rhapsody" was ranked the 20th Greatest Guitar Solo of All Time by <em>Guitar World</em>. <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-20-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may">For more about that, head here.</a></p> <p>For more about Kellie, follow him on <a href="https://www.facebook.com/darylkellie">Facebook.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="385" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_fxbx0-O8kY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-finds-daryl-kellies-solo-acoustic-arrangement-queens-bohemian-rhapsody#comments Acoustic Nation Brian May Daryl Kellie News Queen Videos News Mon, 16 Dec 2013 16:04:33 +0000 Damian Fanelli 20008 at http://www.guitarworld.com Photo Gallery: Brian May Performs with 'We Will Rock You' Cast on US Opening Night http://www.guitarworld.com/photo-gallery-brian-may-performs-we-will-rock-you-cast-us-opening-night <!--paging_filter--><p>On October 15, Queen's touring rock musical, <em>We Will Rock You</em>, kicked off its US tour at Baltimore's France-Merrick Performing Arts Center.</p> <p>Queen members Brian May and Roger Taylor were in attendance for opening night — and May even joined the cast on guitar for the show's finale, "We Are the Champions."</p> <p>Below, you can check out <em>Guitar World's</em> exclusive photo gallery from that night, featuring May, Taylor, writer/director Ben Elton, members of the cast and more.</p> <p>The "rock theatrical," which is built around 24 Queen songs, boasts the scale and spectacle that marked the band’s live performances. The show was created by Elton, a British comedian and writer (<em>Mr. Bean, The Young Ones</em>), and boasts a score including "Another One Bites the Dust," "Crazy Little Thing Called Love," "Bohemian Rhapsody" and "We Will Rock You."</p> <p>May and Taylor are musical supervisors to the show, taking an active role in casting the singers/actors and musicians for every production worldwide. </p> <p>For more about <em>We Will Rock You</em>, including all the tour dates and news, visit the tour's <a href="http://www.wewillrockyou.com">official website</a> and <a href="https://www.facebook.com/wewillrockyouoriginal">Facebook page.</a></p> <p><em>Photo: Maia Stern</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/photo-gallery-brian-may-performs-we-will-rock-you-cast-us-opening-night#comments Brian May Maia Stern Queen Roger Taylor News Fri, 18 Oct 2013 19:04:29 +0000 Damian Fanelli 19505 at http://www.guitarworld.com Hear Isolated Guitar Solos from Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody," Deep Purple's "Highway Star," Judas Priest's "Painkiller," Metallica's "Fade to Black" and More http://www.guitarworld.com/isolated-guitar-solos-queen-bohemian-rhapsody-deep-purple-highway-star-judas-priest-painkiller-metallica-fade-black <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, check out the isolated guitar parts from Brian May's solo on Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" and Ritchie Blackmore's solo on Deep Purple's "Highway Star."</p> <p>But wait, there's more! </p> <p>If you keep listening to the playlist, you'll hear several more isolated guitar tracks, including "Painkiller" by Judas Priest, the Eagles' "Hotel California," Eddie Van Halen's solo from Michael Jackson's "Beat It" and Metallica's "Fade to Black." </p> <p>What do these songs have in common? Not a hell of a lot, except that all the clips were posted by the same YouTube account (the guy who made this playlist). </p> <p>If nothing else, these clips are fun to listen to — and they'll help you figure out what you've been doing wrong all these years! Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/etswaxT7Mkg?list=PL3LmXKKwXUCM50650o7Gudig4t6N9IrAn" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/isolated-guitar-solos-queen-bohemian-rhapsody-deep-purple-highway-star-judas-priest-painkiller-metallica-fade-black#comments Brian May Deep Purple Eddie Van Halen Metallica Queen Ritchie Blackmore News Thu, 05 Sep 2013 20:58:23 +0000 Guitar World Staff 19160 at http://www.guitarworld.com Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Readers Poll: Sweet 16 — "Hotel California" (Don Felder, Joe Walsh) Vs. "Brighton Rock" (Brian May) http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-sweet-16-hotel-california-don-felder-joe-walsh-vs-brighton-rock-brian-may <!--paging_filter--><p>A few years ago, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> compiled what we feel is the ultimate guide to the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time.</p> <p>The list, which has been quoted by countless artists, websites and publications around the world, starts with Richie Sambora's work on Bon Jovi's “Wanted Dead or Alive” (100) and builds to a truly epic finish with Jimmy Page's solo on "Stairway to Heaven" (01). </p> <p>To quote our <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-1-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page">"Stairway to Heaven" story that ran with the list</a>, "If Jimmy Page is the Steven Spielberg of guitarists, then 'Stairway' is his <em>Close Encounters</em>." </p> <p>On June 10, we kicked off a summer blockbuster of our own — a no-holds-barred six-string shootout. We pitted <em>Guitar World</em>'s top 64 guitar solos against each other in an NCAA-style, 64-team single-elimination tournament. Every day, we asked you to cast your vote in a different guitar-solo matchup as dictated by the 64-team-style bracket. Now Rounds 1 and 2 have come and gone, leaving us with 16 guitar solos and eight matchups.</p> <p>So ... </p> <p><strong>WELCOME TO THE SWEET 16 ROUND</strong>, where all 16 still-standing solos will go head to head before your eyes! As always, you can vote once per matchup, and the voting ends as soon as the next matchup is posted. </p> <p>In some cases, genre will clash against genre; a thrash solo might compete against a Southern rock solo. But please get real, people! They're all guitar solos, played on guitars, by guitarists, most of them in some subset of the umbrella genre of rock. When choosing, it might have to come down to, "Which solo is more original and creative? Which is more iconic or important? or Which one kicks a larger, more impressive assemblage of asses?"</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-sweet-16-voodoo-child-slight-return-jimi-hendrix-vs-whole-lotta-love-jimmy-page">Latest Sweetwater Sweet 16 Results</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" (63.36 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Whole Lotta Love" (36.64 percent)<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Today's Sweetwater Sweet 16 Matchup (7 of 8)</span><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><em>"Hotel California" Vs. "Brighton Rock"</em></span></p> <p>Today and tomorrow (Wednesday and Thursday), we'll watch as the Eagles' "Hotel California" (08), featuring a classic guitar solo by Don Felder and Joe Walsh, competes against Queen's "Brighton Rock" (41), which features the fretwork of Brian May. Because Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" was eliminated by Pink Floyd's "Comfortably Numb," this is May's last chance to advance to the next round. This is also the only appearance of Don Felder and Joe Walsh in the Sweet 16.</p> <p><strong>HOW THEY GOT HERE</strong></p> <p>• <strong>"Hotel California"</strong> defeated Pantera's <strong>"Walk"</strong> (57) in Round 1 and Steely Dan's <strong>"Reelin' in the Years"</strong> (40) in Round 2.</p> <p>• <strong>"Brighton Rock"</strong> defeated Metallica's <strong>"Fade to Black"</strong> (24) in Round 1 and Ozzy Osbourne's <strong>"Crazy Train"</strong> (09) in Round 2.</p> <p>Get busy! You'll find the poll at the very bottom of the story.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-8-hotel-california-don-felder-joe-walsh">08. “Hotel California”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Don Felder, Joe Walsh<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: The Eagles—<em>Hotel California</em> (Asylum, 1976)</p> <p>Credit for the guitar majesty of “Hotel California” is often given to Joe Walsh, who toughened up the Eagles’ laid-back California sound when he joined the band just prior to the <em>Hotel California</em> album’s recording. Actually, the primary guitar heard throughout the solo belongs to Don Felder, who wrote the music for the track and actually conceived and played the solo’s intricate harmonies on his initial, instrumental demo.</p> <p>“Every once in a while it seems like the cosmos part and something great plops into your lap,” says Felder. “That’s how it was with ‘Hotel California.’ I had just leased this beach house in Malibu and was sitting in the living room with all the doors wide open on a spectacular July day, probably in ’75. I was soaking wet in a bathing suit, sitting on the couch, thinking the world is a wonderful place to be and tinkling around with this acoustic 12-string when those ‘Hotel California’ chords just oozed out. I had a TEAC four-track set up in a back bedroom, and I ran back there to put this idea down before I forgot it.</p> <p>“I set this old rhythm ace to play a cha-cha beat, set the right tempo and played the 12-string on top of it. A few days later, I went back and listened to it and it sounded pretty unique, so I came up with a bass line. A few days after that, I added some electric guitars. Everything was mixed down to mono, ping-ponging back and forth on this little four-track. Finally, I wound up with a cassette that had virtually the entire arrangement that appeared on the record, verbatim, with the exception of a few Joe Walsh licks on the end. All the harmony guitar stuff was there, as was my solo.</p> <p>“Then I gave it to Don Henley on a tape with eight or 10 ideas, and he came back and said, ‘I really love the one that sounds like a Matador…like you’re in Mexico.’ We worked it all up and went into the studio and recorded it as I wrote it—in E minor, just regular, open chords in standard tuning—and made this killer track. All the electric guitars were big and fat and the 12-string was nice and full. Then Henley came back and said, ‘It’s in the wrong key.’ So I said, ‘What do you need? D? F sharp?’…hoping that we could varispeed the tape. But he said no, that wouldn’t work, and we sat down and started trying to figure out the key—and it turned out to be B minor! So out comes the capo, way up on the seventh fret. We re-recorded the song in B minor and all of a sudden the guitar sounds really small and the whole track just shrinks! It was horrible, so we went back and tried it again. Luckily, we came up with a better version in B minor.</p> <p>“I kept the capo on and recorded the acoustic guitar through a Leslie. They took a D.I. out of the console and a stereo Leslie, and they got this swirly effect. Then I went back and did most of the guitars, except for the stuff where Joe and I set up on two stools and ran the harmony parts down. I play the first solo, then it’s Joe. Then we trade lines and then we go into the lead harmonies.</p> <p>“Now that I’ve heard it for 20 years, the 12-string part sounds right to me, but it’s still not as nice as the E minor version we did. And even when we’d finished the song and made it the title track, I wasn’t convinced that it should be our single. I thought it was way too long—twice the normal radio length—and sort of weird because it started out quiet and had this quiet breakdown section in the middle. I was very skeptical, but I yielded to the wisdom of Henley.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/uF8-tk9qGrc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-41-brighton-rock-brian-may">41. "Brighton Rock”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Brian May<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Queen—<em>Sheer Heart Attack</em> (Elektra, 1974)</p> <p>Universally venerated for his lavish guitar orchestrations and tasteful British restraint, Brian May kicked over the traces on this high energy rocker that leads off Queen’s third album, <em>Sheer Heart Attack</em>. One of May’s most blues-based excursions ever, the song’s extended solo section grew out of the guitarist’s experiments with an Echoplex tape delay unit. His original goal was to reproduce his multi-part guitar harmonies live onstage with Queen, back in the days before harmonizers were invented.</p> <p>“I started messing around with the Echoplex, the delay that was available at the time,” May recalls. “I turned up the regeneration until it was giving me multiple repeats. I discovered you could do a lot with this—you could set up rhythms and play against them, or you could play a line and then play a harmony to it. </p> <p>"But I decided that the delay [times] I wanted weren’t available on the Echoplex. So I modified it and made a new rail, which meant I could slide the head along and make the delay any length I wanted, because the physical distance between the two heads is what gave you the delay. Eventually, I had two home-adapted Echoplexes. And I discovered that if you put each echo through its own amp, you wouldn’t have any nasty interference between the two signals. Each amp would be like a full-blown, sustaining, overdriven guitar which didn’t have anything to do with the other one.</p> <p>“So, ‘Brighton Rock’ was the first time that got onto a record. I’d already been trying it live onstage in the middle of ‘Son and Daughter’ [from Queen’s self-titled ’73 debut album], when Queen first toured with Mott the Hoople. It was rather crude at first. But I certainly had a lot of fun with it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TdUKi3_QntE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/tab-books/products/guitar-worlds-100-greatest-guitar-solos-of-all-time/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=ReadersPollSweet16">[[ When you're done voting, start learning most of the guitar solos in this poll — and and a whole lot more! Check out a new TAB book from Guitar World and Hal Leonard: 'The 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time: A Treasure Trove of Guitar Leads Transcribed Note-for-Note, Plus Song Notes for More Than 40 of the Best Solos.' It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $29.99. NOTE: Neil Young's "Cortez the Killer" guitar solo (solo number 39 on our list) is NOT included in this book. ]]</a></strong></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Hotel California" (62.27 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Brighton Rock" (37.73 percent) </p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time">Head HERE to see the current matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/eagles">Eagles</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-walsh">Joe Walsh</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-sweet-16-hotel-california-don-felder-joe-walsh-vs-brighton-rock-brian-may#comments Brian May Don Felder Eagles Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Joe Walsh Poll Polls Queen News Features Wed, 21 Aug 2013 11:44:36 +0000 Guitar World Staff 19057 at http://www.guitarworld.com Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Readers Poll: Sweet 16 — "Comfortably Numb" (David Gilmour) Vs. "Bohemian Rhapsody" (Brian May) http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-sweet-16-comfortably-numb-david-gilmour-vs-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may <!--paging_filter--><p>A few years ago, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> compiled what we feel is the ultimate guide to the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time.</p> <p>The list, which has been quoted by countless artists, websites and publications around the world, starts with Richie Sambora's work on Bon Jovi's “Wanted Dead or Alive” (100) and builds to a truly epic finish with Jimmy Page's solo on "Stairway to Heaven" (01). </p> <p>To quote our <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-1-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page">"Stairway to Heaven" story that ran with the list</a>, "If Jimmy Page is the Steven Spielberg of guitarists, then 'Stairway' is his <em>Close Encounters</em>." </p> <p>On June 10, we kicked off a summer blockbuster of our own — a no-holds-barred six-string shootout. We pitted <em>Guitar World</em>'s top 64 guitar solos against each other in an NCAA-style, 64-team single-elimination tournament. Every day, we asked you to cast your vote in a different guitar-solo matchup as dictated by the 64-team-style bracket. Now Rounds 1 and 2 have come and gone, leaving us with 16 guitar solos and eight matchups.</p> <p>So ... </p> <p><strong>WELCOME TO THE SWEET 16 ROUND</strong>, where all 16 still-standing solos will go head to head before your eyes! As always, you can vote once per matchup, and the voting ends as soon as the next matchup is posted. </p> <p>In some cases, genre will clash against genre; a thrash solo might compete against a Southern rock solo. But please get real, people! They're all guitar solos, played on guitars, by guitarists, most of them in some subset of the umbrella genre of rock. When choosing, it might have to come down to, "Which solo is more original and creative? Which is more iconic or important? or Which one kicks a larger, more impressive assemblage of asses?"</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-sweet-16-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page-vs-heartbreaker-jimmy-page">Latest Sweetwater Sweet 16 Results</a></strong></p> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Stairway to Heaven" (75.66 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Heartbreaker" (24.34 percent)<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Today's Sweetwater Sweet 16 Matchup (4 of 8)</span><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><em>"Comfortably Numb" Vs. "Bohemian Rhapsody"</em></span></p> <p>Today, two Top 20 guitar solos square off! We have a heavy favorite, Pink Floyd's "Comfortably Numb" (04), featuring a truly classic solo by David Gilmour, against Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" (20), which features some lovely playing by Brian May. While this is Gilmour's only solo in the Sweet 16, May is also represented by "Brighton Rock," which will face the Eagles' "Hotel California" (08) in the days ahead. </p> <p><strong>HOW THEY GOT HERE</strong></p> <p>• <strong>"Comfortably Numb"</strong> defeated Metallica's <strong>"Master of Puppets"</strong> (61) in Round 1 and Steve Vai's <strong>"For the Love of God"</strong> (29) in Round 2.</p> <p>• <strong>"Bohemian Rhapsody"</strong> defeated the Doors' <strong>"Light My Fire"</strong> (45) in Round 1 and Stevie Ray Vaughan's <strong>"Texas Flood"</strong> (13) in Round 2.</p> <p>Get busy! You'll find the poll at the very bottom of the story.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-4-comfortably-numb-david-gilmour">04. “Comfortably Numb”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: David Gilmour<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Pink Floyd—<em>The Wall</em> (Columbia, 1979)</p> <p>How do you reason with two guys who once went to court over the artistic ownership of a big rubber pig? That was Bob Ezrin’s mission when he agreed to co-produce Pink Floyd’s <em>The Wall</em> with guitarist David Gilmour and bassist/vocalist Roger Waters. The legendary tensions between the two feuding Floyds came to a head during sessions for <em>The Wall</em> in 1979—which was why Ezrin was called in.</p> <p>“My job was to mediate between two dominant personalities,” recalls Ezrin. However, the producer turned out to be no mere referee, but contributed plenty ideas of his own. “I fought for the introduction of the orchestra on that record,” says Ezrin. “This became a big issue on ‘Comfortably Numb,’ which Dave saw as a more bare-bones track. Roger sided with me. So the song became a true collaboration—it’s David’s music, Roger’s lyric and my orchestral chart.”</p> <p>Gilmour’s classic guitar solo was cut using a combination of the guitarist’s Hiwatt amps and Yamaha rotating speaker cabinets, Ezrin recalls. But with Gilmour, he adds, equipment is secondary to touch: “You can give him a ukulele and he’ll make it sound like a Stradivarius.”</p> <p>Which doesn’t mean Gilmour didn’t fiddle around in the studio when he laid down the song’s unforgettable lead guitar part. “I banged out five or six solos,” says Gilmour. “From there I just followed my usual procedure, which is to listen back to each solo and make a chart, noting which bits are good. Then, by following the chart, I create one great composite solo by whipping one fader up, then another fader, jumping from phrase to phrase until everything flows together. That’s the way we did it on ‘Comfortably Numb.’ ”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/_FrOQC-zEog" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-20-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may">20. “Bohemian Rhapsody”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Brian May<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Queen—<em>A Night at the Opera</em> (Hollywood, 1975)</p> <p>“Freddie [Mercury] had the whole piece pretty well mapped out, as I remember, but he didn’t have a guitar solo planned. So I guess I steamed in and said, ‘This is the point where you need your solo, and these are the chords I’d like to use.’ </p> <p>The chord progression for the solo is based on the verse, but with a slight foray into some different chords at the end, to make a transition into the next part of the song. I’d heard the track so many times while we were working on it that I knew in my head what I wanted to play for a solo. I wanted the guitar melody to be something extra, not just an echo of the vocal melody. I had a little tune in my head to play. It didn’t take very long to record.</p> <p>“The next section of the song, the heavy bit, was really part of Freddie’s plan. I didn’t change what he had very much. Those guitar riffs that everybody bangs their heads to are really more Freddie’s than mine. And at the end of that section, I sort of took over. I wanted to do some guitar orchestrations—little violin lines—coming out of that. And it blended in very well with what Freddie was doing with the outro.</p> <p>“We were stretching the limits of technology in those days. Since ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ was entirely done on 16-track, we had to do a lot of bouncing as we went along; the tape got very thin. This ‘legendary’ story, which people think we made up, is true: we held the tape up to the light one day—we’d been wondering where all the top end was going—and what we discovered was virtually a transparent piece of tape. All the oxide had been rubbed off. It was time to hurriedly make a copy and get on with it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/k-ARuoSFflc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/tab-books/products/guitar-worlds-100-greatest-guitar-solos-of-all-time/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=ReadersPollSweet16">[[ When you're done voting, start learning most of the guitar solos in this poll — and and a whole lot more! Check out a new TAB book from Guitar World and Hal Leonard: 'The 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time: A Treasure Trove of Guitar Leads Transcribed Note-for-Note, Plus Song Notes for More Than 40 of the Best Solos.' It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $29.99. NOTE: Neil Young's "Cortez the Killer" guitar solo (solo number 39 on our list) is NOT included in this book. ]]</a></strong></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Comfortably Numb" (61.34 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Bohemian Rhapsody" (38.66 percent)</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time">Head HERE to see the current matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/david-gilmour">David Gilmour</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/pink-floyd">Pink Floyd</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-sweet-16-comfortably-numb-david-gilmour-vs-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may#comments Brian May David Gilmour Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Pink Floyd Poll Polls Queen News Features Wed, 14 Aug 2013 14:37:32 +0000 Guitar World Staff 19014 at http://www.guitarworld.com Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Readers Poll: Round 2 — "Crazy Train" (Randy Rhoads) Vs. "Brighton Rock" (Brian May) http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-2-crazy-train-randy-rhoads-vs-brighton-rock-brian-may <!--paging_filter--><p>A few years ago, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine compiled what we feel is the ultimate guide to the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time.</p> <p>The list, which has been quoted by countless artists, websites and publications around the world, starts with Richie Sambora's work on Bon Jovi's “Wanted Dead or Alive” (100) and builds to a truly epic finish with Jimmy Page's solo on "Stairway to Heaven" (01). </p> <p>To quote our <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-1-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page">"Stairway to Heaven" story that ran with the list</a>, "If Jimmy Page is the Steven Spielberg of guitarists, then 'Stairway' is his <em>Close Encounters</em>." </p> <p>In June, we kicked off a summer blockbuster of our own — a no-holds-barred six-string shootout. We pitted <em>Guitar World</em>'s top 64 guitar solos against each other in an NCAA-style, 64-team single-elimination tournament. Every day, we asked you to cast your vote in a different guitar-solo matchup as dictated by the 64-team-style bracket. Now Round 1 has come and gone, leaving us with 32 guitar solo and 16 (sweet) matchups. </p> <p>You can vote only once per matchup, and the voting ends as soon as the next matchup is posted (Basically, that's one poll per day). </p> <p>In some cases, genre will clash against genre; a thrash solo might compete against a Southern rock solo, for instance. But let's get real: They're all guitar solos, played on guitars, by guitarists, most of them in some subset of the umbrella genre of rock. When choosing, it might have to come down to, "Which solo is more original and creative? Which is more iconic? or Which one kicks a larger, more impressive assemblage of asses?"</p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Yesterday's Results</span></p> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Comfortably Numb" (67.34 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "For the Love of God" (32.66 percent)<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Today's Round 2 Matchup (11 of 16)</span><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><em>"Crazy Train" Vs. "Brighton Rock"</em></span></p> <p>Today, it's Randy Rhoads' guitar solo on Ozzy Osbourne's "Crazy Train" (09) against Brian May's solo on Queen's "Brighton Rock" (41). "Crazy Train" bumped off Black Sabbath's "War Pigs" to earn a spot in Round 2. Meanwhile, "Brighton Rock" got here by defeating Metallica's "Fade to Black." Get busy! You'll find the poll at the very bottom of the story.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-9-crazy-train-randy-rhoads">09. “Crazy Train”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Randy Rhoads<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Ozzy Osbourne—<em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> (Epic, 1981)</p> <p>Randy Rhoads employed a two-part process when recording his solos for <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em>. First, the classically trained young shredder would take his customized Jackson guitars to a stone room downstairs at England’s Ridge Farm Studios where he would work out each of his solos, among them “Crazy Train.”</p> <p>“This was after we did the backing tracks,” says <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> engineer Max Norman. “Randy had a Marshall and a couple of 4x12s, and we had him set up in this room with the cabinets facing up out into the main studio. They were miked at various points: close, at three feet and again at about 12 feet. I would make Randy a loop of the solo section and we’d just let that play into these big monitors downstairs, where he would just sit and jam away for hours and hours until he had composed his completed solo.”</p> <p>With the solos arranged to his liking, Rhoads would then report upstairs to the control room to record them. “We’d plug the guitar directly into the console,” recalls Norman. “We’d preamp it in the console and send it down to the amp from there. That way we could control the amount of gain that hit the amp, which is always a problem when running a remote amplifier and trying to get a good enough signal to it."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Gmws31TTN90" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-41-brighton-rock-brian-may">41. "Brighton Rock”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Brian May<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Queen—<em>Sheer Heart Attack</em> (Elektra, 1974)</p> <p>Universally venerated for his lavish guitar orchestrations and tasteful British restraint, Brian May kicked over the traces on this high energy rocker that leads off Queen’s third album, <em>Sheer Heart Attack</em>. One of May’s most blues-based excursions ever, the song’s extended solo section grew out of the guitarist’s experiments with an Echoplex tape delay unit. His original goal was to reproduce his multi-part guitar harmonies live onstage with Queen, back in the days before harmonizers were invented.</p> <p>“I started messing around with the Echoplex, the delay that was available at the time,” May recalls. “I turned up the regeneration until it was giving me multiple repeats. I discovered you could do a lot with this—you could set up rhythms and play against them, or you could play a line and then play a harmony to it. </p> <p>"But I decided that the delay [times] I wanted weren’t available on the Echoplex. So I modified it and made a new rail, which meant I could slide the head along and make the delay any length I wanted, because the physical distance between the two heads is what gave you the delay. Eventually, I had two home-adapted Echoplexes. And I discovered that if you put each echo through its own amp, you wouldn’t have any nasty interference between the two signals. Each amp would be like a full-blown, sustaining, overdriven guitar which didn’t have anything to do with the other one.</p> <p>“So, ‘Brighton Rock’ was the first time that got onto a record. I’d already been trying it live onstage in the middle of ‘Son and Daughter’ [from Queen’s self-titled ’73 debut album], when Queen first toured with Mott the Hoople. It was rather crude at first. But I certainly had a lot of fun with it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/TdUKi3_QntE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/tab-books/products/guitar-worlds-100-greatest-guitar-solos-of-all-time/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=ReadersPollRound2">[[ When you're done voting, start learning every guitar solo in this poll — and more! Check out a new TAB book from Guitar World and Hal Leonard: 'The 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time: A Treasure Trove of Guitar Leads Transcribed Note-for-Note, Plus Song Notes for More Than 40 of the Best Solos.' It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $29.99. ]]</a></strong></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Brighton Rock" (54.45 percent)<br /> <Strong>Loser:</strong> "Crazy Train" (45.55 percent)</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time">Head HERE to see today's matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ozzy-osbourne">Ozzy Osbourne</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/randy-rhoads">Randy Rhoads</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-2-crazy-train-randy-rhoads-vs-brighton-rock-brian-may#comments Brian May Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Ozzy Osbourne Poll Polls Queen Randy Rhoads News Features Thu, 25 Jul 2013 15:30:31 +0000 Guitar World Staff 18893 at http://www.guitarworld.com Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Readers Poll: Round 2 — "Texas Flood" (Stevie Ray Vaughan) Vs. "Bohemian Rhapsody" (Brian May) http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-2-texas-flood-stevie-ray-vaughan-vs-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may <!--paging_filter--><p>A few years ago, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine compiled what we feel is the ultimate guide to the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time.</p> <p>The list, which has been quoted by countless artists, websites and publications around the world, starts with Richie Sambora's work on Bon Jovi's “Wanted Dead or Alive” (100) and builds to a truly epic finish with Jimmy Page's solo on "Stairway to Heaven" (01). </p> <p>To quote our <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-1-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page">"Stairway to Heaven" story that ran with the list</a>, "If Jimmy Page is the Steven Spielberg of guitarists, then 'Stairway' is his <em>Close Encounters</em>." </p> <p>In June, we kicked off a summer blockbuster of our own — a no-holds-barred six-string shootout. We pitted <em>Guitar World</em>'s top 64 guitar solos against each other in an NCAA-style, 64-team single-elimination tournament. Every day, we asked you to cast your vote in a different guitar-solo matchup as dictated by the 64-team-style bracket. Now Round 1 has come and gone, leaving us with 32 guitar solo and 16 (sweet) matchups. </p> <p>You can vote only once per matchup, and the voting ends as soon as the next matchup is posted (Basically, that's one poll per day). </p> <p>In some cases, genre will clash against genre; a thrash solo might compete against a Southern rock solo, for instance. But let's get real: They're all guitar solos, played on guitars, by guitarists, most of them in some subset of the umbrella genre of rock. When choosing, it might have to come down to, "Which solo is more original and creative? Which is more iconic? or Which one kicks a larger, more impressive assemblage of asses?"</p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Yesterday's Results</span></p> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "No More Tears" (57.81 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Floods" (42.19 percent)<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Today's Round 2 Matchup (6 of 16)</span><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><em>"Texas Flood" Vs. "Bohemian Rhapsody"</em></span></p> <p>Today, we go from "Floods" to "Texas Flood" (13) as Stevie Ray Vaughan's famous 1983 blues guitar solo goes head to head with Brian May's classic solo on Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" (20). Get busy! You'll find the poll at the bottom of the story.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100_greatest_guitar_solos_13_quottexas_floodquot_stevie_ray_vaughan">13. “Texas Flood”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Stevie Ray Vaughan<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: <em>Texas Flood</em> (Epic, 1983)</p> <p>When Stevie Ray Vaughan and Double Trouble walked into Los Angeles’ Down Town Studio in November 1982 to take advantage of 72 free hours of time offered by studio owner Jackson Browne, they had no idea they were about to start recording their debut album. “We were just making tape,” recalls drummer Chris Layton. “We hoped that maybe we were making a demo that would actually be listened to by a real record company.”</p> <p>The first 24 hours were spent getting settled in L.A., and in the second and third days the band cut 10 songs—which became <em>Texas Flood</em>, in its entirety. “It really was just a big warehouse with concrete floors and some rugs thrown down,” says bassist Tommy Shannon. “We just found a little corner, set up in a circle looking at and listening to each other and played like a live band.” The trio recorded two songs the second day and eight the third—including “Texas Flood,” a slow blues, written and recorded by the late Larry Davis in 1958, which had been a live staple of Vaughan’s for years. It was the final tune recorded, cut in one take just before the free time ran out.</p> <p>“That song and the whole first album captures the pure essence of what Stevie was all about,” says Layton. “Countless people would tell Stevie how much they loved his guitar tone on <em>Texas Flood</em>. There was literally nothing between the guitar and the amp. It was just his number-one Strat plugged into a Dumble amp called Mother Dumble, which was owned by Jackson Browne and was just sitting in the studio. </p> <p>The real tone came from Stevie, and that whole recording was just so pure; the whole experience couldn’t have been more innocent or naive. We were just playing. If we’d had known what was going to happen with it all, we might have screwed up. The magic was there and it came through on the tape. You can get most of what the band was ever about right there on that song and that album.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/wVjdMLAMbM0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-20-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may">20. “Bohemian Rhapsody”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Brian May<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Queen—<em>A Night at the Opera</em> (Hollywood, 1975)</p> <p>“Freddie [Mercury] had the whole piece pretty well mapped out, as I remember, but he didn’t have a guitar solo planned. So I guess I steamed in and said, ‘This is the point where you need your solo, and these are the chords I’d like to use.’ </p> <p>The chord progression for the solo is based on the verse, but with a slight foray into some different chords at the end, to make a transition into the next part of the song. I’d heard the track so many times while we were working on it that I knew in my head what I wanted to play for a solo. I wanted the guitar melody to be something extra, not just an echo of the vocal melody. I had a little tune in my head to play. It didn’t take very long to record.</p> <p>“The next section of the song, the heavy bit, was really part of Freddie’s plan. I didn’t change what he had very much. Those guitar riffs that everybody bangs their heads to are really more Freddie’s than mine. And at the end of that section, I sort of took over. I wanted to do some guitar orchestrations—little violin lines—coming out of that. And it blended in very well with what Freddie was doing with the outro.</p> <p>“We were stretching the limits of technology in those days. Since ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ was entirely done on 16-track, we had to do a lot of bouncing as we went along; the tape got very thin. This ‘legendary’ story, which people think we made up, is true: we held the tape up to the light one day—we’d been wondering where all the top end was going—and what we discovered was virtually a transparent piece of tape. All the oxide had been rubbed off. It was time to hurriedly make a copy and get on with it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fJ9rUzIMcZQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/tab-books/products/guitar-worlds-100-greatest-guitar-solos-of-all-time/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=ReadersPollRound2">[[ When you're done voting, start learning every guitar solo in this poll — and more! Check out a new TAB book from Guitar World and Hal Leonard: 'The 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time: A Treasure Trove of Guitar Leads Transcribed Note-for-Note, Plus Song Notes for More Than 40 of the Best Solos.' It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $29.99. ]]</a></strong></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Bohemian Rhapsody" (67.37 percent)<br /> <Strong>Loser:</strong> "Texas Flood" (32.63 percent)</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time">Head HERE to see today's matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-2-texas-flood-stevie-ray-vaughan-vs-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may#comments Brian May Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Poll Polls Queen Stevie Ray Vaughan News Features Sat, 20 Jul 2013 11:18:20 +0000 Guitar World Staff 18860 at http://www.guitarworld.com Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Readers Poll: Round 1 — "Bohemian Rhapsody" (Brian May) Vs. "Light My Fire" (Robby Krieger) http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-1-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may-vs-light-my-fire-robby-krieger <!--paging_filter--><p>A few years ago, the editors of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine compiled what we feel is the ultimate guide to the 100 Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time.</p> <p>The list, which has been quoted by countless artists, websites and publications around the world, starts with Richie Sambora's work on Bon Jovi's “Wanted Dead or Alive” (Number 100) and builds to a truly epic finish with Jimmy Page's solo on "Stairway to Heaven" (Number 1). </p> <p>To quote our <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-1-stairway-heaven-jimmy-page">"Stairway to Heaven" story that ran with the list</a>, "If Jimmy Page is the Steven Spielberg of guitarists, then 'Stairway' is his <em>Close Encounters</em>." </p> <p>We've kicked off a summer blockbuster of our own — a no-holds-barred six-string shootout. We're pitting <em>Guitar World</em>'s top 64 guitar solos against each other in an NCAA-style, 64-team single-elimination tournament. Every day, we will ask you to cast your vote in a different guitar-solo matchup as dictated by the 64-team-style bracket. </p> <p>You can vote only once per matchup. The voting for each matchup ends as soon as the next matchup is posted (Basically, that's one poll per day during the first round of elimination, including weekends and holidays). </p> <p>In some cases, genre will clash against genre; a thrash solo might compete against a Southern rock solo, for instance. But let's get real: They're all guitar solos, played on guitars, by guitarists, most of them in some subset of the umbrella genre of rock. When choosing, it might have to come down to, "Which solo is more original and creative? Which is more iconic? or Which one kicks a larger, more impressive assemblage of asses?"</p> <p><span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Yesterday's Results</span></p> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "November Rain" (79.36 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "You Really Got Me" (20.64 percent)<br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Today's Round 1 Matchup (Day 22):</span><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;"><em>"Bohemian Rhapsody" Vs. "Light My Fire"</em></span></p> <p>Today, Brian May's guitar solo on Queen's "Bohemian Rhapsody" (20) squares off against Robby Krieger's solo on the Doors' "Light My Fire" (45). Get busy! You'll find the poll at the very bottom of the story.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-20-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may">20. “Bohemian Rhapsody”</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Brian May<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: Queen—<em>A Night at the Opera</em> (Hollywood, 1975)</p> <p>“Freddie [Mercury] had the whole piece pretty well mapped out, as I remember, but he didn’t have a guitar solo planned. So I guess I steamed in and said, ‘This is the point where you need your solo, and these are the chords I’d like to use.’ The chord progression for the solo is based on the verse, but with a slight foray into some different chords at the end, to make a transition into the next part of the song. I’d heard the track so many times while we were working on it that I knew in my head what I wanted to play for a solo. I wanted the guitar melody to be something extra, not just an echo of the vocal melody. I had a little tune in my head to play. It didn’t take very long to record.</p> <p>“The next section of the song, the heavy bit, was really part of Freddie’s plan. I didn’t change what he had very much. Those guitar riffs that everybody bangs their heads to are really more Freddie’s than mine. And at the end of that section, I sort of took over. I wanted to do some guitar orchestrations—little violin lines—coming out of that. And it blended in very well with what Freddie was doing with the outro.</p> <p>“We were stretching the limits of technology in those days. Since ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ was entirely done on 16-track, we had to do a lot of bouncing as we went along; the tape got very thin. This ‘legendary’ story, which people think we made up, is true: we held the tape up to the light one day—we’d been wondering where all the top end was going—and what we discovered was virtually a transparent piece of tape. All the oxide had been rubbed off. It was time to hurriedly make a copy and get on with it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fJ9rUzIMcZQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-45-light-my-fire-robby-krieger">45. "Light My Fire"</a></strong><br /> <strong>Soloist</strong>: Robby Krieger<br /> <strong>Album</strong>: The Doors—<em>The Doors</em> (Elektra, 1967)</p> <p>“Light My Fire” was one of the first songs ever written by Robby Krieger, and his extended solo on the album version was also one of his shining moments as a guitarist. Ironically, however, in order for “Light My Fire” to become a hit for the Doors and Krieger the songwriter, Krieger the guitarist had to swallow his pride and allow his masterly two-and-a-half-minute solo to be trimmed down to its essential opening and closing themes for use on the single.</p> <p>“That always bothered me,” Krieger readily admits. “We never wanted to cut it, but our first single, ‘Break on Through,’ flopped and radio stations told us that ‘Light My Fire’ would be a hit if we cut it down. We didn’t have much choice because AM radio ruled everything, and if you wanted to get on AM you had to have a short song.”</p> <p>The longer solo now regularly broadcast on the radio in its entirety is a perfect distillation of Krieger’s style. A flamenco-trained guitarist who played with his fingers and often evoked sitar-like Eastern sounds with his Gibson SG, Krieger pulled out all the stops on “Light My Fire.” Still, the guitarist says that the complete version on the album is far from his finest effort. “It was the kind of solo that I usually did, but it was different every night. To be honest, the one on the album is not one of my better takes. I only had two tries at it. But it’s not bad; I’m glad that it was as good as it was.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9iSXrZYhJt4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <h1>Voting Closed!</h1> <p><strong>Winner:</strong> "Bohemian Rhapsody" (77.77 percent)<br /> <strong>Loser:</strong> "Light My Fire" (22.23 percent)</p> <p><strong><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/tags/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time">Head HERE to see today's matchup and all the matchups that have taken place so far!</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/brian-may">Brian May</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/queen">Queen</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/robby-krieger">Robby Krieger</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/doors-0">The Doors</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/greatest-guitar-solos-all-time-readers-poll-round-1-bohemian-rhapsody-brian-may-vs-light-my-fire-robby-krieger#comments Brian May Greatest Guitar Solos of All Time Poll Polls Queen Robby Krieger The Doors News Features Mon, 01 Jul 2013 11:55:51 +0000 Guitar World Staff 18681 at http://www.guitarworld.com