May 2013 http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/3330/all en Fastest Guitars in the Country: 10 Essential Country Shred Guitar Songs http://www.guitarworld.com/fastest-guitars-country-10-essential-country-shred-guitar-songs <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, <em>Guitar World</em> picks the 10 essential country shred guitar songs. </p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><strong>Joe Maphis, “Flying Fingers”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Flying Fingers</em></strong></p> <p>The link between blazing acoustic bluegrass and electrified country shred began with Joe Maphis and his furious flatpicking on songs like “Flying Fingers,” which he recorded in 1956. </p> <p>Maphis played both the six-string track and overdubbed octave-guitar unison track using both necks of his custom Mosrite double-neck guitar. During the Fifties, Maphis frequently performed on the <em>Town Hall/Ranch Party</em> television program, shredding the strings along with guests that included Ricky Nelson and a 12-year-old Larry Collins.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/AXarnqkkpPk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Phil Baugh, “Country Guitar”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Live Wire</em></strong></p> <p>Phil Baugh’s original <em>Country Guitar</em> album released in 1965 features numerous dazzling instrumentals, like “The Finger,” but the centerpiece is the title track where he performs uncanny imitations of several guitarists, including Chet Atkins, Billy Byrd, Hank Garland, Les Paul and Merle Travis, who all are worthy of inclusion on this list. </p> <p>Baugh played on Merle Haggard’s early Bakersfield singles during the Sixties and during the Seventies moved to Nashville, where he played on sessions for countless hit records.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/nwws6XPZ1JM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Jimmy Bryant, “Down Yonder”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Fastest Guitar in the Country</em></strong></p> <p>Jimmy Bryant (guitar) and Speedy West (pedal steel) recorded incredible instrumental duets during the Fifties that still sound amazing, but Bryant also released some great, overlooked albums on his own during the Sixties. </p> <p>“Down Yonder” from the aptly titled <em>Fastest Guitar in the Country</em> album downplays his usual jazzy flourishes in favor of genuine country twang played in Bryant’s inimitable lightning fast style. Bonus points for the ultra-cool Voxmobile on the cover, which Batmobile and Dragula designer George Barris built for Bryant. </p> <p>Note: Since “Down Yonder” isn't available on YouTube at the moment, we've provided a clip of Bryant and West's "Frettin' Fingers" instead. Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ysuei7pagTw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Albert Lee, “Fun Ranch Boogie”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Gagged But Not Bound</em></strong></p> <p>“Country Boy,” which Lee first recorded with Head Hands &amp; Feet in 1971, has become his signature tune, but this song also provides fine examples of Lee’s ultra-precise banjo-style hybrid picking and tasteful melodic sensibilities. </p> <p>“Albert Lee always sounds like Albert Lee,” Brad Paisley says in the May 2013 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. “His style has evolved into more of a Strat-based sound using the bridge and middle pickup than the twangy Tele tone he used to play.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/iywt3tbGbSE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Steve Morse, “John Deere Letter”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Out Standing in Their Field</em></strong></p> <p>Morse has usually included at least one bona fide country shred tune on his albums going all the way back to his recordings with the Dixie Dregs in the Seventies (“Gina Lola Breakdown” and “Pride O’ the Farm” being great examples). </p> <p>This song from his latest Steve Morse Band effort proves that his hyperspeed chicken pickin’ keeps getting better.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/EG9R0JFJECo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Hellecasters, “Orange Blossom Special”</strong><br /> <strong><em>The Return of the Hellecasters</em></strong></p> <p>Emerging toward the tail end of the shred phenomenon in the early Nineties, this all-star guitar trio consisting of Jerry Donahue, John Jorgenson and Will Ray showed that country boys could not only play as well as the rockers, but they could also do it with a lot more style, originality, humor and panache. </p> <p>“It’s hard to beat the Hellecasters,” Paisley says. “John Jorgenson is my number-one favorite guitarist. He’s what I’m trying to be.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/snS4u6K5NbY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Michael Lee Firkins, “Big Red”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Chapter Eleven</em></strong></p> <p>Most of the tracks that Firkins recorded in the Nineties fit perfectly with the Shrapnel label’s then-current roster of metal/fusion players, but this Nebraska born-and-bred player couldn’t resist revealing his country and bluegrass chops on occasion. </p> <p>This track is one of his more straight-up country jams, with clean tone as sharp as a Bowie knife.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/kuUJkdiV_Z8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Johnny Hiland, “Barnyard Breakdown”</strong><br /> <strong><em>All Fired Up</em></strong></p> <p>One of the most impressive guitarists to emerge on the Nashville scene in recent years, Hiland can be heard tearing it up with Hank Williams III, on sessions with Toby Keith, Randy Travis and others, and even in downtown Nashville’s Lower Broadway honky-tonks.</p> <p>Hiland can play any style of music better than most, but when it comes to country he’s simply untouchable.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/U5t2ivu2qb8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Brad Paisley, “Cluster Pluck”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Play—The Guitar Album</em></strong></p> <p>This instrumental jam featuring Paisley, James Burton, Vince Gill, Albert Lee, John Jorgenson, Brent Mason, Redd Volkaert and Steve Wariner provides a great introduction to almost every current country shredder you should know. </p> <p>“Those guys are all my influences,” Paisley says. “Nobody really outplays anybody else, but when James put on his fingerpicks and did all those bends, double bends and weird arpeggios, I knew that everybody in the room wanted to be him.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/A6BJ2E8eKww" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Marty Stuart, “Hollywood Boogie”</strong><br /> <strong><em>Nashville, Volume 1: Tear the Woodpile Down</em></strong></p> <p>The incredible Kenny Vaughan and legendary Marty Stuart go head-to-head on this blazing instrumental that pays tribute to the Fifties recordings of Joe Maphis and Jimmy Bryant while adding their own modern flourishes. </p> <p>Playing Clarence White’s iconic Telecaster, Stuart’s tone remains the ultimate definition of “twang.”</p> <p><strong>NOTE: In the video below, the action begins around 1:10, so you might want to skip ahead.</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/r0SDGYSWq_M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/fastest-guitars-country-10-essential-country-shred-guitar-songs#comments Articles Brad Paisley GW Archive Jimmy Bryant Joe Maphis Johnny Hiland May 2013 Michael Lee Firkins Guitar World Lists News Features Magazine Wed, 02 Sep 2015 15:24:55 +0000 Chris Gill 18495 at http://www.guitarworld.com "Boogie Uproar" — The Up-Tempo Soloing Style of Clarence "Gatemouth" Brown http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-signature-tempo-soloing-style-clarence-gatemouth-brown <!--paging_filter--><p>Sixty years ago, barely a decade into the electric guitar era, Clarence “Gatemouth” Brown unleashed one of the wildest guitar instrumentals ever captured on record. </p> <p>“Boogie Uproar” was just that, a dose of pure, in-your-face electric energy that musically linked the past—the sophistication of swing—to the future: the raw ferocity of rock and roll.</p> <p>Brown launched his career in 1947 on the heels of fellow Texas guitarist T-Bone Walker, the original architect of the electric blues guitar single-note soloing style. While influenced by Walker, Brown favored a far more aggressive barehanded attack through a cranked-up amp, a sound that he further enhanced by ditching his hollowbody Gibson L-5 for the radical new Telecaster. </p> <p>Combined with an impeccable sense of rhythm and a wild imagination, the result was a distinctive, white-knuckled style that inspired players like Guitar Slim, Johnny “Guitar” Watson and Albert Collins.</p> <p>“Boogie Uproar” is essentially a musical sparring match between Brown and various members of his band over a fast 12-bar blues in G. The main theme (similar to <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>) is a syncopated twist on the standard jump blues walking-bass pattern. </p> <p>To emulate Brown’s sound and playing approach, capo at the third fret, in which case all notes tabbed at the third fret are equivalent to open strings, and pluck aggressively with your bare thumb and fingers to create a dynamic, percussive attack.</p> <p> One of the prime lessons of “Boogie,” and of Brown’s style in general, is the importance of a strong opening phrase. Each of his five solo choruses opens with a distinctive idea, ranging from classic blues (similar to <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>) to pure energy (<strong>FIGURE 3</strong>; note the unorthodox fingering and the recommended picking pattern) to twisted (a rubbery bass-string lick like <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>) to silly (“Here Comes the Bride”) to mocking (a playground taunt, like the first four bars of <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>). </p> <p>Once we’re hooked, Brown can opt either to stretch the same idea or switch to more interchangeable phrases (similar to the last eight bars of <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>) while preparing the next treat.</p> <p>Brown’s more restrained 1954 instrumental masterpiece “Okie Dokie Stomp” would ultimately become his signature tune, but few moments in guitar history match the pure reckless enthusiasm of “Boogie Uproar.” It’s a one-finger salute from a true American original.</p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F4322126%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-JNGFE"></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Talkin%27%20Blues-%20May%202013.png" width="600" height="511" alt="Talkin' Blues- May 2013.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Talkin%27%20Blues-%20May%202013%202.png" width="600" height="470" alt="Talkin' Blues- May 2013 2.png" /></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/tkKzSJeRWt0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/talkin-blues-signature-tempo-soloing-style-clarence-gatemouth-brown#comments Clarence Gatemouth Brown Keith Wyatt May 2013 Talkin' Blues Lessons Magazine Tue, 01 Sep 2015 21:10:03 +0000 Keith Wyatt 18093 at http://www.guitarworld.com Rex Brown Recalls the Making of Pantera's 'Cowboys from Hell,' 'Vulgar Display of Power' and More http://www.guitarworld.com/rex-brown-recalls-making-cowboys-hell-vulgar-display-power-and-other-legendary-pantera-albums <!--paging_filter--><p><em>From the May 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World.</p> <p>While Pantera vocalist Philip Anselmo and the Abbott Brothers—guitarist Dimebag Darrell and drummer Vinnie Paul—were flinging insults at each other in the press throughout 2003, bassist Rex Brown remained largely silent. </p> <p>His ex-bandmates viciously blamed each other for the demise of Pantera, the band that held the torch aloft for metal throughout the Nineties and paved the way for metalcore. </p> <p>But Brown refused to choose sides. By then, he and Anselmo were performing together in Down, and fans might have expected he would take the singer’s side. But Brown continued to say nothing. Instead, he let the resounding notes of his bass express the pain and frustration he felt for what had become of his band. </p> <p>“Vinnie drew this imaginary line in the sand,” explains Brown, who is currently wrapping up the second album by his new band, Kill Devil Hill. </p> <p>“He said, ‘You’re either on our side or not.’ I didn’t want to take sides. Every fucking day before Dime was killed [in December 2004], Vinnie would email me when Phil would say something stupid in the press and go, ‘See what your boy said?’ I was like, ‘Dude, why is he my boy? Because I wanted to get out of your bus because you were throwing fucking tacos at everybody because you’d lost your mind on booze?’ The whole thing was ridiculous, but I never talked about it.”</p> <p>Until now. In his revealing memoir, <em>Official Truth 101 Proof: The Inside Story of Pantera</em>, Brown stops short of blaming anyone for Pantera’s breakup and the subsequent murder of Dimebag Darrell. Instead, he and co-writer Mark Eglinton spend the majority of the book addressing the formation and development of Pantera through five legendary albums. In the process, Brown analyzes how four musicians that were once closer than most families grew apart because of their differences in personality, musical tastes and choice of extracurricular activities. </p> <p>Brown has particularly strong recollections of the six major-label albums he recorded with Pantera. In this <em>Guitar World</em> interview, he gives us an unvarnished, no-holds-barred look at the making of those records and of his life with the original Cowboys from Hell. </p> <p><strong>Cowboys from Hell (1990)</strong></p> <p>While we were writing the songs for <em>Cowboys from Hell</em>, we were listening to a lot of different kinds of music—a lot of Metallica, Slayer, Mercyful Fate and Minor Threat—and that changed our sound. We had grown such a huge following in Texas by then that we could play one set a night and draw 2,000 people. Since we didn’t have to play six shows a night anymore, we had more time to spend in the Abbotts’ studio [Pantego Sound], and we became total perfectionists. </p> <p>Vinnie would lay down all the drums, then Dime would play guitar. We’d put the bass on last. We turned all the drum channels off, and I just played along with Dime’s track. That became known as “the microscope.” If something was off, we’d get a razorblade and cut and splice the tape. We didn’t have Pro Tools back then. And that’s what created our trademark sound, where the guitar and bass are just spot-on. </p> <p>By that point, Dime had already surpassed all of his influences as a player, and we were making a lot of money playing Friday and Saturday nights within a radius of Dallas, Houston, Austin, San Antonio, Shreveport and New Orleans. Then, after getting turned down 29 times, we finally got signed to Atco. The thing is, that actually made our financial situation worse at first. We weren’t playing shows, so we didn’t have any money coming in. So I had to get a job. Me and our lighting guy, Sonny, got gigs putting up lights for fashion shows. It actually turned out real cool. We met all these fashion models, got laid all the time and made a month’s rent a night. </p> <p>But playing with Pantera back then was even better. We were such good friends, and our chemistry was undeniable. Dime would make these riff tapes on his four-track and bring them in, and we’d turn them into songs. One day, Dime came in with this tape loop of a lick he played over and over in a high register. It drove us crazy, because he wouldn’t stop playing it. That’s what became “Cowboys from Hell,” and it was the start of the power groove every band follows today. </p> <p>As much as you still hear that song, when it came out no radio stations would play it. One of my favorite memories is when we did “Cemetery Gates.” Dime already had the riff in the song where it starts getting heavy, but we didn’t have an intro. One day, I picked up an acoustic guitar and messed around with a part, which we recorded. </p> <p>We recorded a piano in reverse so that it created this big swell of sound at the end of the section. When we put the acoustic intro together with the heavy part, there it was. That was huge for us, and that’s how all those sessions went. We were all working together with Terry Date, who we liked a lot, even though our first choice was [famed metal producer] Max Norman. But he canceled at the last minute and we got Terry, who we bonded with from the start. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/i97OkCXwotE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Vulgar Display of Power (1992)<strong></strong></strong></p> <p>When we got back from touring for Cowboys, the music scene had changed so drastically. You had Nirvana on one side and Metallica’s Black Album on the other. As good as that record is, it’s no <em>Master of Puppets</em>. We figured this was our chance to be the heaviest game in town. Dime had riffs pouring out of him. He’d bring them in, and it was hard to choose between them, because they were all so good. </p> <p>One time, Dime and Phil walked out and smoked a joint and came back with the idea for “A New Level.” A couple hits of weed and we were all flying. It was so easy to play, but it was the chemistry we had that made it sound so good. That’s how it was with us. I mean, anybody can write something like “Walk,” but to play it like we did, with that groove—that’s pure chemistry. Even “Fucking Hostile” is totally brutal but hooky as hell. </p> <p>This was the second record we did with Terry Date. He and Vinnie worked hand in hand to get the perfect sound, and Dime was writing riffs that were better than any band out there and taking his solos to an entirely new place. That record just came easy. All the riffs on <em>Cowboys</em> had been written by me and Dime. </p> <p>Philip came in with his own ideas on Vulgar, and that made us even heavier. After it was mastered, we had a tape of the record and we put it in a cassette player and played it for everyone at the label, and their jaws hit the fucking ground. If you play an album for someone and they say, “Yeah, man, I fucking love it,” that’s cool. But when nobody says anything after it’s done and they all have blank stares on their faces, and then someone finally says, “Holy shit!” then you know you’ve done something great. </p> <p>As blown away as everyone was by <em>Vulgar Display of Power</em>, it was the tour opening for Skid Row that changed everything for us. Vinnie had met up with them on tour and drank so much that he threw up all over their dressing room. But they had a good time, so they asked us to go on tour with them. </p> <p>Philip was really resistant at first, and I told him, “Look, there’s two ways we can look at this. We can view it the hard way and say, ‘Fuck you all! We’re gonna tear you apart!’ Or we can take the crowd with us every fucking night,” which is what we did. We turned all these hair farmers into Pantera believers. Vulgar was our second real record, so no one could say <em>Cowboys</em> was a fluke. The songs came out at the right time, and we tore it up every night.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/a3JSbOt7CLo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Far Beyond Driven (1994)</strong></p> <p>It would have been easy for us to write another <em>Vulgar Display of Power</em>, but fuck that. We wanted to try something completely different that was even heavier. We moved everything up to Jerry Abbott’s new place in Nashville, and that’s the first time we started taking breaks between recording. We’d do three or four songs, put them on tape, let them sink in and then go back in and do more. </p> <p>That was about the time that Dime started messing around with the Whammy Pedal and Vinnie was getting completely crazy about getting this clicky sound on his drums, and that required a lot of takes and a lot of tweaking our sound. We drove Terry crazy. But we had been playing through the same gear for 500 dates between 1989 and 1994, so we felt it was time for experimentation, and we did tons of takes of everything, which is why it was our most expensive album to do.</p> <p> “I’m Broken” was the first single. That was a classic southern groove, and we remixed that thing 16 times. But we were raging. Take a song like “Good Friends and a Bottle of Pills.” Where the fuck does that come from? Out of the blue! We just bashed it out. Dime came up with a lot of those riffs at soundchecks, and he wrote other ones on the shitter. He always had an acoustic guitar in the bathroom. He’d go in there to take a dump and come out with an amazing song. We also covered Black Sabbath’s “Planet Caravan.” I played keyboards on it and fretless bass. Vinnie played congas. And Dime’s solo…to this day, I can’t listen to it. Just talking about it chokes me up. And Dime did it first take.</p> <p>Everything was happening. We renegotiated our contract with Warner Bros., and they gave us a huge amount of money each. When stuff like that happens, it can either ruin you and wipe the band out or you can bond together, which we did. Part way through the recording, we left Nashville and went back to Dallas Sound Lab, in Texas, and from then on it became one big fuckin’ party. We were boozin’. </p> <p>Vinnie was doing a lot of Ecstasy. Me and Dime were just taking little dabbles here and there, but Vinnie was out of his mind, and he was co-producing this thing, so he’d sometimes get real crazy. It took a long time to finish the overdubs, because the brothers were partying so heavy, but we were still “all for one, one for all,” even though Philip had moved back home to New Orleans when he was done with his vocals. That removed him from the equation, which was probably a good thing. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/2-V8kYT1pvE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>The Great Southern Trendkill (1996)</strong></p> <p>Metal is a full-blown contact sport, especially the way we did it. So it was only a matter of time before Phil was gonna need something for the damage he caused himself. We used to jump 15 feet in the fucking air, and I’d usually land on my feet and feel the shock on my knees, which are shot now. But Philip would make these giant jumps and land on his fuckin’ ass. I used to always think, Fuck, man, that’s gonna hurt later.</p> <p>Back then, we would wake and bake. That was just a given. So that made us a little foggy. But at one point, I noticed Phil was fuzzier than usual. One day when we stared doing <em>The Great Southern Trendkill</em>, he looked at me and slapped his armpit [a technique to inflate a vein prior to shooting heroin]. </p> <p>I went, “What!?” I’ve never stuck a needle in my arm. I used to watch some of my friends shoot up, but I would never do it. No way. I hadn’t seen that reference in 10 years, and Philip doing that at me made me go, Oh shit! I hope he’s not doing what I think he’s doing. </p> <p>Sure enough, he was doing smack. And he was a wreck through the writing sessions of <em>Trendkill.</em> We were all so burned out by that point. A lot of the discipline and structure we used to have went out the window. I’m not crazy about two or three songs on the album, but there’s a lot of good stuff on it. It was all created very spontaneously. We didn’t go back and re-record anything.</p> <p>That record was even more experimental than Far Beyond Driven. Far Beyond still had a coherent structure, and on Trendkill there was hardly any. Dime wasn’t even bringing riff tapes in anymore. So we winged it, and Terry just rolled tape, and a lot of the random stuff we captured is pioneering. And of course, the more we worked on them, the more cohesive the songs became. </p> <p>It was the first time Philip didn’t track vocals with us, which left Dime leery, because he didn’t know what to do with the leads. But he got it done anyway, and it was killer. Just listen to “Floods.” That’s the three of us locked in, and it’s got all these different shades to it and all these dynamics, and Dime’s solo couldn’t be better. In the end, we were psyched about the record, and we toured it to fucking death.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/4hx8TW6sYys" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Reinventing the Steel (2000)</strong></p> <p>Doing that album was closest we’d been in 10 years—since <em>Vulgar</em> or <em>Far Beyond</em>—to capturing what we wanted to do. </p> <p>We went, “Okay, let’s listen back and take the best elements of what we’ve done. Everyone pick your five favorite songs from each album, and let’s roll.” There were four different opinions of what we should do, but we tried to work within those confines, and we did a great record. But what we should have done instead was check into rehab and then, when we were all clean, get a real producer, instead of Vinnie Paul. At this point, Vinnie was trying to take control of everything.</p> <p>His ego went through the roof. He didn’t want Terry Date involved. Where we used to drink for fun, we were drinking out of frustration, and during the sessions we were yelling at each other, throwing shit at each other, breaking stuff. </p> <p>Many times Dime was so fucking drunk, Philip would jump on him, and I’d have to jump on Phil. Somehow we made it through the record, and if you put it next to <em>Far Beyond</em> and <em>Vulgar</em>, you come out with something very close. Take a song like “Revolution Is My Name.” That could have been on <em>Far Beyond Driven</em>. And even though he wasn’t necessarily in a good place, Dime really came out of his hole and delivered. </p> <p>During the recording, Dime had these cases of fucking ginseng. He would drink two or three of these bottles and stay up for days. Dime never did speed, cocaine or heroin. He smoked a lot of weed and did some acid. But he loved ginseng, and it made him fucking crazy. Rehearsal for the tour was surreal. Philip was so wasted, he’d be singing a different song than we were playing. He was always on for the shows, but touring was a nightmare. </p> <p>Dime tried to get his own bus, because he couldn’t stand his own fucking brother anymore. Vinnie just kept booking shows, and we were touring with all the problems that went along with drug and alcohol abuse. Dime would blast the speakers out until 10 in the morning every day. You can’t sleep in a bus like that. So I went to Phil’s bus and stayed in the back lounge. He stayed in the front lounge, and we kept people out. Phil calmed down to a certain extent, even though he was drinking and smoking weed like it was going out of style.</p> <p>We really all should have stopped, but there was so much money on the table, and that made everything worse. We’d drink so fucking hard trying to relieve the tensions of drinking so hard, and that sent everybody into a fucking spiral. After a show, I’d go smoke a joint and drink a glass of wine and go to bed instead of staying up and trying to get laid, which Vinnie was all about but couldn’t make happen. We didn’t know if we were coming or going. We just know we had another gig to do, so goddamn, you get up and you do it. None of us ever missed a show. Ever.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/_XI1DD_vJuY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo: James Bland</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/pantera">Pantera</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/rex-brown-recalls-making-cowboys-hell-vulgar-display-power-and-other-legendary-pantera-albums#comments Dimebag Darrell GW Archive May 2013 Pantera Rex Brown Interviews Features Magazine Fri, 24 Jul 2015 12:22:13 +0000 Jon Wiederhorn 18075 at http://www.guitarworld.com United Stringdom: Combining Sweep Picking and Fretboard Tapping to Forge Long, Flowing Melodic Phrases http://www.guitarworld.com/united-stringdom-combining-sweep-picking-and-fretboard-tapping-forge-long-flowing-melodic-phrases <!--paging_filter--><p>Hi, and welcome to my new <em>Guitar World</em> instructional column. </p> <p>Over the next few months, I’ll be demonstrating to you many of the different techniques I use for the riffs and solos that I play with my band, Falling in Reverse. Hopefully, these riffs will prove useful and inspire you to discover some unique musical ideas of your own. </p> <p>Some of my favorite musical sounds are those that consist of long, flowing arpeggios, whether they are present in rock, classical, electronic music or metal. The manner by which most guitar players execute lengthy arpeggiated lines is by using sweep picking, wherein the pick is dragged in a single motion across two or more adjacent strings using either a downstroke or an upstroke. </p> <p> I like to expand on the standard sweep-picking approach by adding fretboard taps at the highest part of the phrase. As a right-handed player, I use my left hand for fretting and my right hand for picking and tapping. I like to make a correlation between the guitar and the piano, in that my left hand provides the majority of the notes of the arpeggio, as is often the case when playing long arpeggios on the piano, and my right hand likewise adds higher melodic notes, via fretboard tapping.</p> <p> For those new to the fretboard tapping technique, a note is sounded by hammering onto a string with either a pick-hand fingertip or the edge of the pick, after which that note is then pulled off to a lower note on the same string, which is fretted conventionally. I myself prefer to tap with the edge of my pick, à la Randy Rhoads.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> is an uninterrupted 16-bar run that progresses through a series of sweep-picked arpeggios to melodically imply a chord progression: Am G F Em. I ascend and descend each arpeggio four times and incorporate tapping to sound the highest notes, which I vary each time to add melodic interest and harmonic color to the run. The two minor arpeggios, Am and Em, are performed identically but five frets apart. Likewise, the two major arpeggios, G and F, are also executed identically, two frets apart. </p> <p> Each arpeggio begins with a downstroke followed by a hammer-on, after which I continue the downstroke across all of the strings. After sounding the two taps and pull-offs, I descend the arpeggio using an upstroke sweep. I recommend practicing the sweeps alone first before adding the taps. </p> <p>Try to keep the fretted notes separate and distinct by “getting off them” as soon as they’re picked or hammered. These techniques aren’t as difficult to perform as they may seem at first, but they will definitely take practice to master and integrate, so be persistent and patient.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/R_crTeCmpvk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-04%20at%2011.41.17%20AM.png" width="620" height="704" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-04 at 11.41.17 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-04%20at%2011.41.33%20AM.png" width="620" height="215" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-04 at 11.41.33 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/united-stringdom-combining-sweep-picking-and-fretboard-tapping-forge-long-flowing-melodic-phrases#comments Falling In Reverse Jacky Vincent May 2013 United Stringdom Videos Blogs News Features Lessons Magazine Mon, 16 Mar 2015 12:20:14 +0000 Jacky Vincent 18092 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep: Tribute to the Musical Genius and Signature Lead Guitar Style of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>A true original, the late, great virtuoso guitarist Duane Allman led the Allman Brothers Band into rock history with his ferocious, deeply expressive and trailblazing guitar work. </p> <p>Rounder Records offers ample testimony to the beauty as well as the breadth of Duane’s recorded work in the new, beautifully compiled box set <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>. In this edition of In Deep, we will examine some of the key elements of Duane’s signature style as a lead guitarist. </p> <p>One of the best examples of the genius of Duane Allman can be found on the timeless, classic live album, At Fillmore East (1971), which captures the Allman Brothers Band live in concert at the peak of their powers. </p> <p>Duane’s razor-sharp articulation and masterful touch abound, starting with the slide guitar tour de force “Statesboro Blues,” through the smoldering slow blues “Stormy Monday” and continuing through the fiery, aggressive solos performed on “Whipping Post,” “You Don’t Love Me” and other great tracks.</p> <p>Duane’s rich, warm tone was achieved via his main ax, a 1958 tobacco sunburst Gibson Les Paul Standard, played through Marshall<br /> “Plexi” 50- and 100-watt heads, usually running two 4x12 Marshall bottoms. For additional distortion, he very occasionally used a Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face, usually in the studio. </p> <p>A key to Duane’s virtuosity was the fact that, like Jimi Hendrix, he had extensive experience as a session guitarist, working closely alongside R&amp;B greats like Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and King Curtis. Through his studio work, Duane had developed a great sense of rhythm as well as a keen understanding of economy, in terms of phrasing.</p> <p>This understanding resulted in improvised solos that remained cohesive and conversational no matter how long they stretched out or how far they roamed from the original starting point. For this column, let’s use two of Duane’s signature songs, “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post,” as our points of focus.</p> <p>“Stormy Monday,” written and originally recorded by blues great T-Bone Walker, is played in the key of G. For soloing, Duane relied primarily on a few standard “bluesapproved” scales. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a scale most guitar players are well familiar with, G minor pentatonic (G Bf C D F), as played in third position. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates the G blues scale, which is the same as G minor pentatonic but additionally includes the flatted fifth (f5), Df.</p> <p>Most blues players move alternately between minor and major pentatonic scales based on the same root note. Eric Clapton and B.B. King are two great examples of guitarists whose solos are almost always based on a combination of these two scales. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E) in an extended pattern that diagonally traverses the fretboard from third to 12th positions.</p> <p>Duane often used a soloing device that can be traced to B.B. King, one of his biggest influences. King’s signature soloing approach combines the notes of minor and major pentatonic scales in a very specific fretboard pattern, or “shape.” The pattern, known as “B.B.’s box,” is illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. </p> <p>This small handful of notes can be ordered and phrased in nearly an infinite number of ways, resulting in many great blues licks. <strong>FIGURES 5–8</strong> offer four different ways in which Duane would use this shape as a jumping off point to improvised solo ideas.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1%20to%207.png" width="620" height="615" alt="1 to 7.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20to%20something.png" width="620" height="389" alt="8 to something.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202.png" width="839" height="504" alt="8 part 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE OF THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315216001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315216001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><hr /> <p>Now let’s focus on soloing over a 12-bar slow blues form along the lines of “Stormy Monday” and in the style of Duane Allman, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. </p> <p>I begin in bars 1 and 2 with a melodic idea based on G major pentatonic, but in bar 3, I morph into G minor pentatonic by overbending the second, A, up and step and a half to the fourth, C. At the end of bar 4 into bar 5, I apply the overbending technique to E, the sixth, bending that note all the way up to the G root note, repeating the melodic motif into bar 6. </p> <p>When performing these bends, line up additional fingers behind the fretting finger—for example, reinforcing the ring finger with the middle finger or both the middle and index—to help it push the string. Doing so will give you better pitch control and stability when bending. The same is true for bend vibratos.</p> <p>Throughout the remainder of the example, I limit my movement to the eighth and 10th positions to demonstrate that a great amount of melodic invention can be found without moving up and down the fretboard. The intent here is to create lines that are expressive and vocal-like while also evoking a bit of the Duane-like focused intensity.</p> <p>For his “Whipping Post” solo, Duane drew primarily from the A Dorian mode (A B C D E Fs G), two fretboard patterns of which are shown in <strong>FIGURES 10 and 11</strong>. Both patterns are very useful for soloing, so you’ll want to memorize them thoroughly.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 12</strong> offers an eight-bar solo along the lines of Duane’s “Whipping Post” solo. The song is played in 12/8 meter, which affords a lot of room for rhythmic creativity, and Duane made the most of the opportunity every time he played it. I begin this solo with a wholestep bend from the A root up to the second, B, followed by subtle movement down through the notes of the A Dorian mode. </p> <p>In bar 2, I play a quick repeated hammer/pull phrase that emphasizes two notes of a G major triad (G and B) before moving into a line based on A minor pentatonic (A C D E G).</p> <p>Bar 5 offers a unique rhythmic superimposition that Duane used often. Another classic Duane-ism is illustrated in bar 7, as quick pulloffs on the top three strings alternate back and forth in an ascending-and-descending manner.</p> <p>Try using your index and ring fingers to execute this phrase as well as your index and middle fingers and index and pinkie, or a combination of any of these. The aim should be, as always, clarity in execution.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/end.png" width="620" height="651" alt="end.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315196001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315196001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243325650001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243325650001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202_0.png" width="620" height="372" alt="8 part 2_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep May 2013 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:54:36 +0000 Andy Aledort 18091 at http://www.guitarworld.com Petal to the Metal: The Minarik Orchid Guitar http://www.guitarworld.com/petal-metal-minarik-orchid-guitar <!--paging_filter--><p>The solidbody guitar is essentially a blank canvas, a quality that often results in some rather bizarre designs, such as the instruments regularly featured here. </p> <p>Occasionally, however, form and function coalesce to produce an instrument that not only looks cool but also offers enhanced tone benefits. That’s how Minarik describes its new Orchid model, which looks like a delicate flower with its orchid-inspired “petals” and thin “stamen” extensions, which also are designed to function similar to tuning forks.</p> <p>“When we designed our Inferno model, we discovered that having extended pieces of the wood body hanging in air offered tonal possibilities that other guitars do not have,” Mark Minarik says. “With the Orchid model, we designed different-sized protrusions, combined with trademark tone chambering that allows those wood pieces to act as tuning forks that enhance different frequencies based on their size and location. The design gives the guitar a wider tonal rainbow.”</p> <p>With its numerous curves, body extensions, neck-through-body design, arched top and what seems like a mile of binding surrounding abalone purfling, the Orchid provides Minarik with more building challenges than the average solidbody.</p> <p>“The contoured arch top is very difficult to craft toward the stamen and leaves,” he says. “Also, the corner pieces by the upper horns drop below the body line. There are three different levels on this body that blend seamlessly. This example also has an Alice in Wonderland fretboard inlay that is very intricate and spectacular. You really have to look at it up close to appreciate all the detail and work that went into it.”</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://minarikguitars.com/">minarikguitars.com</a>.</p> http://www.guitarworld.com/petal-metal-minarik-orchid-guitar#comments Articles GW Archive It Might Get Weird May 2013 Minarik Electric Guitars Galleries News Features Gear Magazine Mon, 30 Dec 2013 13:58:49 +0000 Chris Gill 18085 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Epiphone Spaceman Tommy Thayer Signature Les Paul http://www.guitarworld.com/review-epiphone-spaceman-tommy-thayer-signature-les-paul <!--paging_filter--><p>If the Kiss Army were to appoint a general, it would have to be the band’s lead guitarist, Tommy “Spaceman” Thayer. </p> <p>Long before he donned Ace Frehley’s iconic makeup and became the band’s official ax master in 2003, Thayer had already developed an impressive service record with the group, included writing and recording demos with Gene Simmons, managing the 1995 Kiss Worldwide Convention Tour and working as producer and editor on the Kiss films <em>The Second Coming, Detroit Rock City</em> and <em>The Last Kiss</em>. </p> <p>Thayer’s signature Epiphone Spaceman continues his tradition of stellar contributions to the Kiss legacy. It’s a souped-up tour de force of tone and certainly one of the most thrilling and well-balanced Les Pauls created in recent years. In addition to featuring a pair of Gibson’s hotter 498T pickups, it has an ultra-cool retro-style silver-flake finish. Epiphone is making only 1,000 of the limited-edition Spaceman, and at a street price under $700, they’re sure to go fast. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong> </p> <p>Epiphone’s Spaceman is a true example of harmonious design, where each component’s special tonal characteristics purposely and appropriately complement the instrument’s ultimate response and sound. Vintage-style Grover tuners contribute to precise note definition, the thin maple top adds just the right amount of bright bite on top of the mahogany’s naturally thick midrange, and the deep-set, Sixties-style mahogany neck and LockTone Tune-O-Matic/stop-bar bridge provide extra sustain. </p> <p>Playability across the rosewood fretboard’s 12-inch radius is Les Paul perfect (low action and tight string snap), and each Spaceman comes with a custom silver hard case, signed certificate, Epiphone strap locks and Tommy Thayer edition studded strap.</p> <p>Gibson 498T pickups produce the Spaceman’s fiery combination of punch and crunch. Focusing on tone over a uniform appearance, Epiphone and Thayer placed a covered version in the neck position and an open-bobbin style in the lead. The cover slightly alters harmonic peaks and overtones, enough so that the pickups will harmonize when played together rather than sound muddy or washed out. </p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>I had a hard time putting the Spaceman down long enough to write this review. I was absolutely entranced by its rare combination of spacious note separation and sustain. More than so many other guitars, it captured my musical intent and clarified difficult passages, elevating my performance and confidence. My favorite tones came from using the 498T pickups in unison. They blended seamlessly, leaving no tonal gaps and producing an energetic mix of attack, three-dimensional imaging and midrange howl.</p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong> </p> <p>Kiss fan or not, whatever your musical style, Epiphone’s Spaceman Tommy Thayer signature Les Paul defines the modern classic ideal. </p> <p><strong>List Price</strong> $1,165.00</p> <p><strong>Manufacturer</strong> Epiphone Guitar Corp., <a href="http://www.epiphone.com/default.aspx?">epiphone.com</a></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243367438001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243367438001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/kiss">Kiss</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-epiphone-spaceman-tommy-thayer-signature-les-paul#comments Epiphone Kiss May 2013 Tommy Thayer Electric Guitars News Gear Magazine Tue, 22 Oct 2013 16:51:06 +0000 Eric Kirkland, Video by Paul Riario 18080 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Marshall DSL15C and DSL40C Combo Amps http://www.guitarworld.com/review-marshall-dsl15c-and-dsl40c-combo-amps <!--paging_filter--><p>There are many different shades of the Marshall sound, but every Marshall amp—from the Plexi through the JCM800 and Jubilee to the latest JVM models—delivers a certain instantly identifiable quality of tone, crunch and distortion. </p> <p>That unmistakable Marshall character is very alive and well in the company’s latest DSL models, which deliver an incredible variety of classic and modern Marshall tones at exceptionally affordable prices, offering possibly the best value of any tube amp line in Marshall’s long, illustrious history.</p> <p>The four latest additions to the DSL line include the DSL15H 15-watt head, the DSL15C 15-watt 1x10 combo, DSL40C 40-watt 1x12 combo and the DSL100H 100-watt head. Each boasts all-tube circuitry, a dual-channel design, full/half power switch, digital reverb and more. Amazing, each sells for a street price of under $1,000. For this review, I tried out the two combo models—the DSL15C and DSL40C—which deliver impressive power in portable packages.</p> <p><strong>Features</strong> </p> <p>Both the DSL15C and DSL40C share certain features, but a handful of differences beyond power output and speaker size are worthy of consideration if choosing between the two. The DSL15C has an ECC83 (12AX7) and a pair of 6V6 power amp tubes, and it has three ECC83 tubes in the preamp section; the DSL40C uses two EL34 tubes for the power amp instead of 6V6s. </p> <p>The DSL40C has a slight edge in versatility, especially for guitarists who plan on using the amp onstage, thanks to two selectable modes per channel (Clean/Crunch for the Classic Gain channel, and Lead 1/Lead 2 for the Ultra Gain channel), a resonance control, individual reverb level controls for each channel and a series effect loop. Instead of a resonance control, the DSL15C offers a deep switch. The DSL40C has a Celestion Seventy 80 12-inch speaker, while the DSL15C comes with a Celestion G12E-60 10-inch speaker. The DSL40C also weighs about 15 pounds more than the DSL15C.</p> <p>Common features of both amps include Classic Gain and Ultra Gain channels, each of which has its own gain and volume controls but shares a single set of treble, middle, bass and presence controls and a tone shift switch that scoops the midrange when engaged. A footswitch with individual switches for selecting the channel and bypassing reverb also comes with both models. The rear panels of both models provide a pentode/triode switch (for full- or half-power settings), a footswitch jack, a single 16-ohm speaker output jack, and two eight-ohm speaker output jacks. </p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>The two selectable modes per channel on the DSL40C give it a slight edge in versatility compared to the DSL15C, but both combos provide a full selection of Marshall tones, including sparkling clean, raunchy crunch, aggressive overdrive and ultraviolent modern metal distortion. </p> <p>The biggest differences are that the DSL40C’s Crunch setting provides more overdrive than is available from the DSL15C’s Classic Gain channel and the Lead 2 setting adds thicker midrange than you can get from the DSL15C’s Ultra Gain channel. However, thanks to its 6V6 tubes, the DSL15C’s distortion tones are slightly more dynamic, tight and harmonically complex compared to the somewhat compressed and darker tones of the DSL40C’s EL34 tubes. </p> <p>The tone controls on both models offer much greater tonal range than the average guitar amp, with the treble and presence controls providing particularly sharp, brilliant textures past the one o’clock mark. However, the added range actually makes it easier to dial in pretty much any tone one desires, from the razor-sharp cut of Kerry King’s thrash tones to the hammer-of-the-gods bottom-end punch of James Hetfield’s Ride the Lightning rhythm guitars. Although the combos’ cabinets have open-back designs, the resonance control (DSL40C) and the deep switch (DSL15C) allow these amps to deliver tight, focused bass similar to that of a closed-back 4x12 cabinet.</p> <p>Both amps are loud enough for small gigs or miking through a sound system, and the half-power settings make either ideal for playing at more moderate volume levels at home. The DSL40C is a better choice for playing live, thanks to its more powerful output, effect loop and individual reverb controls, while the DSL15C is a studio powerhouse that provides a lifetime’s worth of awesome Marshall tones that are perfect for recording.</p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet</strong></p> <p><strong>List Prices</strong> DSL15C, $840; DSL40C, $970<br /> MANUFACTURER Marshall Amplification, <a href="http://marshallamps.com/">marshallamps.com</a></p> <p>The DSL15C features one ECC83 and two 6V6 tubes in the power amp section, while the DSL40C features one ECC83 and two EL34 tubes.</p> <p>Both combos feature a shared EQ section for both channels, a Classic Gain channel, an Ultra Gain channel, a tone shift switch, digital spring reverb and a pentode/triode switch.</p> <p>The DSL40C adds a Clean/Crunch mode switch for the Classic Gain channel, Lead 1/Lead 2 mode switch for the Ultra Gain channel, and effect loop, resonance control and individual reverb controls for each channel.</p> <p>Both models include a controller with two footswitches for selecting channels and turning reverb on or off. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong> </p> <p>Marshall’s new DSL Series combos deliver an impressive variety of classic and modern Marshall tones in compact, portable packages that are perfect for the stage or studio.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243384742001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243384742001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-marshall-dsl15c-and-dsl40c-combo-amps#comments Marshall Amplification May 2013 Amps News Gear Magazine Thu, 10 Oct 2013 17:01:00 +0000 Chris Gill, Video by Paul Riario 18079 at http://www.guitarworld.com Praise the Loud! Guitar World Delivers Sonic Salvation with a Host of Divine and Almighty Amplifiers http://www.guitarworld.com/praise-loud-guitar-world-delivers-sonic-salvation-host-divine-and-almighty-amplifiers <!--paging_filter--><p>Praise the Loud!</p> <p><em>Guitar World</em> delivers sonic salvation with a heavenly host of divine and almighty amplifiers. </p> <p>Note that the amps' prices and websites are provided below. Be sure to check out the photo gallery at the bottom of this story for photos and brief descriptions of all the amps in the story.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><strong>01. Blackstar Amplification Limited-Edition Arctic White HT-5R and HT-1R tube amps</strong><br /> STREET PRICES HT-5RW combo, $499.99; HT-1RW combo, $319.99; HT-5RSW mini stack, $779.99; HT-5RHW head, $429.99; HT-112W cabinet, $219.99; <a href="http://www.blackstaramps.com/">blackstaramps.com</a></p> <p><strong>02. Orange Twin-Channel OR100 </strong><br /> LIST PRICE $2,199; <a href="http://www.orangeamps.com/">orangeamps.com</a></p> <p><strong>03. Carvin Legacy 3</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $899; <a href="http://www.carvinguitars.com/">carvinguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>04. Budda AS Preceptor </strong><br /> LIST PRICE $3,899; <a href="http://budda.com/">budda.com</a></p> <p><Strong>05. Fender ’57 Bandmaster</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $3,399.99; <a href="http://www.fender.com/series/custom/57-bandmaster/">fender.com/series/custom/57-bandmaster/</a></p> <p><strong>06. Hughes &amp; Kettner TubeMeister 36 Combo </strong><br /> LIST PRICE $1,499; Street Price, $1,199; <a href="http://hughes-and-kettner.com/">hughes-and-kettner.com</a></p> <p><strong>07. Pritchard Sword of Satori </strong><br /> LIST PRICE $2,300 (as shown); <a href="pritchardamps.com">pritchardamps.com</a></p> <p><strong>08. Marshall Slash Signature SL5</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $970; <a href="marshallamps.com">marshallamps.com</a></p> <p><strong>09. Quilter Labs Aviator</strong><br /> LIST PRICES Ultralight Eight, $699; Open Twelve, $899; Twin Ten, $949; <a href="http://www.quilterlabs.com/">Quilterlabs.com</a></p> <p><strong>10. Ibanez TSA30H Tube Screamer 30-watt head</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $599.99; <a href="http://www.ibanez.com/default.aspx">ibanez.com</a></p> <p>11. Fishman Loudbox Performer Acoustic Instrument Amplifier<br /> LIST PRICE $1,184.53; Street Price, $769.95; <a href="http://www.fishman.com/">fishman.com</a></p> <p><strong>12. Randall RD Diavlo Series </strong><br /> STREET PRICE $249.99; <a href="http://www.randallamplifiers.com/diavlo-series/">randallamplifiers.com/diavlo-series</a></p> <p><strong>13. PRS 2 Channel Custom 50 and 100</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $1,999; MAP, $1,799; <a href="http://prsguitars.com/2channelcustom/">prsguitars.com/2channelcustom</a></p> <p><strong>14. Peavey ValveKings </strong><br /> LIST PRICES ValveKing II Micro Head, $499; ValveKing II Head, $899; ValveKing II Combo 20 $749; ValveKing II Combo 50, $799; <a href="http://peavey.com/">peavey.com</a></p> <p><strong>15. Roland Cube Lite</strong><br /> STREET PRICE $169; <a href="http://www.rolandus.com/">rolandus.com</a></p> <p><strong>16. Carr Impala</strong><br /> LIST PRICES 
1x12 combo, $2,490; head, $2,390; <a href="http://carramps.com/products/impala">carramps.com/products/impala</a></p> <p><strong>17. Schecter Hellwin USA 100 head</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $3,699; <a href="http://schecterguitars.com/Default.aspx">schecterguitars.com</a></p> <p><strong>18. Traynor YGL1 15-watt All-Tube 1x12 combo</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $849; Street Price, $599; <a href="http://traynoramps.com/">traynoramps.com</a></p> <p><strong>19. Vox Mini5 Rhythm</strong><br /> LIST PRICE $225; Street Price, $159.99; <a href="http://www.voxamps.com/">voxamps.com</a></p> <p><strong>20. Yamaha THR Series </strong><br /> LIST PRICES THR10X, $460; THR10C, $460; THR5A, $330; <a href="http://usa.yamaha.com/">usa.yamaha.com</a></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/praise-loud-guitar-world-delivers-sonic-salvation-host-divine-and-almighty-amplifiers#comments May 2013 Amps News Features Gear Magazine Mon, 30 Sep 2013 12:24:56 +0000 Guitar World Staff 18430 at http://www.guitarworld.com Review: Zoom MS-100BT Multistomp Pedal with Bluetooth http://www.guitarworld.com/review-zoom-ms-100bt-multistomp-pedal-bluetooth <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the May 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=videospage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>Zoom makes such a wide variety of products these days that it’s easy to forget the company debuted way back in 1989 with the 9002, a tiny, guitar-strap-mounted multieffect processor a little larger than a pack of cigarettes. Now, 24 years later, things have come full circle with Zoom’s new Multistomp pedals, which provide the power and functionality of a sophisticated multieffect processor in a package that’s the size of a standard stomp box. </p> <p>The MS-100BT Multistomp is Zoom’s most powerful Multistomp pedal. It offers 100 preloaded effects and amp models, the ability to download new effects and models via Bluetooth and the StompShare app for iOS devices (iPad, iPhone and iPod Touch), and much more. </p> <p><strong>Features</strong></p> <p>Although the Zoom MS-100BT looks like an average single-effect stomp box with a footswitch, three knobs and stereo I/O, it’s actually a powerful multieffect processor that provides up to six simultaneous effects. The only significant difference between the MS-100BT and a full-size multieffect floor unit is a lack of additional switches and foot controllers for selecting patches and manually adjusting parameters. The six available effects can be arranged in any order, and the pedal’s internal memory stores 50 patches. </p> <p>You can set up the footswitch to function several different ways, including as a bypass switch for individual effects in a patch, to scroll through a pre-selected series of patches, to manually tap tempo settings, or to mute the output when the tuner function is engaged. Four cursor keys surrounding the footswitch let you select effect categories, change the effect type, display an effect and add a new effect left or right of the current effect. Three control knobs, which also function as push switches, perform a variety of functions, such as editing parameters and selecting patches. </p> <p>The stock internal effects and amp models cover just about everything a guitarist could need, from standard tools (overdrive, noise gate and so on) to outrageous special effects (sequence filter, bit crusher, bomber and more). Effects are arranged in five groups (dynamics/filter, overdrive/distortion, amp, modulation/SFX, delay/reverb), allowing you to access what you want more quickly. </p> <p>In addition, Zoom currently offers an additional 13 effects and 12 amps for sale via its StompShare Shop. These effects and amps can be downloaded to the pedal via a wireless Bluetooth connection using the free StompShare app for iOS devices. The StompShare app also offers a free 15-minute trial download of each effect and amp model. Each effect costs only 99 cents, while each amp model is priced at $1.99, which means you can increase the available sounds of an MS-100BT by 25 percent for less than $40.</p> <p><strong>Performance</strong> </p> <p>Using and programming the MS-100BT is satisfyingly simple, thanks to the intuitive control layout and large graphic display. While guitarists who like to randomly access patches or individual effects will still be better off with a dedicated floor unit, players who only need to turn an individual effect on and off during a song or already have a preconceived string of sounds in mind for a set or song will find that the pedal satisfies their needs quite well. The pedal does not perform a traditional on/off bypass, instead being designed for use as a primary tone source that is always on, although you can use a loop selector should you only need it for a few songs during a set like a standard stomp box.</p> <p>The sound quality of the effects and amp models matches that of Zoom’s larger multieffect units. The optional StompShare amp models are all impressive and worth the additional $1.99, and the StompShare effects, which include models of the Maestro Echoplex, Ibanez Tube Screamer and legendary Klon Centaur, are incredible bargains at only 99 cents each. These items alone make the MS-100BT an essential purchase for any tech-savvy tone junkie.</p> <p><strong>Cheat Sheet</strong></p> <p><strong>List Price</strong> $249.99</p> <p><strong>Manufacturer</strong> Zoom Corporation, samsontech.com</p> <p>A powerful multieffect processor with six simultaneous effects that can be arranged in any order, 100 effects and amp models, and 50 patches.</p> <p>Additional effects and amp models can be downloaded via an iOS device using a wireless Bluetooth connection and Zoom’s StompShare app. </p> <p><strong>The Bottom Line</strong> </p> <p>Packing the power of a floor multieffect unit into a stomp-box configuration, the MS-100BT is perfect for guitarists who want sophisticated sounds from the smallest stage rig imaginable.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243363833001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243363833001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/review-zoom-ms-100bt-multistomp-pedal-bluetooth#comments May 2013 Zoom Effects News Gear Magazine Wed, 05 Jun 2013 11:41:03 +0000 Guitar World Staff 18082 at http://www.guitarworld.com May 2013 Guitar World: Electric Cowboy Brad Paisley, Rex Brown Talks Pantera, Stephen Stills, New Amp Roundup and More http://www.guitarworld.com/may-2013-guitar-world-electric-cowboy-brad-paisley-rex-brown-talks-pantera-stephen-stills-new-amp-roundup-and-more <!--paging_filter--><p>The all-new May 2012 issue of <em>Guitar World</em> magazine is available now!</p> <p>This month's cover star is none other than Brad Paisley.</p> <p><strong>Brad Paisley</strong> put the shred into country guitar with his fast-as-lightning licks. Now he moves beyond his southern comfort zone with <em>Wheelhouse</em>, his new album of genre-bending tunes. Plus, <em>Guitar World</em> picks the 10 essential country shred guitar songs, 10 pieces of gear that are essential to modern country tone, the story of Ken Fischer's Trainwreck amps, makers of Paisley's cherished Liverpool "Hattie Mae" and Rocket "Marcy" heads.</p> <p>Pantera bassist <strong>Rex Brown</strong> recalls the wonderful, wild and weird tales behind the making of <em>Cowboys from Hell, Vulgar Display of Power</em> and other legendary Pantera albums. </p> <p>Folk-rock icon <strong>Stephen Stills</strong> reflects on Buffalo Springfield, CSN&amp;Y and the super sessions behind the songs on his new career retrospective box set, <em>Carry On</em>.</p> <p>How do real thrashers prepare for a night of headbanging? Testament's <strong>Alex Skolnick and Eric Peterson</strong> give a behind-the-scenes look at their typical show-day routine, from load in to soundcheck to show time.</p> <p><strong>Four Songs with Tabs for Guitar and Bass!</strong></p> <p>• Pantera, "Drag the Waters"<br /> • CSN&amp;Y, "4 + 20"<br /> • Alice In Chains, "Would?"<br /> • Brad Paisley, "Sharp Dressed Man"</p> <p>... and much, much more! </p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=GWMAY13">The May 2013 issue of Guitar World is available now at the Guitar World Online Store!</a></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-03-26%20at%2011.20.47%20AM.png" width="620" height="808" alt="Screen Shot 2013-03-26 at 11.20.47 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/may-2013-guitar-world-electric-cowboy-brad-paisley-rex-brown-talks-pantera-stephen-stills-new-amp-roundup-and-more#comments Brad Paisley May 2013 News Features Magazine Thu, 18 Apr 2013 11:47:21 +0000 Guitar World Staff 18186 at http://www.guitarworld.com Folk Icon Stephen Stills Reflects on Buffalo Springfield, CSN&Y and His New Box Set, 'Carry On' http://www.guitarworld.com/folk-icon-stephen-stills-reflects-buffalo-springfield-csny-and-his-new-box-set-carry <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the May 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> magazine. For the rest of this story, plus features on Brad Paisley, Testament, Tommy Thayer, Children of Bodum, Steven Wilson and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=StillsExcerpt">check out the issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p>“You can’t fit me onto three discs!” </p> <p>That’s what Stephen Stills told the producers of <em>Carry On</em>, Rhino’s new box-set retrospective of his remarkable career. The label had originally envisioned a three-disc set, but Stills won his point and a fourth CD. Given the incredible range and scope of his career, there’s quite a bit of ground to cover. </p> <p><em>Carry On</em> takes us through his early days as an earnest young folkie and his paradigm-shifting tenures with Buffalo Springfield, Crosby, Stills, Nash (and occasionally Young) and Manassas. But it also provides evidence of his friendship and musical partnership with Jimi Hendrix and studio collaborations with everyone from Eric Clapton and Booker T. Jones to members of the Beatles and Rolling Stones. </p> <p>Even four discs barely capture the immensity of Stills’ talents as a multi-instrumentalist, songwriter, singer and producer. From Monterey to Woodstock to Altamont, he has a Zelig-esque knack for being present whenever rock history is in the making.</p> <p>“I had to fight to get four discs,” he says, “ ‘cause I don’t wanna do this again, let alone put my friends through it. Geez, I could have a whole box set of just blues. But at the same time, I wasn’t gonna release something where every time I farted in the studio it’s on there and it costs $400! We wanted something where you can have the four discs or you can get one of them.” </p> <p>They don’t make rock stars like Stills anymore. Earthy, well read, voluble on any number of subjects, from British history to psychoacoustics, he’s possessed of a ready wit and a gift for withering sarcasm. “I’m working on that,” he says somewhat apologetically of the latter trait. “Trying to get it in check. But sometimes I can’t help myself.”</p> <p>Even at age 67, Stills seems endowed with boundless energy. His well-chosen words come in torrents, much like the notes from his guitar. Remarkably versatile and insatiably curious about musical styles, he can tear off a heart-breaking country lick, a barn-razing rock solo or an elegantly incisive acoustic folk run. He can even negotiate a Latin groove far better than most white guys can. And his masterful guitar work has always been in service of a plaintively flinty singing voice that can embody the conscience of a generation or the pain of lost, lamented love. </p> <p>Nor is he content to rest on his laurels. Fresh from overseeing the production of his box set, Stills jumped right in the studio to cut a brand-new blues album with Kenny Wayne Shepherd. </p> <p>“Kenny Wayne and I are like brothers,” he says. “We figured out that we probably are related through a couple of white slavers and a Cherokee or two. I mean, my origins—according to my aunt, I’m basically a blue-eyed Injun’ from Louisiana. And after the Civil War, my great-great-grandmother gravitated to southern Illinois, where my father was from. But I’ve got relatives that look so much like ‘gator swamp guys. Duane Allman and I had the same kind of bond. All of us crackers—we’re all just a tribe.”</p> <p>Stills self-identifies as a southerner and can drop into a thick drawl when the occasion demands an “I’ll tell ya whut, boy…” But actually, he spent his childhood roaming around the Gulf of Mexico, on both sides of the U.S. border. This goes a long way toward explaining his unusually broad musical scope. The son of a military career man, Stills did some growing up in Louisiana, Florida, Costa Rica, Nicaragua, El Salvador and the Panama Canal Zone. He has vivid memories of seeing the Zulu Parade in a New Orleans Mardi Gras at the tender age of six. He began picking out tunes on a Stella acoustic guitar when he was around 13.</p> <p>“I was really a blues guy,” he says. “I loved Elmore James, Howlin’ Wolf, Muddy Waters and Guitar Slim. But I had an acoustic guitar. So who do you copy? You learn Travis picking and you learn Doc Watson, Lead Belly and stuff like that. Most of the folkies were writing poetry to the accompaniment of whatever chords they could muster. Hank Williams was the songwriter/guitar player among them.” </p> <p><em>Photo: Getty Images</em></p> <p><strong><em>For the rest of this story, plus features on Brad Paisley, Testament, Tommy Thayer, Children of Bodum, Steven Wilson and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=homepage&amp;utm_medium=website&amp;utm_campaign=RexExcerpt">check out the May 2013 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em> </strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202013-03-26%20at%2011.20.47%20AM.png" width="620" height="808" alt="Screen Shot 2013-03-26 at 11.20.47 AM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/folk-icon-stephen-stills-reflects-buffalo-springfield-csny-and-his-new-box-set-carry#comments Buffalo Springfield May 2013 Stephen Stills Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 16 Apr 2013 11:38:00 +0000 Alan di Perna 18078 at http://www.guitarworld.com All That Jazz: Learning Solos Played on Other Instruments to Expand Your Improvisational Approach http://www.guitarworld.com/all-jazz-learning-solos-played-other-instruments-expand-your-improvisational-approach <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the May 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=videospage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>A study technique that has proven invaluable to me over the years has been transcribing—figuring out, note for note—solos played on other instruments besides the guitar, which is something I still spend quite a lot of time doing. Early on, I would focus on solos by other guitar players, such as Wes Montgomery, Pat Martino, Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Winter, Jeff Beck and Buddy Guy. </p> <p>This is something I still do, but at a certain point in my development I began expanding my transcribing endeavors to include music played on other instruments, such as the saxophone, trumpet and piano. Doing this has provided me with lots of fresh ideas and approaches that I would then incorporate into my own soloing ideas and techniques. </p> <p>I like to emulate a vocal-like sound when I’m soloing, often using a stereo chorus or delay effect to attain that feel. I also strive to achieve that by employing a legato approach, using hammer-ons, pull-offs and string-bends, and using a light touch when alternate picking in an effort to retain some of that legato feel. </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243136628001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243136628001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/all-jazz-learning-solos-played-other-instruments-expand-your-improvisational-approach#comments All That Jazz May 2013 Mike Stern News Lessons Magazine Mon, 15 Apr 2013 11:33:28 +0000 Mike Stern 18089 at http://www.guitarworld.com String Theory: Using Upper-Structure Voice Leading to Create a Climactic, Jazzy Finale to Last Month's Arpeggio Etude http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-using-upper-structure-voice-leading-create-climactic-jazzy-finale-last-months-arpeggio-etude <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the May 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=videospage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>This month I’d like to offer a final, climactic eight-bar variation on the “Raking Leaves” arpeggio etude I presented last month. </p> <p>The techniques used are the same—sweep picking and fret-hand muting—and you’ll be happy to discover that the fretboard shapes are a little more compact and finger friendly than last month’s, due to the higher positions employed. In terms of theory and harmony, the arpeggios used herein feature some sophisticatedly cool, jazz-style voice-leading.</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243182660001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243182660001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243170326001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243170326001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --> http://www.guitarworld.com/string-theory-using-upper-structure-voice-leading-create-climactic-jazzy-finale-last-months-arpeggio-etude#comments Jimmy Brown May 2013 String Theory Videos Lessons Magazine Thu, 11 Apr 2013 12:36:56 +0000 Jimmy Brown 18086 at http://www.guitarworld.com Hole Notes: The Progressive, Acoustic Stylings of Virtuoso Picker Robert Fripp http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-progressive-acoustic-stylings-virtuoso-picker-robert-fripp <!--paging_filter--><p><em>The following content is related to the May 2013 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now, or in our <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-may-13-brad-paisley/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=videospage">online store</a>.</em></p> <p>While Robert Fripp is perhaps best known for his contributions to the pioneering progressive-rock ensemble King Crimson, the guitarist’s full discography shows participation in more than 700 albums (including collaborations with David Bowie, Peter Gabriel and Brian Eno). </p> <p>He’s also the founder of the League of Crafty Guitarists, is regarded as a pioneer of Frippertronics (a minimalist compositional approach using layered guitars, tape loops, repetitive arpeggiated textures and polyrhythms) and is the creator of what’s now termed “New Standard Tuning” (low to high, C G D A E G). In this lesson, we’ll focus primarily on the multifaceted guitarist’s acoustic work with King Crimson. </p> <p><iframe width="100%" height="450" scrolling="no" frameborder="no" src="https://w.soundcloud.com/player/?url=http%3A%2F%2Fapi.soundcloud.com%2Fplaylists%2F4322322%3Fsecret_token%3Ds-AMD34"></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/hole-notes-progressive-acoustic-stylings-virtuoso-picker-robert-fripp#comments Dale Turner Hole Notes May 2013 Robert Fripp Lessons Wed, 10 Apr 2013 13:26:38 +0000 Dale Turner 18094 at http://www.guitarworld.com