Chris Broderick http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/344/all en Chris Broderick Discusses His Years with Megadeth, Act of Defiance's Debut Album http://www.guitarworld.com/life-after-deth-chris-broderick-discusses-his-years-megadeth-act-defiances-debut-album/25086 <!--paging_filter--><p>Being a hired gun has its advantages for a guitarist that just wants to play and doesn’t need the responsibility of writing songs, choosing what gets recorded and dealing with record label bean counters. </p> <p>But for ex-Megadeth guitarist Chris Broderick, rocking out to someone else’s tunes night after night wasn’t enough. So on November 25, six hours after drummer Shawn Drover left the band, Broderick told Dave Mustaine he, too, was quitting.</p> <p>“The decision was a long time in the making,” Broderick says, sitting poolside at his Los Angeles home. “Being in Megadeth was great for my career, but I wanted to have some creative freedom and some freedom in how I presented myself.”</p> <p>Broderick replaced Megadeth’s guitarist Glen Drover in 2008 and played on three of the band’s studio albums, three live releases and never missed a tour. For almost six years he dedicated most of his time to Megadeth and had no fallback plans. </p> <p>Then, during a conversation with Drover, the two decided to use a batch of material they had written for Megadeth as the launching point for a new band, Act of Defiance. The two quickly wrote 10 songs that were considerably heavier and more musically intricate than anything they had played for years.</p> <p>To complete the lineup, they hired Scar the Martyr vocalist Henry Derek Bonner and ex–Shadows Fall guitarist Matt Bachand on bass. Then with the help of Chris “Zeuss” Harris, Act of Defiance assembled <em>Birth and the Burial</em>, a crushing technical metal album that offers more musical diversity than Broderick revealed in Megadeth. </p> <p>“Thy Lord Belial” is fast and unrelenting, pausing only for a call-and-response chorus, “Refrain and Refracture” starts with an acoustic arpeggio over a neo-classical lead and features a melodic rhythm redolent of Killswitch Engage and “Poison Dream" builds from classical piano and strings into an epic multi-faceted thrasher.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uPOzOA3Paxo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p>“The sound of <em>Act of Defiance</em> is kind of like if you invited every genre of metal together to go to a concert and mosh in a pit, whether it’s old-school thrash to death metal to Scandinavian black metal and everything in between. There are elements of all those types of metal. And I love that about it.”</p> <p>In a candid, articulate interview, Broderick talks about his years with Megadeth, the rules of being in that band, how he and Drover assembled Act of Defiance, why he hired a guitarist to play bass and the unconventional recording process for <em>Birth and the Burial</em>.</p> <p><strong>Shawn Drover recommended you to Dave Mustaine in 2008 after his brother Glen left the band and Glen, who left Megadeth on good terms, endorsed you. How did you know the Drovers and did either of them call you to let you know you were being considered?</strong> </p> <p>They knew me from Nevermore, but I didn’t hear anything from them until I was in the band. Management called totally out of the blue. I didn’t know what to make of it. I almost thought it was a prank at first. They wanted me to meet with Dave first and then audition.</p> <p><strong>Had you been a Megadeth fan?</strong></p> <p>I had no idea where they were at their career at that point, so I had no expectations. I just thought it was a great opportunity so I jumped at it.</p> <p><strong>Did you think you’d be able to provide creative input into the band?</strong></p> <p>I knew I wouldn’t be able to demand anything. I saw it as a great job and I allowed my employer to dictate the terms. It’s not like when you’re a teenager and you get together with your friends and you’re like, “Ahhh, partners for life!” I wish it was like that, but it definitely wasn’t. There is a hierarchy after a band is established and has a legacy.</p> <p><strong>Were you comfortable in that role?</strong></p> <p>I loved playing for the crowd. When you walk onstage and the crowd is having a good time, it’s great. </p> <p><strong>Did Mustaine tell you what to play and how to play it?</strong></p> <p>When we did songs from the back catalog I was playing another guitarist’s parts, whether it was Chris Poland, Marty Friedman or Jeff Young. So I played like they did and Dave did his part. That always worked out really well. As far as the albums I played on, Dave designated the solo spots and he had some input in what I could or could not do. </p> <hr /> <strong>Was there a dress code in Megadeth?</strong> <p>There definitely was a dress code that he wanted to maintain for a Megadeth look. For me, with everything in this camp, I saw very early on that Dave is the owner of the company and he is the one that has the right to say how the company is presented and how it should look. The only time we had any issues was when I didn’t know a specific thing about how he wanted my appearance to be, and then I would find out as we went along. I saw it very early on as a job requirement and I felt that if the job is worth it to me then I would make those changes.</p> <p><strong>On the first tour you did with Megadeth you played a seven-string guitar, which is what you play now. But for the rest of your tenure with the band you played a six-string. Did that work better for the music you were playing?</strong></p> <p>Dave felt a seven-string guitar wasn’t an original thrash metal instrument. Therefore he felt it would be better if I used six strings.</p> <p><strong>Had you considered leaving the band in the past?</strong></p> <p>I was constantly weighing the positives against the negatives. I likened it to a lawyer that’s working for a firm and finally wants to break out and start his own firm or a chef that wants to open up his own restaurant. You have to deal with the corporate mannerisms from the company you’re working for. And once it gets to a point where you feel like you would be happier on your own, that’s when you finally to cut the cord. I had been thinking about what to do for a long time, but up until I decided to leave, I always felt the positives outweighed the negatives.</p> <p><strong>When did that balance tip?</strong></p> <p>Not until the last quarter of 2014. I was dwelling on my lack of musical creativity in the band. Dave was getting ready to go in and do another CD and my heart just wasn’t in it because I knew I wasn’t going to have any artistic say in the definition of the album and the music. He was calling saying, “Hey, I want to get you guys down there.” The last thing I wanted to do was go down there and work on a partial CD and then say, “Hey, this isn’t for me.” It was just the right time to leave.</p> <p><strong>Had you and Shawn talked about leaving Megadeth and forming a new band?</strong></p> <p>It’s funny. Shawn and I felt exactly the same way, but we didn’t think about putting together a band together until after we had both left. When Shawn told me he was going to quit I was a bit shocked and surprised. [Bassist] Dave Ellefson called me right away and went, “Dude, Shawn just quit!" I talked to him for a while, and then I thought about my own situation. I bounced it off my friends and family and decided it was the right thing for me to do as well. </p> <p><strong>Did Dave try to convince you to stay?</strong></p> <p>No, no. Once a decision like that is made, it’s best just to move on.</p> <p><strong>When did you and Shawn decide to start working on Act of Defiance?</strong></p> <p>Obviously, Shawn and I stayed in contact, and not long after we both left we realized there was all this great music we’d written for Megadeth that didn’t get used. So we thought, Why don’t we put something together and get it out there?</p> <p><strong>Are any of these songs about experiences you had In Megadeth or ways you felt about leaving the band?</strong> </p> <p>Just like with anybody, they draw on all of our experiences. They’re about my experiences in life, in Megadeth, in my guitar playing. Everything I do reflects in my lyrics.</p> <p><strong>Did you want to write songs that didn’t sound anything like Megadeth?</strong></p> <p>No, we just wanted the writing to be natural. I like to write complex parts and keep them in that heavy, thrashy realm, but I also really like extreme Scandinavian black metal. And Shawn listens to Cannibal Corpse all day long, so we wanted to get some of that in there, too.</p> <p><strong>Did the music come easily?</strong></p> <p>Some songs came together quicker than others. There were nights where I was spending much more time in my studio than anywhere else. But it was really satisfying to work with material that I had created. When I worked on Shawn’s songs we used mostly his riffs, which was fine. It was a real collaboration, which was exciting. And for the album we ended up using five of his songs and five of mine.</p> <p><strong>Did you work with Shawn’s drum parts?</strong></p> <p>Not for my songs. I used Toontrack Superior Drummer. It makes demoing extremely easy and gave Shawn a clear idea of what I was thinking. But there were a lot of times he would say, “Hey, I was thinking this other kind of beat would work better,” and most of the time a drummer’s going to have a better idea of what the drums should do than a guitarist. His songs had guitar parts, too, because he can hold his own as a guitarist, and he got his brother Glen to help out with some of the guitar tones at first, and definitely with the production.</p> <p><strong>The album is cohesive, which is impressive considering you incorporated so many styles of metal in there and wrote and recorded the songs hundreds of miles apart from one another.</strong></p> <p>It’s amazing what you can do these days by trading files digitally. Shawn and I have a really good working chemistry from years of playing together. We each wrote five songs on our own, then we bounced them off each other. Sometimes we made minimal changes, like switching a chord or two to make it sound a little bit darker, but that’s about it. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/SIDbvTpPGdc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <strong>You wrote and recorded on a seven-string?</strong> <p>I have my signature series Jackson Soloist that I used along with a couple of prototypes that I had Jackson build for me. They were all seven-strings. I’ve always been a traditional seven-string guitarist so it was great to be able to get back to that and get the sounds I love.</p> <p><strong>Did you want a different guitar tone than what you had in Megadeth?</strong></p> <p>Just like every other musician, I am very opinionated about what I think is the perfect sound. So it was awesome to have the freedom to use the tones that I really love. I have a number of amps that I use, whether it’s Engl or the Fender 5150 III, but in the end I wound up recording this entire album with my Fractal Audio Axe-Fx II. </p> <p><strong>Why did you decide to use an amp simulator when you have the equipment to record with mikes and amps?</strong></p> <p>The Fractal sounds amazing to me. That technology has come such a long way and the ability that it has to give you such a clean and clear recording, and the convenience just made it a hands-down win. I liken it to photography. Do you see anyone shooting film these days? </p> <p><strong>Did you pre-write your leads?</strong></p> <p>Well, I actually start with the rhythm. I like rhythms that support leads really well. If you’re going to have a solo, you might as well not be soloing over some random rhythm. So I constructed rhythms in a way that supported either a melodic or harmonic depth. Then I would listen to it and imagine what I wanted to hear. That’s when it would start to come to life for me. </p> <p><strong>Once you have an idea in mind do your solos tend to come quickly and spontaneously?</strong></p> <p>No, I spend a lot of time on my leads, but there are times when I spend a lot of time on a lead because I want it to sound spontaneous and off the cuff. If you want it to sound more anxious you rush ahead of the beat a little bit. And if you want it to sound more lackadaisical and you want it to seem like you were just thinking about getting to that note and you barely got to it in time, you play a little bit behind the beat. So for me it’s a very musical process because it starts with what I imagine, but then when it comes time to execute, it becomes a very thoughtful process.</p> <p><strong><em>Birth and the Burial</em> features guitar harmonies and there’s always a rhythm guitar playing along with the solos. Did you consider working with a second guitarist?</strong></p> <p>I really enjoy working with another guitar player, but this band came together so quickly and was so much about writing the music and then getting a vocalist and bassist that we never considered hiring a second guitarist. Depending on how touring goes, I’m thinking of bringing a second guitarist out with us, but we’ll see. </p> <p><strong>Did you know Scar the Martyr vocalist Henry Derek before you hired him to sing?</strong></p> <p>We didn’t. We put together a list of 30 singers we thought might work for us and then narrowed them down to five. We contacted everyone to see if they were interested and then sent them a demo and had them add vocals. Henry was hands-down the one whose vocals suited the music the best. He’s very talented at screaming and singing. So he came to my studio and we tracked all the vocals there, along with all the guitars, cello and piano. </p> <p><strong>It’s odd that you hired Shadows Fall guitarist Matt Bachand to play bass.</strong></p> <p>Shawn reached out to Matt when we got to the point where we were thinking about having a permanent member onstage. Matt’s a great vocalist, a great guitarist and he showed us that he can lay down great bass lines as well. He did a lot of songwriting on all of those Shadows Fall records and in reality, Matt’s probably got as much or more touring experience than any of us. </p> <p><strong>Did Matt play on <em>Birth and Burial?</em></strong></p> <p>He recorded bass lines for all 10 tracks at his place. I laid down some of the initial bass tracks on the demo versions and sent them to him and he substituted them with these great parts that sound like real bass lines. They’re not just doubling the guitar line. </p> <p><strong>What was the greatest obstacle you’ve faced with Act of Defiance?</strong> </p> <p>Time. We all thought we’d have all the time we needed. We even thought we were ahead of the game because we started with the stuff we didn’t use in Megadeth. But once you bring a record label into the picture then you have to commit to a release date that’s not too late in the year and all of a sudden your back is against the wall. </p> <p>We started working on the songs at the beginning of December. I demoed vocals with Henry in January and by February Shawn was tracking his drums. That left March and April to record all the guitars, vocals and bass. We had the album finished at the end of April, ready to be mastered. So we did the whole thing in about five months. </p> <p><strong>You recorded tracks in three different studios, then handed all the songs to Zeuss to mix and master. Did he change the sound of the songs?</strong></p> <p>At first, Shawn and I were both concerned that the songs might not sound so cohesive. When Zeuss recorded Shawn’s drums, he provided input to make the parts even better. And then he took all the rest of the tracks we did and mixed them so well that it sounds like we all wrote and recorded everything in the same room.</p> <p><strong>Is it scary going from an established band to being back in a position where you have to prove yourself?</strong></p> <p>It might make me a little anxious if I knew I had any control over it. But I don’t, so it’s not worth wasting my time thinking about it. The only thing I can do is promote the band and do the best I can performing these songs. Anything else is wasted energy. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/life-after-deth-chris-broderick-discusses-his-years-megadeth-act-defiances-debut-album/25086#comments Act of Defiance Chris Broderick Megadeth September 2015 Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 28 Jul 2015 12:30:02 +0000 Jon Wiederhorn 25086 at http://www.guitarworld.com Shred Fest II: Chris Broderick and Gus G Teach Each Other Shred Licks — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/chris-broderick-and-gus-g-teach-each-other-shred-licks-video/25094 <!--paging_filter--><p>What's it like when two master shredders get together to exchange ideas, talk technique and more? </p> <p>We caught a glimpse in our first <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/shred-fest-chris-broderick-and-gus-g-trade-licks-talk-guitar-video/25015">"Chris Broderick and Gus G shred fest" video last week</a>—and now we're back with a brand-new clip!</p> <p>This time, <em>Guitar World</em>'s <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-15-future-of-shred?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GusChrisVideo2">latest cover stars</a> teach each other a host of shred licks, discuss their new projects and more. Check it out below!</p> <p>A few things while we have your attention: </p> <p>• <strong>Check out</strong> the new issue of <em>Guitar World</em> (with Chris and Gus on the cover) <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-15-future-of-shred?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GusChrisVideo2">right here.</a> </p> <p>• <strong>Enjoy</strong> Gus G's brand-new music video, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/gus-g-premieres-new-song-quest-exclusive/24982">"Brand New Revolution."</a> </p> <p>• <strong>Check out</strong> this Chaos Theory lesson by Chris Broderick, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/adapting-keyboard-style-arpeggios-fretboard-tapping-part-1">Adapting Keyboard-Style Arpeggios to Fretboard Tapping, Part 1 (with tab and video).</a></p> <p>• <strong>Watch</strong> this video of <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-eva-vergilova-covers-princes-purple-rain-video">guitarist Eva Vergilova playing instrumental versions of Prince's "Purple Rain" and Scorpions' "Sails of Charon."</a> </p> <p><strong><em>For more about Chris Broderick, <a href="http://www.chrisbroderick.com/">head here.</a> For more about Gus G, <a href="http://www.gusgofficial.com/">head in this general direction.</a> Stay tuned for the next exclusive GW video featuring these two shredders!</em></strong> </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/VHJQ3Gg-65k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-15-future-of-shred?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GusChrisVideo2"><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-15%20at%2011.50.40%20AM.png" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 11.50.40 AM.png" width="620" height="809" /></a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/gus-g">Gus G</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/chris-broderick-and-gus-g-teach-each-other-shred-licks-video/25094#comments Chris Broderick Gus G September 2015 shred shred fest Videos Interviews News Features Tue, 28 Jul 2015 11:09:01 +0000 Damian Fanelli 25094 at http://www.guitarworld.com Shred Fest: Chris Broderick and Gus G Trade Licks, Talk Guitar — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/shred-fest-chris-broderick-and-gus-g-trade-licks-talk-guitar-video/25015 <!--paging_filter--><p>What's it like to sit around with Chris Broderick and Gus G? </p> <p>It's probably a lot like this! </p> <p>Check out this new video featuring <em>Guitar World</em>'s <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-15-future-of-shred?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GusChrisVideo1">latest cover stars,</a> Chris Broderick and Gus G. It's fun (and a little intimidating) to see these two insanely talented guitarists trade licks, talk inspiration, influences and more. </p> <p>A few things while we have your attention: </p> <p>• <strong>Check out</strong> the new issue of <em>Guitar World</em> (with Chris and Gus on the cover) <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-15-future-of-shred?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GusChrisVideo1">right here.</a> </p> <p>• <strong>Enjoy</strong> our premiere of <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/gus-g-premieres-new-song-quest-exclusive/24982">"The Quest" from Gus G's new solo album, <em>Brand New Revolution.</em></a> </p> <p>• <strong>Check out</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-chris-brodericks-arpeggio-etude-tapping-hammer-ons-and-attitude">one of the most insane "Betcha Can't Play This" videos,</a> ever, featuring Chris Broderick. </p> <p>• <strong>Read</strong> this random story about <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/carlos-santana-stevie-ray-vaughan-jimmie-vaughan--los-lobos-cesar-rosas-1988-video/25004">Stevie Ray Vaughan jamming with Carlos Santana</a> in 1988. </p> <p><strong><em>For more about Chris Broderick, <a href="http://www.chrisbroderick.com/">head here.</a> For more about Gus G, <a href="http://www.gusgofficial.com/">head in this general direction.</a> Stay tuned for the next exclusive GW video featuring these two shredders!</em></strong> </p> <p><iframe src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ZPzGpsi4gO4" width="620" height="365" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <p><a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-september-15-future-of-shred?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=GusChrisVideo1"><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-07-15%20at%2011.50.40%20AM.png" alt="Screen Shot 2015-07-15 at 11.50.40 AM.png" width="620" height="809" /></a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/gus-g">Gus G</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/shred-fest-chris-broderick-and-gus-g-trade-licks-talk-guitar-video/25015#comments Chris Broderick Gus G September 2015 shred trade licks Videos Features Lessons Tue, 21 Jul 2015 11:18:20 +0000 Damian Fanelli 25015 at http://www.guitarworld.com The 30 Greatest Shred Albums of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/30-greatest-shred-albums-all-time <!--paging_filter--><p>To some people, shred guitar is about one thing, and one thing only: the need for speed. The yearn to burn. The desire for <em>fire</em>. </p> <p>Just the word itself can conjure glorious images of long-haired, pointy-guitar-wielding metalmen, fingers scaling fretboards with dazzling dexterity and furious speed, melody and musicality by damned. And indeed, during the shred zeitgeist of the 1980s, it seemed as if guitarists built up bpms the way Russia and the U.S. stockpiled nukes.</p> <p>But in fact shred was around well before the Eighties, and it has continued to thrive in the decades since. Because shred guitar is about more than just velocity, or how many notes you can squeeze into a bar of music. And it doesn't necessarily require the use of distortion, electricity or, is some cases, even a pick.</p> <p>In the following gallery, we present 30 great players from the Golden Era, the Old-School Era and the Modern Era of shred, along with the album and song that best exemplifies their shredding skills. </p> <p>As these entries attest, shred is about pushing boundaries, exploring the great guitar unknown and, basically, doing really cool stuff that's never been done before. Of course, a bit of sheer, unadulterated fret-burning speed doesn't hurt either.</p> <p><strong>NOTE: Once again, the photo gallery below is divided into three eras — the Golden Era, the Modern Era and the Old School era — each of which contains 10 albums. The gallery is arranged in that order.</strong></p> <p>Enjoy!</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/30-greatest-shred-albums-all-time#comments Brad Paisley Chris Broderick December 2010 Derek Trucks Joe Bonamassa Stevie Ray Vaughan Guitar World Lists News Features Magazine Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:24:02 +0000 Richard Bienstock, Andy Aledort 13062 at http://www.guitarworld.com Guitarist Chris Broderick Quits Megadeth http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-chris-broderick-quits-megadeth <!--paging_filter--><p>Guitarist Chris Broderick has left Megadeth.</p> <p>Around 1 a.m. EST, Broderick posted the following statement via Facebook and Twitter:</p> <p>"Due to artistic and musical differences, it is with great reluctance that I announce my departure from Megadeth to pursue my own musical direction.</p> <p>"I want all of you to know how much I appreciate the amount that you the fans have accepted and respected me as a member of Megadeth for the last seven years, but it is time for me to move on.</p> <p>"I wish Dave [Mustaine] and everyone in Megadeth all the best. I am working on a few things of my own and hope that when they come out, you will all dig it."</p> <p>It is interesting to note that drummer Shawn Drover quit the band yesterday (Tuesday, November 25) "to pursue [his] own musical interests." </p> <p>Broderick, who is 44, joined Megadeth in late 2007 as the replacement for Glen Drover. Before joining Megadeth and while still in Jag Panzer, he was also a touring guitarist for Nevermore between 2001 and 2003 and then again between 2006 and 2007.</p> <p> <strong> The guitarist, who used to write and film the <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/adapting-keyboard-style-arpeggios-fretboard-tapping-part-1">popular Chaos Theory lesson columns</a> for <em>Guitar World</em>, also is responsible for one of the most popular "Betcha Can't Play This" videos in the history of the series. You can check out THE video below.</strong></p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> wishes Broderick success in his future ventures.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zJQbtY9M1Hk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitarist-chris-broderick-quits-megadeth#comments Chris Broderick Megadeth News Wed, 26 Nov 2014 14:46:25 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22968 at http://www.guitarworld.com Chaos Theory with Chris Broderick: Adapting Keyboard-Style Arpeggios to Fretboard Tapping, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/adapting-keyboard-style-arpeggios-fretboard-tapping-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p>This month’s column focuses on an original composition of mine that acknowledges the influence of classical pianists on my playing style, specifically the way in which pianists will play arpeggios across several octaves very quickly (see <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>). </p> <p>In order to emulate that sound on the guitar, I’ve devised a few fretboard tapping techniques. In fact, much of my two-hand tapping technique is based on that goal and approach.</p> <p>The idea is to break down the arpeggios into different sequences, such as four-note groups, and play them in a way that would be quite difficult, if not impossible, to play conventionally. This example is also cool because it has some unusual, “advanced classical” chords in it, such as a Neapolitan chord, an augmented III (three) chord, and some diminished seventh chords.</p> <p>Let’s examine the first half of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>. I start with a second-inversion G minor arpeggio (G Bb D). “Second inversion” means the arpeggio begins (and ends) on the fifth, which in this case is D (see bar 1, beats one through five). On beat six, I switch to a root-position G minor arpeggio, which means that it starts (and ends) on the G root note. </p> <p>All of the phrases in bar 1 are executed with sweep picking. On beat one, I begin with a pull-off from the pinkie to the index finger, and then I reverse rake (or reverse sweep) by dragging the pick in a continuous upstroke across the top five strings through beat two. Beat three begins with a hammer-on and is followed by a forward rake (or downsweep) as the pick is dragged in a continuous downstroke across the strings. The same sweeping techniques are utilized throughout the remainder of the bar. </p> <p>In bar 2, I begin with a G natural minor (G A Bb C D Eb F) legato scalar run across beats one and two, then switch to down-up alternate picking, using notes from the G harmonic minor scale (G A Bb C D Eb F#). Bar 3 features a reference to the VI (six) chord, Eb, and then the II (two major) chord, A, followed in bar 4 with a first inversion (third “in the bass,” or positioned as the lowest note in the chord voicing) Gm/Bb voicing and a second inversion (fifth in the bass) D7/A chord. </p> <p>Bar 5 initiates the section of the piece wherein all of the phrases are executed with tapping, hammer-ons and pull-offs. One can analyze the rhythmic subdivisions of these phrases in a variety of ways, but the prevailing sound is that of an eighth-note triplet feel, with a 16th-note triplet played on each (or the majority of) the eighth notes. In other words, the overall feel is “ONE-trip-let, TWO-trip-let, THREE-trip-let,” etc. This triplet rhythm disguises the fact that the notes are actually phrased in four-note groups, in terms of the line’s melodic contour.</p> <p>The highest note in each four-note melodic group is tapped. This results in two tapped notes per octave, which is a little different than the tapped arpeggios played later in the piece, which include only one tapped note per octave. </p> <p>Beats one and two of bar 5 cover the first octave, and starting on beat three the pattern is repeated an octave higher. Once we reach the highest note in the phrase—D, first string, 22nd fret—at the beginning of bar 6, we descend through G harmonic minor on beat one and then shift to the Neapolitan chord, Ebmaj7, and descend through a series of four-note arpeggios based on the chord tones Eb G Bb D. We then ascend back through the same arpeggiated shapes. This phrase can also be analyzed as G natural minor because these notes all live within the G natural minor scale. </p> <p>This is definitely a complex piece that will require a great amount of practice to get a handle on. The hardest thing of all when playing a piece like this is to keep the idle open strings from ringing. The best advice I can give is use the palm of your pick hand to mute the strings as much as possible, keeping it over the strings that aren’t being played as consistently as you can. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/VRgjCi8OUR4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/chrisbroderick710.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/adapting-keyboard-style-arpeggios-fretboard-tapping-part-1#comments Chaos Theory Chris Broderick Chris Broderick - Chaos Theory July 2010 Megadeth Videos Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 13 Nov 2014 21:55:33 +0000 Chris Broderick 17121 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Jackson Chris Broderick Pro Series Soloist 6 and JS32 Dinky Arch Top Guitars — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jackson-chris-broderick-pro-series-soloist-6-and-js32-dinky-arch-top-guitars-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Jackson guitars have enjoyed a reputation for outstanding quality, beginning with the company’s late-Seventies custom-shop origins and continuing to its present-day status as a major manufacturer. </p> <p>Usually, that quality came at a price higher than most of Jackson’s direct competition, but pros and players who refused to compromise, and who were willing to pay a little extra, allowed the company to thrive without cutting corners. </p> <p>When two new Jackson guitars arrived for me to review, I found the quality exactly what I expected. The unexpected part was their very affordable retail prices, which were two, three, maybe even four times less than I thought they were going to be. Having reviewed the Chris Broderick Soloist 6 a few years ago, I expected that the Chris Broderick Pro Series Soloist 6 would actually be more expensive, due to its stealthy matte-black finish. I was blown away to discover that it costs less than a third of the previous model’s price. The JS32 Dinky Arch Top was an even bigger surprise, as it sells for an insanely low price that simply hasn’t been seen before with a guitar of this quality.</p> <p><strong>Features:</strong> The Chris Broderick Pro Series Soloist 6 features the same sleek body shape, 24-fret neck-through-body design and dual-humbucker configuration as the high-end Broderick Soloist 6. However, it has a few differences, including the matte-black finish, materials and pickups. The most noticeable variance is the fretboard, which is rosewood rather than ebony. The Pro Series Soloist 6’s body and neck, however, are all mahogany. </p> <p>The pickups are direct-mounted DiMarzio CB 6 humbuckers, but the Pro Series Soloist 6 still features the same versatile push-pull controls that provide coil splitting when the master volume control is pulled up and tone circuit bypass when the master tone control is pushed down. In addition to a standard three-way pickup selector switch, the Broderick Pro Series Soloist 6 has a mini toggle kill switch. The tremolo is a recessed Floyd Rose Special FRT-2000 double-locking two-point model.</p> <p>The JS32 Dinky Arch Top is a dead ringer for the original Jackson Dinky model that was a best seller during the height of the late-Eighties/early Nineties shred phenomenon. It has the same slimmed-down, contoured basswood body with an arched top and a slim-profile maple neck with rosewood fretboard, pearloid shark-fin inlays, 24 jumbo frets and compound radius. Electronics consist of a pair of Jackson high-output humbuckers, master volume and master tone controls and a three-way blade pickup-selector switch. A licensed Floyd Rose double-locking tremolo mounted in a deep cavity that permits extreme upward bends completes the package.</p> <p><strong>Performance:</strong> I was very impressed with the feel of the neck on the original Broderick Soloist 6, which remains exactly the same on the Pro Series Soloist 6. With its matte-black finish covering the body and neck alike, the guitar feels like one solid piece, and the entire fretboard is easy to access, thanks to the neck-through-body design. Like the original version, the pickup-selector switch is located within easy reach of the picking hand, which is ideal for players who switch pickups often during songs. And since the switch’s throw is parallel to the strings, you never have to worry about accidentally switching pickups. But the absolute coolest feature of the Pro Series Soloist 6 is its entirely black cosmetics, which gives it the high-tech look of a custom hot rod.</p> <p>As for the JS32 Dinky Arch Top, it’s the best solidbody bargain available today for players who prefer a modern Super Strat design. Whereas many guitars in its price range have substandard electronics and hardware and need more than a few setup tweaks to play well, this Dinky was gig-ready from the second I took it out of the box. The pickups sound bold, clear and punchy, and the tremolo has a smooth, reliable action. The fretwork feels comparable to that of a much more expensive guitar, with perfectly smooth edges. In a blindfold test, most players would be unable to distinguish it from any of Jackson’s previous Dinky models, both in terms of playability and tone.</p> <p><strong>List Prices:</strong> JS32 Dinky Arch Top, $359.99; Chris Broderick Pro Series Soloist 6, $1,199.99<br /> <strong>Manufacturer:</strong> Jackson Guitars, <a href="jacksonguitars.com">jacksonguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet:</strong>The Chris Broderick Pro Series Soloist 6 is a more affordable version of the original Chris Broderick Soloist 6, offering similar circuitry and playability.</p> <p>The Soloist’s push-pull controls provide access to coil-splitting (master volume) and tone-bypass (master tone) functions that expand the guitar’s tonal spectrum.</p> <p>The JS32 Dinky Arch Top has the classic slimmed-down Jackson Super Strat design, featuring two humbuckers and a recessed Floyd Rose tremolo.</p> <p>This Dinky’s 24-fret neck has the same compound radius, slim profile and deep cutaway that have made the original Dinky a shredder’s favorite for decades.</p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line:</strong>The world-famous quality of Jackson’s Custom Shop is now available on two production models that sell for insanely low prices, yet offer uncompromising quality ideal for gigging pros.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3628368653001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3628368653001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jackson-chris-broderick-pro-series-soloist-6-and-js32-dinky-arch-top-guitars-video#comments August 2014 Chris Broderick Jackson Guitars Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Wed, 18 Jun 2014 16:52:49 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario 21588 at http://www.guitarworld.com Chaos Theory with Chris Broderick: Getting a Handle on Essential Pick-Hand Techniques http://www.guitarworld.com/chaos-theory-chris-broderick-getting-handle-essential-pick-hand-techniques <!--paging_filter--><p>Hello and welcome to my new <em>Guitar World</em> instructional column, Chaos Theory.</p> <p>Over the next several months I’m going to show you a variety of the techniques that I consider essential to my approach to the<br /> electric guitar.</p> <p> The exercises in this month’s column emphasize pick-hand techniques that are intrinsic to my style: sweep picking, alternate picking and multiple-finger fretboard tapping. Specifically, I wanted to create a convergence of these different playing techniques within a musical-sounding piece. All the examples demonstrated in this column are played on seven-string guitar in standard tuning (low to high, B E A D G B E).</p> <p> Let’s start with bar 1 of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>: I begin with an ascending run based on a Gmaj7 arpeggio (G B D F#). All the pick-hand-tapped notes in this bar are sounded with the middle finger (indicated by m). There is no picking in the first two bars of this figure, and some of the notes are sounded by firmly hammering the fretting finger down onto the string.</p> <p> Although the run is phrased mostly as sextuplets and septuplets, it ascends in four-note patterns, with each successive four-note group starting one note higher within the arpeggio: the first four notes, G B D G, are all sounded on the fifth string, with the D at the 17th fret as the tapped note. The next four-note group is B D F# B, followed by D F# G D and then F# G B F#; the pattern then starts with the first four notes again, G B D G, but one octave higher.</p> <p> In bar 2 I descend and ascend straight through the Gmaj7 arpeggio in two octaves. On beat four, I employ multiple-finger pickhand tapping to play a scale fragment on the high E string, moving from the index finger (i) to the middle-finger (m) to the pinkie (p) and back down, followed by fret-hand pull-offs. I switch to sweep picking in bar 3, descending and ascending through a C major arpeggio (C E G) in two octaves, followed in bar 4 with a primarily alternate-picked descent through the G major scale (G A B D C E F#).</p> <p> The run wraps up in bars 5 and 6, starting with a tonal shift from G major to its relative minor triad, E minor. On beat one I play a quick descending and ascending Em arpeggio, followed on beat two by some legato scalar movement, with all the notes sounded on the high E string with hammer-ons and pull-offs. Beat three brings multiple-finger tapping back into play, as I roll on the high E string from index to middle to pinkie and then back down, followed by fret-hand pull-offs. The phrase ends with a three-octave descending Em arpeggio, played across beats four and five of bar 5, followed by a big, low B5 power chord.</p> <p> Guitarists often ask me, “How do I develop my pick-hand tapping ability so I can execute multiple-finger tapping techniques?” The first thing is to observe your fret-hand technique and imitate it. My multiple-finger tapping technique is still developing, so if there is a pick-hand tapping figure that I’m having trouble with, I’ll play it with the fret hand first and watch the motion of the fingers. Then I’ll try to imitate those mechanics with my pick hand.</p> <p> It’s good to start with something simple, like the ascending three-notes-per-string scale shown in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. Once you become comfortable playing scales this way, try moving on to arpeggios, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, which are more challenging.</p> <p> This technique also lends itself well to pentatonic scales, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. To help me move seamlessly between normal playing and multiple-finger tapping, I invented a “pick clip,” which affixes my flatpick (I use a Dunlop Sharpie) to my thumb. </p> <p>This device conveniently allows my index finger to let go of the pick without dropping it so I can use all four pick-hand fingers to tap. I initially tried using thumb picks, but the design and shape never worked for me. With the pick-clip, I can use any type of pick. It would be much more difficult, if not impossible, for me to play the multiple taps in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> without it. I’m looking to patent it so I can make it available to others.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/QfyMMnucen8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-17%20at%2010.44.29%20AM.png" width="620" height="708" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-17 at 10.44.29 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-17%20at%2010.44.46%20AM.png" width="620" height="91" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-17 at 10.44.46 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/chaos-theory-chris-broderick-getting-handle-essential-pick-hand-techniques#comments Chaos Theory Chris Broderick June 2010 Videos Blogs Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 17 Jun 2014 14:57:25 +0000 Chris Broderick 21567 at http://www.guitarworld.com Betcha Can't Play This: Chris Broderick's Arpeggio Etude — with Tapping, Hammer-Ons and Attitude http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-chris-brodericks-arpeggio-etude-tapping-hammer-ons-and-attitude <!--paging_filter--><p>This first lick [<strong>FIGURE 1</strong>] is an arpeggio etude [musical-sounding exercise] in A minor that integrates tapping, multiple hammer-on and pull-off combinations and a little bit of economy picking into a steady stream of 16th notes. </p> <p>It pretty much stays within the realm of the A minor pentatonic scale [A C D E G], with the flatted fifth, Eb, added in the last two bars.</p> <p>Playing in this kind of way—with wide fret-hand stretches, taps and an occasional finger slide—helps you cover a wide swath of fretboard territory and yields a smooth, flowing sound. </p> <p>This etude is an attempt to make the pentatonic scale sound more like an arpeggio. With this in mind, I include the chord symbol Am11 in bar 2. Notice in bar 1, however, that I purposefully avoid the note D, in effect creating an Am7 arpeggio [A C E G].</p> <p>Notice that, when moving to a different string during the Am11 pentatonic section that begins midway through bar 2, I’ll initiate the first note on each successive string with either a pick-hand tap, an upstroke with the pick or a fret-hand tap. This latter technique, which is sometimes referred to as a ‘hammer-on from nowhere,’ is indicated by a capital H above the tab.</p> <p>Try to articulate each note as clearly and loudly as possible; make every tap and hammer-on firm, and when pulling off, pull the string slightly in toward your fret-hand palm to keep the string vibrating. Also, try to mute the strings not being played to keep them from ringing sympathetically. This is accomplished primarily by lightly resting the palm of your picking hand on the strings whenever possible.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is a four-bar 16th-note run based on an exotic-sounding Cmaj7#11 arpeggio [C E G B F#]. Some people refer to this as a five-note scale—a ‘haiku,’ or something like that—but I like to thing of it as an arpeggio because it gives me a better concept about what I can do with the notes. For example, knowing that it is a maj#11 arpeggio tells me that I can play it over a IV [four] chord in a major key—in this case, G major—or over the VI [six] chord in a minor key—in this case, E minor.</p> <p>Technically, this run is pretty straightforward, incorporating conventional picking with hammer-ons, pull-offs, finger slides and some string skipping. I would advise you to pay extra attention to picking clarity and efficiency, especially when string skipping. Try not to move the pick any more than you have to—just clear the strings, as opposed to ‘leaping’ or ‘bouncing’ over them.</p> <p>If you check out the video for this lesson, you’ll notice I use a thumb pick. This is an attempt to bring together all the techniques I’ve worked on in my playing career, namely, classical, country finger picking, tapping and, of course, flat picking, in which case I press my index finger against the bottom side of the pick so that it feels like I’m holding a regular plectrum. </p> <p>I have written some riffs that incorporate fast picking and strumming as well as two-hand tapping, and using a thumb pick enables me to quickly and conveniently transition from one technique to another. Using a thumb pick like a flat pick can feel a little weird, though, so I’m still experimenting with it.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zJQbtY9M1Hk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/brod.jpg" width="620" height="743" alt="brod.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/betcha-cant-play-chris-brodericks-arpeggio-etude-tapping-hammer-ons-and-attitude#comments Betcha Can't Play This Chris Broderick October 2006 Videos Betcha Can't Play This News Lessons Thu, 27 Mar 2014 18:40:50 +0000 Chris Broderick 20801 at http://www.guitarworld.com Dear Guitar Hero: Megadeth Guitarist Chris Broderick Discusses Gear, Day Jobs, Learning Marty Friedman's Solos and More http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-megadeth-guitarist-chris-broderick-discusses-gear-day-jobs-learning-marty-friedmans-solos-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p><em>He's the virtuoso lead guitarist in Megadeth and holds a bachelor’s degree in classical guitar performance. But what </em>Guitar World<em> readers really want to know is…</em></p> <p><strong>I’m psyched for the new <em>Countdown to Extinction: Live DVD</em>. What was it like having to learn all those Marty Friedman leads and then perform them nightly? —Tim Riggles</strong></p> <p><em>Countdown to Extinction</em> was my most enjoyable experience of doing a tour that’s based on an entire CD. Two years prior, we had done <em>Rust in Peace</em>, which happened to be the album that really got me into Megadeth in the first place. I loved it because of Marty Friedman’s playing. </p> <p>When I learned <em>Rust in Peace</em>, those songs had the highest learning curve for me, because I was learning a lot about how Marty would phrase things and how he crafted his solos. For <em>Countdown</em>, it was much more enjoyable because I had a better grasp on Marty’s playing. So during that tour I wasn’t as much worried about what was going on technically, and I could focus more on the phrasing and musical expression.</p> <p><strong>Are you using the Fractal Axe-Fx [preamp/effect processor] because of convenience issues when playing live, like easy shipping or being able to run it direct to the P.A.? Or do you honestly prefer it to an amp? — James Thomas</strong></p> <p>I prefer it over an amp. But I don’t just use it out of convenience, even though that is part of the equation when you’re in a touring band. You need to know your gear is gonna work for you and sound good in any situation. And the Fractal meets those criteria. It also has so many ways you can configure its outputs. </p> <p>One way that I like to use it is having output 1, left and right, which typically has a cabinet simulator on it, go straight to my ears. It’s always consistent. If you go to different venues and put the mics in your ears, the cabinets will be at a different volume each night. So by using the cabinet simulator in your ears you take those different variables out of the mix.</p> <p><strong>It’s obvious you take physical fitness seriously. What age did you get into working out, and why? — Alex Kling</strong></p> <p>I got into working out when I was 19 or 20. It was purely out of necessity. I weighed about 250 pounds…and it was not muscle. [laughs] I actually got into guitar around the same time I started gaining all the weight. When I was in elementary school, I hung out with all the jocks. Then one summer I watched way too many cartoons and ate too much. When school started again, all my jock friends were like, “Who are you? See you later.” So I met some new friends who played guitar, and that’s when I picked up the instrument. </p> <p>Anyway, I was pretty badly out of shape, and my sister got me into running. So by the time I turned 25, I went from 250 down to 155 pounds. That’s pretty thin for my height. I noticed one day that I could see my chest bones, so I started lifting weights. But I’ll always feel like that fat kid inside. And I’ll never quit working out because of that. I’ve tried dieting in the past, but it was a temporary solution. It wasn’t until I made a lifestyle change and decided that I was gonna work out for the rest of my life that it made a difference.</p> <p><strong>Is it hard to keep up with your fitness routine while touring? — Roland Morgan</strong></p> <p>I’ll do whatever it takes to stay fit on tour. Typically I’ll get up in the morning and practice guitar for a few hours. Then I’ll hit the gym or go running outside. If there’s no area to work out in, I bring these heavy stretch bands to make sure I get my workout in. I’ll also run the stairs in a hotel if I have to, which is actually great for your cardio. Then I’ll come back, and play more guitar until we hit the stage.</p> <p><strong>What was the worst day job you ever had before you became a professional musician? — JJ Holcomb</strong></p> <p>I would say insulating ductwork and pipes on construction sites. It wasn’t a horrible job, but it was very time-driven. You had to be there at a certain time and had to get a certain amount done so the people coming behind you would be able to put up the drywall or whatever. Then there were the working conditions. You’d be up in crawlspaces or attics, hanging off beams and dealing with all that fiberglass, or whatever the insulation was made out of. </p> <p><strong>When you finish a tour, how do you enjoy your well-deserved time off? — Anita Gongola</strong></p> <p>Well, I can tell you that I just got back yesterday from a wakeboarding trip at Lake Don Pedro, which is in the Central Valley of California. I was beating myself up trying my first inverted heel-side back roll, which is basically when you flip the board over you. And in the wintertime it’s all about snowboarding for me.</p> <p><strong>Which previous Megadeth guitarist is the most difficult to emulate, and which guitarist wrote your favorite Megadeth solos? — Anthony Leyvas</strong></p> <p>Chris Poland is the hardest to emulate, but not necessarily because of the difficulty level. His playing style is just way more foreign to me than Marty Friedman’s. He does a lot more chromatic, tonic and interesting quarter-note bends that you have to pick up on. And my favorite solos are by Marty. He’s been an influence of mine since the Cacophony days and from when he released his solo album <em>Dragon’s Kiss.</em> </p> <p><strong>Over the years you’ve played Ibanez, Schecter and now Jackson. Why was Jackson the right company to make your signature guitar? — Gar Griffith</strong></p> <p>The truth is all manufacturers are capable of producing a great guitar. But Jackson was the only company that stepped up to the plate to do the guitar I had always envisioned in my head. Everyone else said, “We’ll endorse you. Just pick one of our models and we’ll slap your name on it.” There was no difference or reason to have a signature model with that in mind. But Jackson was willing to do the 12-inch continuous radius across the fretboard, with stainless-steel frets and my asymmetrical body, which I designed to sit ergonomically against the player’s body. And the guitar has a lot of nice weight that gives it that Les Paul–kinda tone. </p> <p><strong>Who would you consider to be your biggest guitar inspiration, teacher or mentor? — Bitia Schweinsteiger</strong></p> <p>The one individual that I really want to give kudos to is Jason Becker. Obviously he was a great inspiration to me as a guitarist but also as a person. He’s been through stuff that I couldn’t even imagine, and he’s still active and producing music. He’s a got a great personality and is still very upbeat.</p> <p><strong>It seems like all the biggest shredders say they practice for 10 hours a day. How did you manage to stay focused and motivated? Are you an obsessive dude by nature? — Paco</strong></p> <p>[laughs] Yes, I am an obsessive dude by nature. And that’s probably how I stayed focused! For me, it’s always about focusing on concepts or ideas. When I pick up the guitar I don’t think, Oh it’s time to practice. It’s more like, I haven’t explored these chord moves that I found in Beethoven’s songs and I want to write some studies around them. It’s all about finding what interests you and keeping that at the forefront.</p> <p><strong>You’re known for your epic guitar skills. Can you implement them in full force when writing music with Megadeth? Or does the band limit you in terms of your own technical explorations? — Pavel Selivanov</strong></p> <p>You can always explore all kinds of different styles, but the main thing is knowing whether it’s appropriate for a given song or style of music. For me, it’s not the band that limits me; it’s more about what’s appropriate for the songs. It’s not gonna work if I break out some country licks in the middle of the heaviest thrash song ever written. </p> <p><strong>I read that you have eight siblings. Do you find that that experience helps you now when you’re dealing with different band personalities…say a certain temperamental lead singer? — Julie P.</strong></p> <p>[laughs] It is true—I did come from a family of eight children. But I have no idea if it helps me dealing with different temperaments. But I can tell you it made me very aware of how to read people. I’m very conscious about how other people are feeling.</p> <p><em>Photo: Travis Shinn</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/dear-guitar-hero-megadeth-guitarist-chris-broderick-discusses-gear-day-jobs-learning-marty-friedmans-solos-and-more#comments Chris Broderick Dear Guitar Hero December 2013 GW Archive Megadeth Travis Shinn Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 10 Dec 2013 15:14:04 +0000 Brad Angle, Photo by Travis Shinn 19412 at http://www.guitarworld.com Atomic Punks: Dave Mustaine and Chris Broderick Reminisce About Megadeth’s History and Talk 'Super Collider' http://www.guitarworld.com/atomic-punks-dave-mustaine-and-chris-broderick-reminisce-about-megadeth-s-history-and-talk-super-collider <!--paging_filter--><p>If you count yourself among those music fans that never thought a band as volatile as Megadeth would still be around to celebrate turning 30, you’ll find yourself in good company. Dave Mustaine didn’t imagine they’d make it either, back when they formed, in 1983.</p> <p>“To be totally frank, I didn’t even think I’d live this long, let alone have a career this long,” the singer and guitarist admits. “I remember Junior [bassist Dave “Junior” Ellefson] and I had this crazy pact back then that if the band didn’t make it, we’d go out in a blaze of glory together. It was childish at the time, but it’s weird when you look back and think, 30 years, man! Wow! Did we really do all that?”</p> <p>In fact, Megadeth did do all that, from helping to spawn thrash metal to creating landmark genre albums like <em>Peace Sells… But Who’s Buying?</em> and <em>Rust in Peace</em> to joining their fellow founding fathers on the triumphant Big 4 festival jaunt a couple of years back. They’ve also continued to churn out top-notch new material, and at a healthy clip, too. The band’s newest, 14th studio album is <em>Super Collider</em>, their first release on Mustaine’s own label, Tradecraft, which is distributed by Universal. </p> <p>It’s another strong addition to Megadeth’s catalog and might also be their most diverse. Some of its songs, like “King Maker” and “Built for War,” are the type of knotty speed-metal workouts at which the band has long excelled. But the new album also veers into more melodic territory on tracks like “Forget to Remember” and even flirts with country-inflected rock on “Blackest Crow,” which features banjo-style licks from lead guitarist Chris Broderick and, for the first time on a Megadeth record, slide guitar playing from Mustaine. </p> <p>Then there are the album’s two standout tracks. One is the multipart “Dance in the Rain,” which begins in the midtempo style the band has explored in more recent years, and then moves into a pummeling second half that recalls the ferociously caustic Megadeth of <em>Killing Is My Business… and Business is Good!</em> </p> <p>The other is “Super Collider,” which is perhaps the most bright-hued song in the Megadeth canon, with an uncharacteristically optimistic lyric and a chorus built on open, ringing major chords. “It’s one of those songs that makes people happy, like ‘A Tout Le Monde,’ ” Mustaine says, referencing the 1994 <em>Youthanasia</em> track. </p> <p>“You’ve gotta have some songs like that that everybody can come together on.” But, he’s quick to stress, not too many. “I’d be lying,” he admits with a slight laugh, “if I said I would dig having a whole set of songs like that.”</p> <p>Fresh off recording <em>Super Collider</em>, and with additional mixing and mastering still to be done, Mustaine and Broderick sat down with <em>Guitar World</em> to discuss the new album, their gear and how they work together as musicians and bandmates. Mustaine, now 51, also took time to reflect back on 30 years of metal madness with Megadeth. Regrets? He’s had a few …</p> <p><strong>GUITAR WORLD: <em>Super Collider</em> is a fairly diverse record. The title track, in particular, signals a new sound for the band. How did that one come together?</strong></p> <p><strong>DAVE MUSTAINE</strong> That song kind of came from that “Symphony of Destruction” corner of my mind. You can’t always play aggressive, thrashy stuff. Sometimes those aren’t even songs; they’re like musical rams. But because I’m not a pop guy, I’m also not really comfortable playing sing-along songs. To me, “Super Collider” made sense like a normal song—a verse-chorus-verse-chorus kind of thing. It’s written the way a real songwriter would write the song, instead of just taking all these musical twists and turns. </p> <p><strong>CHRIS BRODERICK</strong> Typically, Megadeth is a guitar-driven band, and we’re super fast and tight. But it was obvious from the get-go that this song was going to be a variation of that. It’s not like I probed into Dave’s mind when he wrote it, but I really get the distinct impression that the song is based on the huge influence AC/DC had on him. I think he wanted just a big, open thing that sounded colossal. So to a large extent with that one, we wanted to keep it not so busy. I definitely had to put the reigns on some of the soloing. </p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> The funny thing is, when we started working on this record, I didn’t have any songs at all. I was just digging through demos I had made over time. And “Super Collider” was one that was just sort of hanging around.</p> <p><strong>From how long ago?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> It was kind of old. Parts of it were very old. I think I had just done the MD.45 record [in 1996]. The majority of it—that kind of “Baba O’Riley,” “Highway to Hell” kind of thing—is from that era. </p> <p><strong>It’s an upbeat song musically as well as lyrically.</strong> </p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I tried to do that. It’s kind of like a “come with me on this ride” sort of thing, which could have all these spiritual connotations to some people. And a lot of that comes from the fact that I’ve been through so much stuff. Even more recently, from when all the reconciliation and everything started. That stuff was hard, too. The hardest part is sticking your toe in the water. But you have to do it. If you’re not willing to reconcile, you’d better be digging two graves—because you wanna kill that person, and the jealousy and hatred is gonna get you too.</p> <p><strong>Are you talking about musical or personal relationships here?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I’m talking about everything with Junior and having him come back; I’m talking about becoming friends with the guys in Metallica and Slayer again…this whole process for me that really started after Darrell Abbott [Pantera’s Dimebag Darrell] was shot. That changed a really big part of me. It made me realize, Wait a minute, man, these are my brothers. The competitive thing that goes on…anybody who says they don’t compete is just bullshitting you. We all want to be the best. That’s why we do this. We want to be as good as our heroes. And at some point, the bravado clicks in and you realize you’ve become really good and the only thing that’s keeping you from going further is you. And why wouldn’t you want to keep getting better?</p> <p><strong>Speaking of getting better, you’ve stated publicly that you feel Chris is the best guitarist you’ve ever played with. </strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> He’s such an enigma. What Chris is capable of doing and what he does are two totally different things. He could do a mind-blowing, over-the-fretboard seven-string solo for six minutes. But he can also play something incredibly melodic. You need to be able to play what fits the song. And that’s the cool thing about the journey we’ve been on together: we’ve learned a lot about each other as people and learned a lot from each other as players. And when it comes to solos, especially for a band like this, you gotta think about it. You gotta really think about where you’re going. You can’t just do scales and sweeps. That said, the guy can do 800 notes in four bars if he wants to. </p> <p><strong>Chris, how does it feel to hear Dave say things like that?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> It’s always very humbling, because he’s worked with a lot of incredible guitarists. Every past player in Megadeth has brought something great to the table, and I think I’m lucky to be counted among them. But as far as how I work with Dave, in a way he makes it easy. The type of personality I am, I like to have a direction and a path and to know what I’m doing. And Dave has such a clear idea of what he wants that I don’t have to deal with a lot of decisions. I just pick up my guitar, put it on and play the songs.</p> <p><strong>Dave, is there any spot on the record where you feel Chris really shines?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> There’s one thing that totally made me do a double take. It’s in “King Maker.” It’s one of the little fills—a quick thing that ends with a dive bomb and then passes off to a solo of mine. And it’s just a fucking great lead. I was in the other room and I heard it, and I went, “Oh, my god. That’s the greatest thing I’ve heard you do in a long time.” Chris knows how to use his tremolo bar subtly. There are guys that excel at that—Adrian Belew, Allan Holdsworth—but not a lot of people in our world can really use the bar in a subtle way.</p> <p><strong>Chris, how did that part come about?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> It’s really just like a 10-to-15-second thing. But I think what actually worked about that solo was that the musical intent matched the song so well. Some of the tonalities I tried to put in there were a little more off base than what someone would typically use over an E minor progression. And, actually, “King Maker” is one of my favorite tracks overall. I’m proud of some of the solo work in it, but I also love the rhythm part. It’s really driving, but it also has this laid-back triplet feel. That’s really unique to me. It’s very “Mustaine.”</p> <p><strong>Another moment of departure on the record is the song “Blackest Crow.”</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> The part at the beginning is me playing a “ganjo,” which is basically a guitar with a banjo body, and it’s strung up like a guitar. And it’s funny: if we had had a banjo in the studio, I probably would have just strung it up like a guitar anyway, to make it conducive to what I know. I think when you start working with a song, it’s almost like the song begins to develop itself. And “Blackest Crow” has an old country sound to it, so it called for that tonality. Then you just look for instrumentation to fit that tonality. </p> <p><strong>Dave is that you playing the slide parts?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> It is. I used my Dean VMNT, but it was on my lap. </p> <p><strong>Like a lap steel?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Yes, sort of like what David Lindley does. </p> <p><strong>Lindley is a great slide player. Were you thinking of guys like that when you composed your lines?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Not really. When I think of slide guitar, I think of guys like Dave Peverett from Foghat and Joe Walsh. Or Ronnie Montrose on “Bad Motor Scooter.” Learning that song was the first time I ever tried doing a slide thing. Before this record, I hadn’t used a slide in years. A lot of years—since I was in Panic [Mustaine’s first band before he joined Metallica in 1982]. I remember we played at this biker party out in the middle of a national forest, and everything went terribly wrong. That was the last time I tried it.</p> <p><strong>What gear did each of you use on the album?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> I used my Signature Series Jacksons, which were great for not only for your typical metal moments but also for some of the mellower stuff, where I was able to get them to sound very Fender Strat-ish. My main amp was an EVH 5150 III. It has a nice grind to it, and it sits in the pocket so well. It never gets buried, but it doesn’t sound overly harsh either. Effects were pretty much all added in the box, though live I’m a total Fractal geek. I use the Fractal Axe-Fx II with a Matrix power amp. I love Fractal stuff. To me, it’s all you need. </p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I played my VMNTs—a Silverburst one on the rhythms and a Korina on the leads. Both have my signature Seymour Duncan Live Wires. For amps, I used a Marshall JVM 410 and a white Randy Rhoads head [the Marshall 1959RR]. I played through that one wide open for the slide solo in “Blackest Crow.” My effects were pretty minimal, just my signature Zoom [the G2.1DM], an MXR Phase 90 and a Cry Baby wah.</p> <p><strong>As much as the band explores new territory on <em>Super Collider</em>, there are also some vintage Megadeth moments. Dave Ellefson has said that parts of the new record reminded him of <em>Killing Is My Business… and Business Is Good</em>!, and you can certainly hear that on something like the second half of “Dance in the Rain.” </strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> Definitely. When I hear a rhythm like the one at the end of “Dance in the Rain,” I start thinking about songs like “Rattlehead” [from <em>Killing Is My Business…</em>] and all of that older stuff that has so much angst to it. I definitely draw from that. I think there’s a direct line to those parts. They have that same mood. That same aggression.</p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> But you know, when I’m writing stuff, I don’t think, This sounds like it’s from this era. I don’t have the ability to think like that. I wish I could. God, I’d go back to <em>Rust in Peace</em> and write another one! Because I was listening to it the other day and I thought, Man, what the fuck was I thinking when I wrote that? Because I know my limitations and shit, and I listen to the title track and I think, That was a lucky day!</p> <p><strong>Along those lines, you’ve been doing some of the old albums onstage for a few years now, first with the <em>Rust in Peace</em> 20th anniversary tour and more recently for a similar celebration for <em>Countdown to Extinction.</em></strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> It’s like a big giant circle. We were actually mixing the <em>Countdown</em> live DVD at the same time we were doing <em>Super Collider</em>. And the interesting thing is, I was listening to those songs and thinking they’re just as relevant today. Take “Psychotron,” and think about all the stuff that’s going on now with drones [unmanned combat vehicles]. So I don’t feel that there’s such a big stretch between then and now with this band. The only time I experience the passage of time is when I try to sing some of those songs. My voice doesn’t go that high anymore!</p> <p><strong>Chris, did the process of learning Megadeth’s back catalog for those anniversary tours inform how you approach the new material?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> I think so. Everything that I’ve learned from the past repertoire gives me more insight into the sound, the mood and how to phrase my parts within Megadeth. I think once a band is in the public eye, it’s almost like the music becomes the property of the public. And in some ways, you don’t want to stray too much from that sound. So every chance I get to listen to an old song that I haven’t played yet, or to work on something like the full-album tours, is an opportunity to understand more about this band.</p> <p><strong>In preparing for the Rust in Peace and Countdown tours, was there anything that you found particularly difficult to play?</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> Some of the material on Rust was a little more technically demanding, but the vibe of some of the stuff on Countdown was sometimes more of a challenge. The clean solo on “High Speed Dirt,” for example, has a really interesting feel to it. And matching that feel took a little bit of work. </p> <p><strong>Most people would automatically assume that Rust in Peace would prove the more challenging of the two.</strong></p> <p><strong>BRODERICK</strong> Well, definitely I would say Rust is a more technical record. But there’s just something about the feel and the way Marty phrased those solos on Countdown. It’s a little different.</p> <p><strong>Speaking of the Nineties-era Megadeth, this is the first time since the <em>Cryptic Writings</em> album in 1997 that the same lineup has appeared on two consecutive records.</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Wise guy! [laughs] Really, though, it’s cool the way Dave, Chris and [drummer] Shawn [Drover] have assimilated into the group. It’s all working now. One of the things I love about playing with Chris is watching him go from being in that category of mind-blowing guitar players to developing into a songwriter as well. And with Shawn, it’s watching him learn to do things like play with brushes on “Blackest Crow” and doing things on the drums that he’s never done before. </p> <p>I remember when Junior was gone, it was just kind of weird. It never really bothered me when we were swapping out drummers and guitar players, but something just felt out of balance without him there. You know, sometimes I think, Man, the times that we were with [former bassists] James MacDonough and James LoMenzo, it was like the lost years, like with Maiden when they had that Blaze [Bayley] guy or Priest when they had Ripper [Owens]. There was something that was just a little off. </p> <p><strong>Considering what’s gone on in the band over the years, is there anything that you regret?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> I do regret some stuff. I regret a lot of the pain that I caused people. I very much regret that. I regret a lot of the good times I missed out on because of the various feuds that we all had. I regret that Gar [Samuelson, Megadeth drummer from 1984 to 1987] died and I didn’t get to say goodbye to him. He was a friend of mine. Sadly, we met in addiction, and our relationship was destined to last as long as it did. And it ended the way it did. But I always felt it ended wrong. </p> <p><strong>His work on those first two records [<em>Killing Is My Business…</em> and <em>Peace Sells…</em>] was phenomenal. </strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> He had a really cool style. And I think it helped Megadeth sink its teeth into this big old elephant and just hang on. We had that really aggressive, peculiar jazz element to us because of him. He really understood music. Of course, playing live with that lineup, with Gar, Junior and [guitarist] Chris [Poland], was a crapshoot. [laughs] Because we were all really heavily under the influence, and it always depended on everyone’s blood-alcohol level or drug count at the moment.<br /> I remember one time we played in McAllen, Texas, and one of the guys had gone down to Mexico and gotten some Mandrakes [Quaaludes], which were illegal in the States. </p> <p>I had just gotten done telling Gar that we bought a bomb to light off at the show. And of course, being broke and on the road, he only had one set of sticks left. When the bomb went off, he freaked out and threw his drumsticks and the music stopped. It was as if you could hear his sticks hit the ground. That was the same show that Poland fell through the stage. He jumped back up and his arm was gushing blood, and he smiled at me. And you know, as much as I had my issues with the man, he’s got this smile that’s like a Dennis the Menace kind of thing; you can never stay mad at him. I think that’s probably why we had so much fun. But we also got in a lot of trouble.</p> <p><strong>It’s now been 30 years since you formed Megadeth. Given everything you’ve gone through to get to <em>Super Collider</em>, are you where you thought you’d be in your career?</strong></p> <p><strong>MUSTAINE</strong> Really, I’m just so grateful that I’m still working and I still have fans. Because it’s a dog-eat-dog business, and it isn’t easy to survive. But I think the cool thing about people is that when you do something wrong and you apologize for it, they’re really forgiving. I’ve done some things wrong, but I’ve also done some things right. And we’ve managed to get through it. I’ve managed to get through it. [laughs] I don’t know, maybe it’s the redhead in me. </p> <p><em>Photo: Travis Shinn</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/atomic-punks-dave-mustaine-and-chris-broderick-reminisce-about-megadeth-s-history-and-talk-super-collider#comments Chris Broderick Dave Mustaine Excerpt June 2013 Megadeth Travis Shinn Galleries Interviews News Features Magazine Fri, 13 Sep 2013 14:42:19 +0000 Richard Bienstock 18225 at http://www.guitarworld.com Interview: Megadeth's Chris Broderick Talks Technique http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-megadeths-chris-broderick-talks-technique <!--paging_filter--><p>"My musical tastes don’t belong to any particular genre," says Megadeth guitarist Chris Broderick. "The only requirement is that the musicians are proficient and the music meets the intent of the composer."</p> <p>With his monolithic chops and die-hard work ethic, Broderick has emerged as the scariest monster shredder on the planet. As he makes clear in the above quote, Broderick has a deep respect for both music and musical performance and has pushed himself relentlessly in the pursuit of technical proficiency and musical freedom. No less an authority than Dave Mustaine calls Broderick “the greatest guitar player Megadeth has ever had.”</p> <p>Now 40, Broderick started playing guitar at age 11. A fan of all things guitar-related, he’s studied rock, metal, jazz, fusion, classical and country, as well as advanced music theory and sight reading. Not surprisingly, his list of favorite guitarists is diverse, and includes rockers (Greg Howe, Paul Gilbert, Jason Becker, John Petrucci, Marty Friedman and George Lynch), jazz players (Django Reinhardt, Wes Montgomery, Allan Holdsworth and George Van Eps) and classical guitarists (John Williams, Paco de Lucia, Scott Tenant and Pepe Romero). </p> <p>Broderick joined Jag Panzer in 1997, replacing Joey Tafolla, and performed with the group for 11 years, during which time he also frequently played live with Nevermore. The guitarist joined Megadeth in 2008 and can be heard shredding his way through the band’s latest album, Endgame. Megadeth are currently on their Rust in Peace 20th anniversary tour. While the band was in New York, Broderick took some time off from his busy schedule to give Guitar World this glimpse into his virtuoso shredding technique. Watch for his new column, Chaos Theory, to begin appearing in these pages in our June 2010 issue. </p> <p><strong>How did you become interested in the guitar?</strong></p> <p>In early middle school, I was really more of a jock than anything else. Then one summer, I went away, and all I did was eat oatmeal and watch cartoons, and subsequently I became a very overweight kid. Back at school in the fall, I was ostracized by all of my jock friends, but I ended up meeting some cool new friends that didn’t care what I looked like or how I acted. It turned out that they were all really into metal. </p> <p><strong>Were any of these guys guitar players themselves?</strong></p> <p>Yes. In fact, one of them would always get annoyed with me, because whenever I was at his house I was always saying, “Come on, let’s go play your guitar!” because I didn’t have a guitar of my own. He’d say, “No, let’s go ride motocross,” or something like that. </p> <p><strong>How old were you when you got your own guitar?</strong></p> <p>When I was 11, I bought one of his friend’s guitars, which was a Sears guitar that was just horrible. You couldn’t even tune it. It had, I think, 18 frets, but it didn’t matter—I had to have it. It had been painted red with a can of spray paint, and I taped it with black tape so it would look like an Eddie Van Halen guitar.</p> <p><strong>Were you a big Van Halen fan?</strong></p> <p>Oh yeah. He was one of my first guitar heroes. I loved to do all the pick scrapes and simple repeated pull-offs to open strings. I remember all of that stuff amazed me so much, even though it was just the tip of the iceberg. </p> <p>So what got me into the guitar in the very beginning was this big shift in my social life. And as soon as I had a guitar, I knew that I wanted to be a guitar player. </p> <p><strong>Did you take formal lessons or did you learn mostly by ear, on your own?</strong></p> <p>No, I took tons of lessons as my guitar playing progressed through high school. At one point, I was taking two classical guitar lessons, an electric guitar lesson, a violin lesson, a piano lesson and a vocal lesson every week! It was definitely way too much to manage. I was also taking some college courses while I was still in high school, so the workload was pretty heavy. </p> <p><strong>Did you consider going to college for music?</strong></p> <p>The ironic thing about that is, when I was in high school, I almost dropped out because I was so into guitar. All I wanted to do was play. I went to my mom one day and said, “I can’t deal with school anymore, and I know I want to play guitar.” My mom begged me not to drop out of school, so I stayed there for another week, and during that week I discovered that you could actually go to college for guitar. I never realized that was possible. So I went to University of Denver’s Lamont School of Music and majored in classical guitar performance. </p> <p><strong>At the time, were you dedicated to classical guitar or were you more interested in becoming a rock guitar player?</strong></p> <p>When I first went into college, I don’t think I had the right mindset to study classical guitar. I was doing it with the idea that to become the ultimate guitarist, one would have to be a classical guitarist. I had heard a decent amount of classical music, but I hadn’t built up a real repertoire of standard classical guitar pieces. When I got to college, all of the other guitar players there had already done that, because they had been classical guitarists for quite a while. That was eye opening for me, and over time I began to see how much easier it is to play an instrument—or do anything, for that matter—if you have a real passion for it. </p> <p>In the beginning, classical guitar was very hard for me, because it was so technically oriented and I didn’t have that love and dedication to the style that I needed to develop. I soon began to see the classical guitar as something very different from the electric guitar, and I think about the two as very independent of one another in terms of how you approach and consider them. I actually think of the electric guitar as being closer to the violin, in that it’s more adaptable to single-string melodies. </p> <p><strong>When you were starting out, what was your favorite style of music to play on electric guitar?</strong></p> <p>I was definitely way into metal in the beginning, and Van Halen was the guy all of my friends and I wanted to be. I remember hearing a song with fretboard tapping and thinking, Wait—he’s using both hands to execute notes on the guitar? That’s going to be way too difficult to learn to do! It was probably something along the lines of this [FIGURE 1], which of course is pretty rudimentary in regards to fretboard tapping.</p> <p>Very shortly after that, I got into Yngwie [Malmsteen], and then that was the new ideal: everything is Yngwie! And so, I had to learn to play this [FIGURE 2], which is a typical, Yngwie-type classical-inspired lick. I learned everything I could from Yngwie’s albums, and then from there it went on to the Shrapnel artists, like Jason Becker, Marty Friedman and Greg Howe, who I really loved. Greg’s newer stuff is really great; I totally dig everything from Introspection onward. I also got into more eclectic people, like Scott Mishoe, who used to do all of this wild slapping and popping stuff on guitar, so I incorporated a little bit of that into my playing. </p> <p>As time went on, my influences broadened, and soon I was heavily influenced by flamenco music and guitar players like Paco De Lucia, Paco Peña and guys like that. </p> <p><strong>Did studying the guitar in college help you get to where you wanted to go as a player?</strong></p> <p> It did, but what I found in college was that everyone was either a classical snob or a jazz snob, and unfortunately I was neither. But I did pick up influences from both of those styles of music. My most recent “new” influence is country guitar, which has been a little harder for me to fully get into. I’ve never dug country music that much, but as soon as I heard people like Chet Atkins and Danny Gatton, I was hooked. And nowadays, I’m really into Johnny Hiland. I love his playing. </p> <p>At some point you realize that there are smoking players in every form of music. So, lately, I’ve started trying to incorporate little things from the country guitar players into my playing as well. I guess that’s why my influences are so broad—I can appreciate the effort that everyone puts into their craft. </p> <p><strong>From the tremendous amount of work that you’ve put into the guitar, do you feel like you’ve got a pretty firm handle on all of these different styles?</strong></p> <p>]No, because the funny thing is, as time goes on, the realization of how much you don’t know only gets worse! I only see more and more things that I need to approach on the instrument—more different techniques, more styles, more players. </p> <p>I remember a time about 15 or 20 years ago when I’d sit down with the instrument and say, Well, I’ve already practiced my scales, I already worked on my arpeggios, I’ve worked on this and I’ve worked on that, and I don’t have anything else to practice. But today, there is just a minefield of things to work on. It’s too much! I finally came to the conclusion that you’ve just got to go toward whatever it is that interests you the most at any given time. Hopefully, you’ll zigzag your way through the patterns of everything you want to learn. Eventually, you’ll come full circle. </p> <p><strong>How did you come to join Megadeth?</strong></p> <p>I got a call from Dave Mustaine’s management company just before the end of 2007, and they asked if I’d be interested in auditioning for Megadeth and, of course, I said yes. So we set up a time for me to go to Dave’s house and talk with him. When I got there, Dave greeted me along with [bassist] James Lomenzo, and we just started to talk and see how the fit would be. From there I played for them a little and then it was straight to work. I had to learn 22 songs in a month for the first show, which was in Europe.</p> <p><strong>Now that you are in Megadeth, do you have time to work on your classical playing or are you playing mostly electric?</strong></p> <p>Lately, the pull has definitely been to the electric guitar, and, unfortunately, my classical guitar has been a little neglected. It’s got some dust collecting on it, and I really feel bad about that, because classical guitar is a passion of mine as well. But, like I said earlier, I know that, when I get the time, I’ll just be on a porch relaxing, playing classical and flamenco music on the guitar. I might even pick the violin back up and scare some cats away with it. </p> <p><strong>For guitar players that have diverse musical interests such as yourself, what would you recommend as a good practice approach?</strong></p> <p>I think you need to focus on your priorities and realize that there are all of these different things that you want to learn, and as you go through all of the things that make you want to play the instrument, you will hopefully get to everything in due time. To me, having the desire is the best way to grow on the instrument. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve tried to focus on learning all of my chord inversions, playing through all the chord voicings of, say, Fmaj7, like this [FIGURE 3]. I’d do all four inversions with the piano voicing, all four inversions closed voicing, and so on, and then a week later I couldn’t remember any of it. But if you apply that approach to a jazz standard and you try to utilize those inversions, it will stick with you, because you are studying those concepts within the context of a piece of music. That’s a much more desirable way to address it than just running through a series of inversions.</p> <p><strong>On your current tour with Megadeth, the band is celebrating the 20th anniversary of <em>Rust in Peace</em>, which featured the guitar work of Marty Friedman. During the performances, how close do you stick to Marty’s original guitar parts and solos? </strong></p> <p>I’m sticking as close as I possibly can. When I’m working on learning a specific riff or part, the first thing I look at are the techniques involved in recreating some of the crazy things that happen on the fretboard, and I play these parts really slowly for a long time. To me, if you try to bring a difficult passage up to tempo in haste, that will only serve to build stress into your playing, which is something that I definitely do not want. </p> <p>I am very meticulous about trying to get the solos that I transcribe, sonically speaking, as accurate as possible. I have never seen Marty play most of these solos, so I might play some of the licks in a different position than he did. But when I play along to the CDs, I try to make it so that it sounds as locked-in and as tight as it can be. From there, I just try to have some fun with it, too. </p> <p>A great example is the first distorted solo from “Holy Wars.” I love the way the solo kicks off, in terms of the changes in tonality from G major to Bf major. Once I learned the phrases, it was my goal to find the best way to make those musical phrases come to life. It begins with 16th notes and then quickly shifts to 16th-note triplets or sextuplets. The solo then shifts to G minor pentatonic and a Gm9 reverse arpeggio, followed by ascending octaves and ending with a cool G blues scale riff. </p> <p><strong>Do you have a set practice routine that you adhere to these days?</strong></p> <p>As recently as two years ago, I’d start off with exercises, focusing on slurs and legato techniques within a chromatic framework. Then I would go through all of my scales, then through my studies and then through my repertoire. That’s almost a “textbook” approach to practicing. But nowadays, when I first put on the electric guitar, I’ll start with a piece of music, and then I’ll deconstruct it from there. </p> <p><strong>Can you give us an example?</strong></p> <p>Sure. If I’m playing a sweep-picking piece like this [FIGURE 4], which is a composition I’m currently working on, I’ll look for the “issues”—the trouble spots—in there. This helps me to focus on the particular areas in each of the arpeggios that I need to work on. Maybe it’s the root form [beat one] that needs work, so I’ll focus on how my pick hand is sitting against the face of the guitar. </p> <p>These days, everything is about how relaxed I can keep both of my hands. That’s so much more important to me than how fast I can play something or how it sounds, because if all you think about is speed, you’re going to set yourself up for failure. Trust me, I know. </p> <p><strong>Describe your pick-hand sweep-picking technique. </strong></p> <p>I think of it as drawing a straight line from point A to point B, dragging the pick across the strings on an even plane. If it’s a small movement within one octave, I recommend a little bit of “wrist contraction,” meaning you should bend slightly at the wrist as you go across the strings. With larger sweeps across multiple octaves, I recommend keeping the wrist steady, and pulling or pushing the whole arm at once across all of the strings. </p> <p>The range of the wrist is actually pretty limited, so, for all of the tight/fast picking, I rock it back and forth, without moving my hand out of place. When I need to use a larger picking movement, I’ll move the entire arm so I can change the position of the pick to suit the movement across the strings. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/chrisbrodericklesson1010.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/interview-megadeths-chris-broderick-talks-technique#comments Chris Broderick GW Archive May 2010 Megadeth Interviews Features Lessons Thu, 13 Jun 2013 18:34:01 +0000 Andy Aledort, Photo by Justin Borucki 17172 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Jackson Chris Broderick Soloist 6 http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jackson-chris-broderick-soloist-6 <!--paging_filter--><p>It’s no surprise that a signature model guitar designed by Megadeth lead guitarist Chris Broderick and Jackson Custom Shop master builder Mike Shannon is a lean-and-mean shred machine. </p> <p>However, the Jackson Chris Broderick Soloist 6 is packed with so many ergonomic and performance enhancements that players who aren’t into Megadeth or even metal in general should check it out as well. </p> <p><strong>FEATURES</strong></p> <p>The Chris Broderick Soloist 6 is a solid and substantial-feeling instrument based on Jackson’s popular double-cutaway super-Strat Soloist design, but the cutaway horns are sleeker and the lower bout is slanted to give the guitar a more streamlined look as well as a more balanced feel. </p> <p>The neck-through-body design provides a seamless transition from the maple neck to the mahogany body wings and quilted maple top, and a deep, semicircular scoop provides easy, comfortable access to the uppermost frets, even at the 24th fret on the low E string. The neck features an inlay-free ebony fretboard, 24 jumbo stainless-steel frets, a 25 1/2–inch scale and a 12-inch radius, which, combined with its shallow, flat neck profile, provides a smooth, fast feel. </p> <p>The Soloist 6’s electronics circuit offers several enhancements, including push-pull coil-split switches for each of the two humbuckers (the bridge splits via master volume, the neck splits via master tone) and a mini toggle below the master tone control that functions as an on/off kill switch. Other pro-quality, high-performance features include a recessed Floyd Rose Pro low-profile bridge, Planet Waves locking Auto-Trim tuners and Ernie Ball strap locks.</p> <p><strong>PERFORMANCE</strong></p> <p>The Soloist 6’s custom-designed, direct-mounted Chris Broderick DiMarzio humbuckers deliver exceptional clarity and articulation that let chords sound big and chunky and single-note lines sing with bold, assertive presence. When the coils are split, the tone is very Strat-like but with a little more meat on its bones, and various combinations produce a wide variety of tones, from chunk to punk to funk. The three-position pickup selector is mounted under the bridge humbucker, making it very easy to access while playing, and the switch’s throw is parallel to the strings, so you never have to worry about switching pickups accidentally.</p> <p>Although my example was somewhat heavy, it was very comfortable to play when strapped on. The neck feels like a dream, making it easy to blaze across the entire fretboard and hit each desired note cleanly and flawlessly.</p> <p><strong>THE BOTTOM LINE</strong></p> <p>You don’t have to be a Megadeth fan to appreciate the high-performance playability and first-class tones of the Jackson Chris Broderick Soloist 6, which truly offers something for players of all styles. </p> <p><strong>LIST PRICE</strong> $3,999.99<br /> <strong>MANUFACTURER</strong> Jackson Guitars, <a href="http://jacksonguitars.com">jacksonguitars.com</a></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1573854884001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1573854884001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-jackson-chris-broderick-soloist-6#comments Chris Broderick Jackson June 2012 Megadeth Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Tue, 26 Mar 2013 11:13:34 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario 15516 at http://www.guitarworld.com Video: Megadeth Post Behind-the-Scenes 'Super Collider' Studio Clip http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeth-post-behind-scenes-super-collider-studio-clip <!--paging_filter--><p>Over the weekend, Megadeth posted another behind-the-scenes clip from their <em>Super Collider</em> recording sessions.</p> <p>The video below, which was filmed in February, features David Ellefson (clad in an attractive <em>Guitar World</em> logo T-shirt), Dave Mustaine and Chris Broderick recording tracks at Vic's Garage studio in San Marcos, California, which is in northern San Diego County. For those of you keeping count, this is <em>Super Collider</em> studio update No. 11.</p> <p><em>Super Collider</em> will be released in June on Mustaine's new label, Tradecraft.</p> <p>Stay tuned for more <em>Super Collider</em> updates!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XM4Eoi7BFok" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-megadeth-post-behind-scenes-super-collider-studio-clip#comments Chris Broderick Dave Mustaine David Ellefson Megadeth Videos News Mon, 25 Mar 2013 14:28:04 +0000 Damian Fanelli 18067 at http://www.guitarworld.com Jackson Unveils 20 Guitars and Basses, Including Chris Broderick, Dave Ellefson, Corey Beaulieu Signature Models http://www.guitarworld.com/jackson-unveils-20-guitars-and-basses-including-chris-broderick-dave-ellefson-corey-beaulieu-signature-models <!--paging_filter--><p>Jackson has unveiled a collection of 20 new models charged with new features designed for speed and killer looks. The 2013 lineup includes artist signature, Pro Series, Dinky and JS Series models. </p> <p>Each product along with its most distinctive features is listed below:</p> <p><strong>ARTIST SIGNATURE MODELS</strong></p> <p><strong>Chris Broderick Pro Series Soloist 6 and 7</strong></p> <p>When Chris Broderick joined a revitalized Megadeth in 2008, fans were awestruck by his chops. Jackson now honors this metal stalwart with the <strong>Chris Broderick Pro Series Soloist</strong>, in six-string and seven-string models.</p> <p>Both models boast an arch-top mahogany body and through-body maple neck, 12”-radius rosewood fingerboard with 24 jumbo frets, 25.5” scale length, stylish fingerboard and headstock binding, direct-mount DiMarzio Chris Broderick signature pickups, Floyd Rose® Special tremolo (Special seven-string tremolo on seven-string model), Jackson die-cast tuners and Dunlop® locking strap buttons. Available in Satin Black and Snow White.</p> <p><strong>Corey Beaulieu USA Signature KV6 and KV7</strong></p> <p>Trivium’s Corey Beaulieu is a true virtuoso and needs a guitar to keep up with his blindingly fast hands. That’s why Jackson is excited to honor him and Trivium fans alike with the <strong>Corey Beaulieu USA Signature KV</strong>, in six-string and seven-string models.</p> <p>Both models feature an alder body (AAA flame top on trans finish model), bound through-body quartersawn maple neck, compound-radius, ebony fingerboard with old-school sharkfin inlays, covered Seymour Duncan® Blackout pickups with three-way toggle switching, single volume control, original Floyd Rose tremolo (seven-string tremolo on seven-string model), and Jackson tuners. Available in Gloss Black, Transparent Black and Transparent Red. Includes case.</p> <p><strong>Dave Ellefson Signature Kelly Bird Bass</strong></p> <p>Megadeth’s Dave Ellefson is expanding his arsenal of signature bass models with the addition of the new David Ellefson Signature Kelly Bird Bass. The four-string bass features a basswood body with Ellefson’s signature red pinstripe finish, bolt-on bound maple neck with 21 jumbo frets and block inlays, EMG® pickups, two volume controls and three-band active EQ, Jackson high-mass four-string HM-4 bridge, and Jackson die-cast tuners. Available in Red Burst with Black Center-Stripe.</p> <p><strong>PRO SERIES</strong></p> <p>Jackson’s 2013 Pro Series welcomes a collection of new models equipped for full-on assault. The models along with their most distinctive features are listed below:</p> <p><strong>Pro DKA Dinky 7 and 8</strong></p> <p>The limited edition Pro DKA Dinky, available in seven-string and eight-string models, features an arch-top alder body, bolt-on maple neck (flat-sawn) with graphite reinforcement, 16”-radius maple fingerboard with 24 jumbo frets and offset position markers (12th-fret shark fin inlay on eight-string model), stylish fingerboard and headstock binding, 26.5” scale length, dual direct-mount DiMarzio D Activator 7™ pickups (8™in eight-string model) with five-way switching, single volume and tone controls, momentary kill switch (for stutter effects), recessed Jackson HT-7 seven-string hard-tail string-through bridge (HT-8 in eight-string model), Planet Waves® locking tuners and Dunlop locking strap pins. Pro DKA7 available in Satin White; Pro DKA8 available in Metallic Black.</p> <p><strong>Pro DK2HT, Pro DK2MHT, Pro DK2QHT and Pro DK2MQHT</strong></p> <p>The DK2HT Pro Series features an alder body, bound bolt-on neck (flat sawn) with graphite reinforcement, compound-radius rosewood fingerboard (maple in Pro DK2MHT and Pro DK2MQHT) with 24 jumbo frets, direct-mount Seymour Duncan JB (bridge) and ’59 (neck) humbucking pickups with five-way switching, single volume tone controls, stylish headstock binding, direct-mount Jackson HT-6 hard-tail string-through bridge, locking Jackson tuners and Dunlop locking strap pins. The DK2QHT and DK2MQHT Pro Series offer the same specifications, with the additional feature of a striking 1/8 4A quilt maple cap. The DK2HT is available in Metallic Black; DK2MHT in Metallic Purple and Blue Glow; the DK2QHT in Natural and Transparent Red; and the DK2MQHT in Chlorine Burst and Transparent Red.</p> <p><strong>USA SELECT</strong></p> <p>USA Select B7MG, USA Select B7MG Deluxe, USA Select B8MG, and USA Select B8MG Deluxe</p> <p>The seven-string B7MG features a beveled alder body, bolt-on quartersawn maple neck with graphite reinforcement and oil finish, compound-radius ebony fingerboard with 24 jumbo frets and side-dot position markers, 27” scale length, direct-mount EMG® 707 (neck) and 81-7 (bridge) pickups, Jackson direct-mount HT-7 hard-tail string-through bridge, Jackson-branded Gotoh® tuners and Dunlop locking strap pins. The USA Select B7MG Deluxe offers the same specifications as the B7MG, but with a 1-piece neck-thru-body quartersawn maple neck with graphite reinforcement and scarf joint. Both models available in Walnut Stain, Au Natural, Satin Black, and Satin Grey. Models include case.</p> <p>The eight-string USA Select B8MG features a beveled alder body, bolt-on quartersawn maple neck with graphite reinforcement, compound-radius ebony fingerboard with 24 jumbo frets and side-dot position markers, 27” scale length, direct-mount EMG® 808 pickups, Jackson direct-mount HT-8 hard-tail string-through bridge, Jackson-branded Gotoh tuners and Dunlop locking strap pins. The USA Select B8MG Deluxe offers the same specifications as the B8MG, but with a 1-piece neck-thru-body quartersawn maple neck with graphite reinforcement and scarf joint. Both models available in Walnut Stain, Au Natural, Satin Black, and Satin Grey. Models include case.</p> <p><strong>JS SERIES</strong></p> <p>JS22-7 DKA Dinky, JS32-7Q Dinky, JS32-8Q Dinky, JS3QM Concert Bass, and JS3VQM Concert Bass</p> <p>The JS22-7 DKA Dinky JS Series seven-string features an arch-top basswood body, bolt-on maple neck, 16”-radius rosewood fingerboard with 24 jumbo frets and “piranha” inlays, 26.5” scale length, dual high-output Jackson humbucking pickups, single volume and tone controls, direct-mount hard-tail bridge, and die-cast tuners. Available in Satin Black.</p> <p>The JS32-7Q Dinky JS Series seven-string, also available with eight strings as the JS32-8Q Dinky, features an arch-top basswood body with a dazzling quilt maple top, bolt-on maple neck, 16”-radius rosewood fingerboard with 24 jumbo frets and piranha inlays, 26.5” scale length, stylish fingerboard and headstock binding, dual high-output Jackson seven-string humbucking pickups (eight-string on JS32-8Q Dinky), single volume and tone controls, direct-mount Jackson HT-7 (HT-8 on JS32-8Q Dinky) hard-tail bridge, and die-cast tuners. JS32-7Q Dinky available in Natural; JS32-8Q Dinky available in Transparent Red.</p> <p>The four-string JS3QM Concert Bass and JS3VQM Concert Bass feature a basswood body with a quilt maple top, super-stable bolt-on maple neck with 24-fret compound-radius rosewood fingerboard, stylish fingerboard and headstock binding, 34” scale length (35” on the JS3VQM), dual high-output Jackson pickups, two volume controls and three-band active EQ (mid/low/high), high-mass four-string Jackson bridge (five-string on the JS3VQM), and die-cast mini tuners. JS3QM available in Transparent Red and Transparent Blue; JS3VQM available in Transparent Amber and Transparent Black.</p> <p>For more information and to find a dealer near you, visit <a href="http://www.jacksonguitars.com/">jacksonguitars.com.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/megadeth">Megadeth</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/chris-broderick">Chris Broderick</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/trivium">Trivium</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/jackson-unveils-20-guitars-and-basses-including-chris-broderick-dave-ellefson-corey-beaulieu-signature-models#comments Chris Broderick Corey Beaulieu Jackson Guitars Megadeth NAMM 2013 Trivium Bass Guitars Electric Guitars News Gear Mon, 11 Feb 2013 16:31:50 +0000 Guitar World Staff 17764 at http://www.guitarworld.com