Kirk Hammett http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/297/all en This All-Ukulele Cover of Metallica's "One" Is Simply Incredible — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/all-ukulele-cover-metallicas-one-simply-incredible-video/25334 <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, check out an all-ukulele cover of Metallica's "One."</p> <p>It's performed by a guy who calls his project "Ukes of Hazzard," which is a pretty cool name, if you ask us.</p> <p>"This was by far the most difficult cover I've done," he says on YouTube. "It's long, it's intricate and devilishly fast at the end. The whole process of tabbing, learning, playing and finally editing this monstrosity took me the better part of two weeks. I'm pretty pleased with the final result. There're still a few bits I wish I'd played a little cleaner.</p> <p>"Full disclosure: I actually couldn't pull off a clean take of the main solo, no matter how hard I tried. By the time I realized this, I had already put a lot of work into the rest of the song, so I decided to record it at 80 percent and speed it back up in post, rather than shelve the song. A cheat, for sure, but the song sounds better for it. Plus I've heard that Kirk Hammett has done the same thing on a few Metallica albums, so I don't feel too bad."</p> <p>Note that Mr. "Ukes" is playing every part of the song—including bass, drums and the vocal melody—on a ukulele, and you can see him playing the various parts as the video progresses.</p> <p>To read what Hammett has to say about his <em>own</em> playing on "One," <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/100-greatest-guitar-solos-no-7-one-kirk-hammett">step right this way.</a></p> <p><strong>For more Ukes of Hazzard videos, <a href="https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC6s51JYNhp6p6MdMTITm6OA">head in this general direction.</a></strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/n8RBrw5pGWg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/all-ukulele-cover-metallicas-one-simply-incredible-video/25334#comments Kirk Hammett Metallica One Ukes of Hazzard Videos Blogs News Mon, 24 Aug 2015 14:53:38 +0000 Damian Fanelli 25334 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metallica's Kirk Hammett: How to Play Like Stevie Ray Vaughan — Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-how-play-stevie-ray-vaughan <!--paging_filter--><p>It’s definitely true that Stevie Ray Vaughan is one of my all-time favorite guitarists. </p> <p>Ironically, I was never really into Stevie while he was alive. </p> <p>Then, shortly after he died, I got hold of a video of him playing a live show and was just totally blown away by his timing, his tone, his feel, his vibrato, his phrasing—everything. Some people are just born to play guitar, and Stevie was definitely one of them. </p> <p>The VH1 <em>Behind the Music</em> program on Stevie showed some old footage of him playing guitar when he was a little kid—he was so good it made me want to cry.</p> <p>It’s difficult to emulate SRV’s tone because his hands and soul had so much to do with it. Having said that, in my opinion, if there’s a player whose sound you really admire, you might be able to emulate his tone by investigating the gear he used. </p> <p>For example, if you really want to get a sound similar to Stevie Ray’s, then buying a Les Paul and a high-gain Marshall stack definitely isn’t the way to go, because that’s not even close to what he used. </p> <p>However, you might get close if you buy a Strat—and probably even closer if you buy a vintage Strat [<em>Fender offers an SRV signature model Strat that’s based on his legendary “Number 1” guitar, which was a 1959 body with a 1962 Rosewood neck and a left-hand tremolo unit—GW Ed.</em>]. You’ll get even closer if you get a vintage Strat and a vintage Fender amp, because that’s what he used. I also know that Stevie used an old Ibanez Tube Screamer and a Vox Wah, too.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/kirksrv1.jpg" width="620" height="148" /></p> <p>Another real big factor in Stevie’s killer tone was the gauge of his strings and how hard he used to play. A lot of people try to do the SRV thing using a set of .009s, and you just can’t do what he did with slinky strings like that. Stevie used real heavy strings—.013 (high E) to .058 or even .060 (low E). So, to get even close you need to start with at least a set of .011s.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/kirksrv2.jpg" width="620" height="148" /></p> <p>In addition to using heavy strings, you also really need to attack the guitar if you want to get that big, percussive sound Stevie had. He was a super-aggressive player, and he didn’t really pick from his wrist—he picked with his entire arm! </p> <p>If you watch video footage of him, you’ll see exactly what I mean. Stevie also used a lot of downstrokes and a lot of that “string raking” thing too (more about this technique in a moment), which really added to the unique rhythm and lead sound that he got. Of the newer blues players out there, Kenny Wayne Shepherd definitely has that heavy string, high action, percussive attack thing happening—and he does it really well, in my opinion.</p> <p>Like all great players, Stevie’s style contained a bunch of cool nuances—some of which are really hard to nail. Take the intro riff to “Scuttle Buttin’ ” [Couldn’t Stand the Weather] for example. I’ve been messing around with it for years but I still can’t play it with Stevie’s feel. There’s a weird slide he does near the beginning that I just can’t get exactly right, no matter how hard I try. I can play the riff note-for-note, but there’s that little nuance that I just can’t get, and I’ve been chasing it for a long time.</p> <p><strong>String Raking</strong></p> <p>As I just mentioned, SRV often used a technique called string raking, which is a relatively easy way to spice up your lead playing. As you’re about to discover, it’s kind of like percussive sweep picking. <Strong>FIGURE 1</strong> shows a simple C minor blues lick that starts with a string rake. </p> <p>To play this, mute the A, D and G strings by lightly resting your left-hand index finger across them, then quickly rake your pick across them using a single, smooth downstroke that ends with the half-step bend at the 10th fret on the B string. Adding this simple move to the lick definitely adds extra emotion, attitude and emphasis to the lick—try playing it without the rake and you’ll hear what I mean.</p> <p><strong>Quarter-tone Bends</strong></p> <p>Another SRV move that definitely adds both bite and a nice bluesy tension to a solo is to bend certain notes just a tad so they end up sitting right between two notes. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is an A minor run that features this technique. As you can see, the second-to-last note you play, the C note at the 5th fret on the G string, is bent up a quarter step so that it sits right between C and C#. </p> <p>Great blues players do this kind of thing all the time, and Stevie was especially good at it—hell, he’d even add a quarter note bend to notes he’d already bent up by one or even two steps. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a Stevie Ray style, bluesy, E minor lick that utilizes both of the techniques we’ve just discussed—string raking and quarter-tone bends.</p> <p><strong>Vibrato</strong></p> <p>Being able to shake a note in a way that compliments both the song and the mood of the solo is a highly expressive art that Stevie Ray Vaughan definitely perfected. I especially love his vibrato because it is so damned wide and muscular. </p> <p>Unfortunately, this technique is almost as difficult to describe as it is to do. So, to learn more about this, I recommend that you listen closely to his albums and also watch videos of him in action, zoning in on what he does with his left hand. Check out SRV’s <em>Live at the El Mocambo</em> video (below)—it’s a jaw-dropping experience and, if you watch closely, you’ll learn a lot.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/PP0vzZk8Olg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-how-play-stevie-ray-vaughan#comments Big Four Kirk Hammett Metallica Sound and Fury Stevie Ray Vaughan Blogs News Lessons Magazine Mon, 06 Jul 2015 20:26:19 +0000 Kirk Hammett 10968 at http://www.guitarworld.com Kirk Hammett and Michael Schenker Jam Behind the Scenes on 'That Metal Show' — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-and-michael-schenker-jam-behind-scenes-metal-show-video <!--paging_filter--><p>The April 18 episode of <em>That Metal Show</em> featured the first-ever Kirk Hammett-Michael Schenker jam session.</p> <p>Below, you can watch the pair rehearsing on the set right before taping started.</p> <p>Things kicked off with “chord progression that would be good for us to jam on,” which the Metallica guitarist showed the UFO/Michael Schenker Group guitarist. And then they were off.</p> <p>“In the 14 seasons of <em>That Metal Show</em>,” Trunk said afterwards. “I don’t know if I’ve ever had a moment like that, because Kirk Hammett and Michael Schenker just warmed up on the set before we taped he episode. I was jokingly saying this may be as proud [an] accomplishment as [the] day my kids were born to have been able to orchestrate this to happen on the show.” </p> <p>Trunk added that he and Hammett originally bonded over their love of UFO, and that Hammett was willing to to fly across the country to finally play with Schenker, whom he had met on a few occasions.</p> <p>Hammett's appreciation for Schenker is no secret. When <em>Guitar World</em> asked him to select the record that changed his life, he chose UFO's <em>Force It</em> (1975). </p> <p> "When it got to the guitar solo, I was just blown away by Michael Schenker's tone, phrasing and technique," he said. "By the time the second solo came on with the fastest descending lick I'd ever heard, I was totally hooked! I immediately grabbed the album cover and saw the picture of Schenker playing a Flying V." </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/uj1e8Ll1pBI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-and-michael-schenker-jam-behind-scenes-metal-show-video#comments Kirk Hammett Metallica Michael Schenker That Metal Show Videos News Mon, 20 Apr 2015 16:26:55 +0000 Damian Fanelli 24330 at http://www.guitarworld.com Kirk Von Hammett's Second Annual Fear FestEvil Coming to San Jose in April http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-von-hammetts-second-annual-fear-festevil-coming-san-jose-april <!--paging_filter--><p>Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett has announced the details of the next Kirk Von Hammett Fear FestEvil.</p> <p>The annual event, now in its second year, will include a murder-mystery dinner/VIP party at the Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, California, April 10, followed by a two-night Fear FestEvil musical punch at RockBar Theater April 11 and 12.</p> <p>On the 10th, guests attending the Fear FestEvil VIP party will enjoy a night of "whodunnit" mystery madness, dining alongside Hammett, touring the eerie and atmospheric mansion and trying to figure out who killed whom. Guests can expect twists, turns and clues from some "horror royalty" as they try to crack the mystery.</p> <p>On the 11th and 12th, Fear FestEvil friends heading to the RockBar Theater can expect to see some of the finest pieces in any modern horror collection as Kirk Von Hammett unveils more of The Crypt publicly, before throwing down some heavy music courtesy of Meshuggah, High On Fire, Orchid, Blues Pills, Agnostic Front and Asada Messiah. Sirius Radio's Liquid Metal host Jose Mangin and 107.7 the Bone's Nikki Blakk will preside over the proceedings.</p> <p>"It has always been my intention that Fear FestEvil events carry both the weird and the loud," Hammett says, "and what better way to achieve another extension of what we want to do than eat dinner in a haunted house while solving criminal acts before a weekend of super kick-ass music?!"</p> <p>Kirk Von Hammett's Fear FestEvil kicked off last year in San Francisco at the Regency Ballroom. The inaugural event featured highlights of Hammett's famous Crypt Collection, an array of panels and guest speakers, live musical performances and various on-site vendors. </p> <p>For tickets and details, visit <a href="http://www.fearfestevil.com/">FearFestEvil.com.</a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-01-09%20at%201.21.08%20PM.png" width="620" height="600" alt="Screen shot 2015-01-09 at 1.21.08 PM.png" /></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-von-hammetts-second-annual-fear-festevil-coming-san-jose-april#comments Kirk Hammett News Fri, 09 Jan 2015 18:31:01 +0000 Guitar World Staff 23252 at http://www.guitarworld.com Kirk Hammett Lesson: How to Play Metallica's "Master of Puppets" http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-lesson-how-play-metallicas-master-puppets <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's one fresh from the <em>Guitar World</em> video archives! </p> <p>It's a clip that appeared on the disc that accompanied our January 2006 issue, which features Metallica's Kirk Hammett on the cover.</p> <p>In the first part of the video, Hammett shows you how to play Metallica's classic "Master of Puppets." After that, Metallica buddy Zach Harmon invites the <em>Guitar World</em> cameras to take an exclusive tour of Metallica HQ, gear and all. Enjoy!</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3815669424001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3815669424001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-lesson-how-play-metallicas-master-puppets#comments January 2006 Kirk Hammett Metallica Videos News Lessons Magazine Wed, 01 Oct 2014 16:45:09 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22479 at http://www.guitarworld.com Exodus Premiere New Song, “Salt the Wound,” Featuring Metallica’s Kirk Hammett http://www.guitarworld.com/exodus-premiere-new-song-salt-wound-featuring-metallica-s-kirk-hammett <!--paging_filter--><p>Thrash pioneers Exodus will release their 10th album, <em>Blood In, Blood Out,</em> October 14 through Nuclear Blast. </p> <p>It will be the band's first album with vocalist Steve "Zetro" Souza since 2004's <em>Tempo of the Damned.</em> </p> <p>In anticipation, the group has premiered a song off the album, "Salt the Wound," which happens to feature a guitar solo by Kirk Hammett of Metallica. Check out the track below and let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe src="//www.youtube.com/embed/CMs9yNlBp4c" height="365" width="620" allowfullscreen="" frameborder="0"></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/exodus">Exodus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/exodus-premiere-new-song-salt-wound-featuring-metallica-s-kirk-hammett#comments Exodus Kirk Hammett News Tue, 09 Sep 2014 16:25:33 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22326 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metallica's Kirk Hammett and Randall Take Their Association to the Next Level with KH103 Hammett Signature Head http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-and-randall-take-their-association-next-level-kh103-hammett-signature-head <!--paging_filter--><p>Kirk Hammett has had a long relationship with Randall, which in recent years has resulted in a successful run of signature offerings, including the KH120RHS head and KH412 cab, KH75 combo, KH15 practice amp and KH3 preamp module. </p> <p>But Hammett and Randall are about to take their partnership up a notch with the soon-to-be-released KH103 amplifier. </p> <p>“I was using the modular amps, but I realized I needed something extra durable to take out on the road,” Hammett says. “The KH103 is what I was looking for. It’s point to point and hand soldered and made so well. It has these amazing gain stages, which really make the amp sound above and beyond.”</p> <p>The KH103 is born out of three years of meticulous prototyping with famed amp designer Mike Fortin. The 120-watt three-channel all-tube amp has been road tested and refined through some serious gigs, including the Big Four Yankee Stadium concert, as well as tours through Abu Dhabi, India and Metallica’s 30th anniversary shows in 2011 at the Fillmore in San Francisco.</p> <p>“When Mike first came over with this new amp design, I plugged it in and fell in love,” Hammett says. “It instantly became a part of my sound. That amp is basically the sound you hear in the movie Through the Never [Metallica’s 2013 IMAX concert film]. It’s a part of my touring sound and will be a part of my recording sound in the future. It’s a great-sounding amp. It’s given me the tone I’ve been chasing for a long time.”</p> <p>The new Randall KH103 will debut this fall with a retail price point of $3,749.99.</p> <p><strong>Randall KH103 Specs </strong></p> <p>• 120 watt, three-channel all-tube (nine 12AX7 and four 6L6) amplifier.<br /> • <Strong>CONTROLS</strong> Three gain and volume with three-way bright switch for each, plus presence, depth, and dual switchable master volumes.<br /> • <strong>LOOPS</strong> Dual switchable series/parallel<br /> • <strong>MIDI/SWITCHING</strong> Seven MIDI-assignable functions for each channel as follows: channel select, boost, low/medium/high gain voicing, master volume 1/2 select, loop/loop2 select, store. Individual metering and bias controls. Footswitch not included (RF8 or RF4 suggested).<br /> • <strong>CONSTRUCTION</strong> Heavy-duty metal front/rear grilles, corners, edging. Dual side handles for easy lifting. </p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-and-randall-take-their-association-next-level-kh103-hammett-signature-head#comments August 2014 Kirk Hammett Metallica Randall Amps News Gear Wed, 13 Aug 2014 20:05:42 +0000 Brad Angle 22117 at http://www.guitarworld.com Prime Cuts: Metallica's James Hetfield and Kirk Hammett Critique Key Songs in the Band’s Harsh, Noble History http://www.guitarworld.com/prime-cuts-metallicas-james-hetfield-and-kirk-hammett-critique-key-songs-band-s-harsh-noble-history <!--paging_filter--><p><em>Another gem from the </em>Guitar World<em> archive</em> ...</p> <p>Metallica’s 1983 debut, the explosive <em>Kill ’Em All</em>, taught a grateful world a lesson in unbridled thrashing fury. Since then, their sound has passed through numerous stages, but the guttural intensity that was the hallmark of the young Metallica remains the essence of the band today.</p> <p>Over the past 25 years, Hammett and James Hetfield have established themselves as metal’s quintessential guitar alliance. In the following retrospective, Kirk and James take a walk down Metallica memory lane and critique some of the key songs in the band’s harsh, noble history.</p> <p><strong>“Seek and Destroy," <em>Kill ’Em All</em> (1983)</strong></p> <p>JAMES HETFIELD: The idea for “Seek” came from a Diamond Head song called “Dead Reckoning.” I used to work in a sticker factory in L.A., and I wrote that riff in my truck outside work. This was our first experience in a real studio. I used a white Flying V, which was the only guitar I had back then. I still have the guitar in storage. The song is based around a one-note riff that was up a little higher. Though most of my riffs are in E, that one worked off an A.</p> <p>KIRK HAMMETT: When I was doing that guitar solo, I was using James’ Marshall. That was the Marshall—it had been hot-rodded by some L.A. guy, the same guy who hot-rodded Eddie Van Halen’s Marshalls—and when it came time to do my guitar leads, I just plugged into that. I had maybe four or five days to do all my leads. I remember thinking, There’s 10 or 12 songs on this album, so that means two a day. I had to throw down a solo, not think much about it, and move on.</p> <p>I had my trusty old Ibanez Tubescreamer, my trusty wah pedal and my black Gibson Flying V that I used on the first four albums. It was either a ’74 or a ’78, I’m not sure. I didn’t have much really worked out; I knew how I wanted to open the initial part of the solo after the break, so I just went for it two or three times. </p> <p>And then the producer said, ‘That’s fine! We’ll use it!’ There were no frills, no contemplation, no overintellectualizing—we weren’t going over the finer points. On a couple of notes in that solo, I bend the notes out of pitch. For 18 years, every time I’ve heard that guitar solo, those sour notes come back to haunt me! [<em>laughs</em>] I remember on that tour, whenever it came time to do that guitar solo, I was always like, Okay, I’m gonna play this so much better than the way I recorded it!</p> <p>I had been taking lessons from Joe Satriani for, like, six months prior to joining the band, so his influence was pretty heavy in my mind and in my playing. He passed down so much information to me, I was still processing a lot of it. When it came time to do the solo, I was thinking, I hope Joe likes this. I hope this isn’t something he’ll just pick apart, like he has in the past.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/J-tvJcTPxHc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"The Four Horsemen," <em>Kill ’Em All</em> (1983)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: Dave [<em>Mustaine, Metallica’s original guitarist</em>] brought that song over from one of his other bands. Back then it was called “The Mechanix.” After he left Metallica, we kind of fixed the song up. The lyrics he used were pretty silly.</p> <p>HAMMETT: Prior to recording that song, we put in a slow middle section that wasn’t there when I first joined the band, and it needed a slow, melodic solo. I remember going through the song with everyone, and when I got to that part, I played something really melodic. Lars looked up at me and said, “Yeah, yeah!” He’s a big lead guitar fan. One of his biggest influences is Ritchie Blackmore. For that song I put down one lead, then added one on a different track. </p> <p>I wasn’t sure which one to use. I listened to both tracks at once, to see if one would stand out. But playing both tracks simultaneously sounded great, and we decided to keep it like that on the record. Some of the notes harmonized with each other, and I remember Cliff [<em>Burton, bassist</em>] going, “Wow, that’s stylin’—it sounds like Tony Iommi!”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/C4nCy5CITc8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <hr /> </p><p><strong>"Creeping Death," <em>Ride the Lightning</em> (1984)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: We demoed “Ride the Lightning” and one other song in the studio before we recorded the album, so there’s actually a demo somewhere of those three songs with different lyrics. When we did the crunchy “Die by my hand” breakdown part in the middle, I sat in the control room after we did all the gang vocals, and everyone was just going nuts! That was our first real big, chanting, gang-vocal thing. There was almost some production value to it. That whole album was a big step for us. By then I had the Gibson Explorer. I grew to love that shape better than the V.</p> <p>HAMMETT: When we first began playing that song in the garage, I noticed that the lead guitar part also incorporated the chorus. I thought that was a good opportunity to play something a bit wild and dynamic. The first figure in that song pretty much came off the top of my head. I was still using the black Flying V and the Boss distortion pedal through Marshall amps, with a TC Electronics EQ. For that song, Flemming [<em>Rasmussen, engineer</em>] suggested that I double-track the solo, which made it sound a bit thicker and fuller. We did that solo, after which we had to do this small fill at the end, a four-bar break with four accents afterwards. The plan was to fill the break up and play something over the four accents. When I studied with Joe Satriani, I did this chordal exercise, a diminished chord with four notes. I just played that over these four accents, and it worked out real nice.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/lXWq3f01e2U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"Fade to Black," <em>Ride the Lightning</em> (1984)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: That song was a big step for us. It was pretty much our first ballad, so it was challenging and we knew it would freak people out. Bands like Exodus and Slayer don’t do ballads, but they’ve stuck themselves in that position which is something we never wanted to do; limiting yourself to please your audience is bullshit.</p> <p>Recording that song, I learned how frustrating acoustic guitar can be. You could hear every squeak, so I had to be careful. I wrote the song at a friend’s house in New Jersey. I was pretty depressed at the time because our gear had just been stolen, and we had been thrown out of our manager’s house for breaking shit and drinking his liquor cabinet dry. It’s a suicide song, and we got a lot of flack for it, [<em>as if</em>] kids were killing themselves because of the song. But we also got hundreds and hundreds of letters from kids telling us how they related to the song and that it made them feel better.</p> <p>HAMMETT: I was still using the black Flying V, but on “Fade to Black” I used the neck pickup on my guitar to get that warm sound. I played through a wah-wah pedal all the way in the “up” position. We doubled the first solo, but it was harder to double the second solo in the middle because it was slow and there was a lot of space in it. Later I realized that I harmonized it in a weird way—in minor thirds, major thirds and fifths. For the extended solo at the end, I wasn’t sure what to play. We had been in Denmark for five or six months, and I was getting really homesick. We were also having problems with our management. Since it was a somber song, and we were all bummed out anyway, I thought of very depressing things while I did the solo, and it really helped. I played some arpeggios over the G-A-B progression, but we didn’t double track that solo. When that was finished, I went back and did the clean guitar parts behind the verse. James played an arpeggiated figure while I arpeggiated three-note chords. We ended up getting a very Dire Straits–type sound.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/WEQnzs8wl6E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <hr /> </p><p><strong>"The Call of Ktulu," <em>Ride the Lightning</em> (1984)</strong></p> <p>HAMMETT: Again, we were using Marshalls; I tracked the whole album with Marshall amps and my Gibson Flying V. For that song, I knew that I wanted to come up with something really melodic at the beginning of the solo. At that point in the song, there’s just a lot of riffing, a lot of heavy dynamics. I was thinking, Wouldn’t it be nice if we had something somewhat melodic to lead into it? Hence that little melody I played. I can remember thinking, Fuckin’ hell, man, these guys want me to play an awful-long fucking guitar solo! It was our first instrumental, and it was an incredibly long guitar solo. </p> <p>It was, like, ‘How can I keep this solo going without making it sound like I’m just playing a bunch of notes?’ So I thought that I would break it up into sections rather than play one long spew of notes. I used a modal approach, and there are also arpeggios that I play in the solo. They’re actually ‘broken arpeggios,’ a term that I got from Yngwie Malmsteen. At that time, 1984, Yngwie was big in the guitar world; he influenced me in that he was using all these different scales and different arpeggios, and really got me thinking about that kind of sound. I was also thinking chromatically: there’s that one part at the top of the next cycle where I play a chromatic lick that goes all the way down the high E string with the wah pedal.</p> <p>I actually wrote out the entire solo on pieces of paper, using my own notes and my own pet names for the individual licks. I would say that 80 percent of it was composed beforehand and 20 percent of it was improvised. When we revisited that song with the symphony on <em>S&amp;M</em>, it was a lot of fun. It felt like I was visiting my guitar technique from, like, 15 years ago or something. I just don’t play like that now—I’m a lot bluesier—so it was pretty trippy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/t1RTgznup5c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"Welcome Home (Sanitarium)," <em>Master of Puppets</em> (1986)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: The idea for that song came from the movie <em>One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest</em>. “Fade to Black” worked well, and we wanted to have another slow, clean, picking type of song, this time with a chorus. I had trouble singing that chorus. It’s really high, and when I went to sing it in the studio, I remember Flemming looking at me like, “You’re kidding.” I said “Shit, I don’t know if I can do this!” So I ended up singing it lower than I intended, but we put a higher harmony on it and it worked pretty well. The riff for that song was lifted from some other band, who shall remain anonymous.</p> <p>HAMMETT: The beginning of the first solo is an arpeggiated ninth chord figure, where I basically mirror what James is playing. The second guitar figure had some harmonies. I used a wah-wah pedal on the third solo, which was pretty straight ahead. The fourth solo comes out of harmonized guitars; the very last lick was based on something really cool I saw Cliff play on guitar in the hotel one night that I knew would work in that spot.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/V6Dfo4zDduI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <hr /> </p><p><strong>"Master of Puppets," <br /> <em>Master of Puppets</em> (1986)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: I think we wanted to write another song like “Creeping Death,” with open chords carried by the vocals and a real catchy chorus. On Master of Puppets we started getting into the longer, more orchestrated songs. It was more of a challenge to write a long song that didn’t seem long. The riff for that song was pretty messy—constantly moving. It works good live. People love to scream “Master!” a couple of times.</p> <p>HAMMETT: I used my Jackson Randy Rhoads V for this solo. When you listen to the solo, there’s this weird sound right after the mellow part where it sounds like I’m hitting a superhigh note in the midst of my phrasing, like I’m fretting the string against the pickup. Well, what happened was, I had accidentally pulled the string off the fretboard! You know how you take an E string, you pull it down toward the floor away from the neck? I accidentally pulled down on the string, and it fretted out on the side of the fretboard. We heard it back, and I was like, ‘That’s brilliant! We’ve gotta keep that!’ Of course, I’ve never been able to reproduce that since; it was like a magic moment that was captured on tape. That was one of my most favorite things about that guitar solo. I thought I had screwed the solo up by accidentally pulling on the string, but once I heard it back, I thought it sounded great. That was definitely a keeper!</p> <p>For the next solo we used backward guitar parts. To get them I played a bunch of guitar parts that were in the same key as the song and laid them down on quarter-inch tape. Then we flipped the tape over and edited it, so we had two or three minutes of backward guitar. We put it in the last verse of the song.</p> <p>A lot of people think I actually came into my own sound on that song. That had everything to do with buying Mesa/Boogie Mark II-C heads. Boogie made those heads for a short time in the mid Eighties and only made a limited amount of them. They moved on after that, and they haven’t really been able to recapture that sound since—I don’t know if they ever tried or not. But there’s something about Boogie Mark II-C heads that were really unique and very individual in their gain stages and overall sound. Most of Master of Puppets was tracked with Boogie heads and Marshall heads combined, and I used my Gibson Flying V and my Jackson. By that time, I also had my black Fernandes Stratocaster.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/xnKhsTXoKCI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong><em>The $5.98 EP/Garage Days Re-Revisited</em> (1987)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: Putting out an EP of all cover tunes was absolutely unheard of, which we thought was really cool. We didn’t do too many arrangements, except to some of the Budgie tunes, where we eliminated some lame singing parts. For some of the songs we tuned down to D to make them a little heavier. The guitar sound is really awful, but it was the first thing we put out where the bass could be heard, so Jason [<em>Newsted, bassist</em>] was happy</p> <p>HAMMETT: That was recorded when I first started using ESP guitars with EMG pickups. All the lead guitar parts on that EP flowed really quickly. I did them in two nights. All of the leads were mine. The fact that the original versions of “Helpless” and “The Wait” don’t even have solos in them was a bit of luck—no one would have anything to compare them to, and it kept any preconceived ideas out of my head. We did that EP for the fans, just for fun, and Elektra loved it and released it.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/mVjnpaMscfQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <hr /> </p><p><strong>"…And Justice for All," <em>…And Justice for All</em> (1988)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: That song is pretty long, like all the songs on that album. We wanted to write shorter material, but it never happened. We were into packing songs with riffs. The whole riff is very percussive; it goes right along with the drums. The singing on that song is a lot lower than usual.</p> <p>HAMMETT: I worked out an opening lick for the solo but it wasn’t really happening, so I plugged in the wah-wah pedal, which I always do when all else fails. As soon as I plugged in, we were done. A lot of people give me shit about how I hide behind the wah pedal, but something about it brings out a lot of aggression. It just tailors the sound to match the mood and emotion I’m trying to convey. It’s purely an aesthetic thing and not a crutch or anything like that. The riff where I utilize the open string hammer-ons developed from a Gary Moore lick that I’d been studying. I figured it would sound really good combined with the heavy E-chord progression</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/CQ4GbcuBvUQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"One," <em>…And Justice for All</em> (1988)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: I had been fiddling around with that A-G modulation for a long time. The idea for the opening came from a Venom song called “Buried Alive.” The kick drum machine-gun part near the end wasn’t written with the war lyrics in mind, it just came out that way. We started that album with Mike Clink as producer. He didn’t work out too well, so we got Flemming to come over and save our asses.</p> <p>HAMMETT: I lost a lot of sleep over that set of guitar solos! [<em>laughs</em>] The main guitar solo at the end, with the right-hand, Eddie Van Halen–type tapping came almost immediately. That guitar solo was just a breeze; what was going on with the rhythm section in that part of the song was just very, very exciting for me to solo over. The first solo was a little bit more worked out. </p> <p>I heard James playing some really melodic stuff over the intro, just doodling around, and I thought, That’s pretty cool, I’m gonna use part of that. So I have to give credit to James for subliminally pushing me in that melodic direction. I think the first two licks at the top of the first solo are his, and the rest of the solo just sort of fell into place. That little chord comp thing in that first solo came from a major-chord exercise that I do all the time. I thought it would sound really good in the solo if I just staccato-picked it and resolved it right there. I thought the solo needed something to perk people’s ears up!</p> <p>The middle guitar solo in that song, I must have recorded and rerecorded it about 15 million times. I wanted a middle ground between the really melodic solo at the beginning and the fiery solo at the end. I wanted that to sit very confidently within the song, but it sounded very unconfident, and I was never happy with it.</p> <p>Finally, it came down to the wire: we were mixing the album while simultaneously touring on the <em>Monsters of Rock</em> tour. One night, I flew from Philadelphia to New York City, and while everyone else was on their way to Washington, D.C., I went to the Hit Factory and rerecorded the solo again. I brought my guitar, I had one of my main amps sent to the studio, and I redid the solo there and finally nailed it. I was very, very happy about that! The next day, we played a show in Washington, D.C. It got panned by the critics, because we’d all only had about three hours of sleep and were exhausted. </p> <p>But I got a good solo the night before, so it was worth it!</p> <p>We wanted a clean guitar sound for “One.” I think at that point I was using the ESP neck-through-body KH-1 guitar, with the skulls on the fingerboard. I’d gotten that guitar in ’88 and used it pretty prominently in the studio. I used an ADA preamp and an ADA MP-1—it was a programmable digital amp that had tubes in it, with a separate rack-mounted Aphex parametric EQ. I remember blending that thing with the Boogies for lead sounds and clean sounds. The clean sound on ‘One’ was done almost exclusively with the ADA MP-1.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/WM8bTdBs-cw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <hr /> </p><p><strong>"Enter Sandman," <em>Metallica</em> (1991)</strong></p> <p>HAMMETT: Again, I was playing my ESP with a wah pedal, and this time I used a bunch of different amps. We were combining Boogies and modified Marshalls; I also think we had a clean old Fender in there, and maybe even an old Vox amp, and they were all blended together to get that tone. I can remember getting that lead guitar sound together very quickly, very spontaneously. When it came time to start thinking about that guitar solo, I just thought, Well, this is a great guitar song, and it’s in the spirit of all my favorite guitar bands, like Thin Lizzy and UFO, but kind of modernized. So I kept thinking, Michael Schenker, Michael Schenker… But then I started thinking, If Brian Robertson from Thin Lizzy played on this song, what would he play? With that mindset, I started playing what I thought Brian Robertson would play on a song like that, and the entire fucking guitar solo wrote itself!</p> <p>You know how the guitar solo plays out, and then there’s a lead guitar break that leads into a breakdown? I think the time has come to tell where I actually got that lick. It’s from ‘Magic Man’ by Heart, but I didn’t get it from Heart’s version; I got it from a cut off Ice-T’s <em>Power</em> album, where he used it as a sample. I was listening to <em>Power</em> a lot while we were recording <em>Metallica</em>, so I kept on hearing that lick. I thought, I have to snake this! I did change it around a little bit, though.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/MPJKuygePHk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"Don’t Tread on Me," <em>Metallica</em> (1991)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: A lot of the songs on this album are more simple and concentrated. They tell the same story as our other shit but don’t take as long. There aren’t a hundred riffs to latch on to—just two or three stock, really good riffs in each song.</p> <p>I used my ESPs and tons of other guitars: a 12-string electric, a Telecaster, a Gretsch White Falcon, a sitar and other things. I also used a B-Bender, a bar installed in the guitar that twists the B string up a full step. It’s used a lot in country music. But “Don’t Tread” is just real heavy guitar—there’s really nothing else to it.</p> <p>HAMMETT: I used a Bradshaw [<em>preamp</em>] because the mids were clean and the low end sounded real percussive, and I put it through a VHT power amp. The harmonic distortion also sounded nice and dirty. For the highs we used two Marshalls. We combined all the sounds and put it all through Marshall cabinets with 30-watt speakers and blended all the room mikes. My sound is a lot thicker and punchier than before, and I think it’s better than ever. For the majority of the leads on this album I used a third ESP guitar. I also used my 1989 black Gibson Les Paul Custom. For the clean sound, I used a ’61 stock white Strat and a Fender blackface Deluxe. I also used a ’53 Gibson ES-295 style, and an ESP Les Paul Junior with EMG pickups.</p> <p>I used the ’89 black Gibson Les Paul Custom and a wah-wah pedal on “Don’t Tread on Me.” At one point I had to play these ascending lead fills, and it just wasn’t happening at all. So I wound up playing harmonics instead of lead guitar fills, and it worked really well.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Db1s-eV-Bd0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <hr /> </p><p><strong>"The God That Failed," <em>Metallica</em> (1991)</strong></p> <p>HETFIELD: That’s a very nice song. Slow, heavy and ugly. There are a lot of single-note riffs and more open-chord shit on this album. A lot of the rhythms I came up with were a little too complicated—half-step changes and other weirdo shit that Kirk had trouble soloing over. So we simplified some things. All the harmony guitar stuff on this album is incorporated in the rhythm tracks. I played rhythm all the way through, then I overdubbed harmony guitar things. There are harmony solos and harmony guitar in the rhythms, but they’re very distinct from each other. We found that layering a guitar six times doesn’t make it heavy.</p> <p>HAMMETT: I had this whole thing worked out, but it didn’t fit because the lead was too bluesy for the song, which is characterized by real heavy riffing and chording. So producer Bob Rock and I worked out a melody, to which I suggested that we add a harmony part, but Bob said it would only pretty it up. So we ended up playing the melody an octave higher, and it sounded great. We basically mapped out the whole solo, picking the best parts from about 15 solos I’d worked out. It’s one of my favorite solos on the album.</p> <p>One thing I did on this album that I hadn’t done before was play guitar fills. I filled up holes—like when James stops during the vocal, I put in a little stab or, as Bob calls it, a “sting.” My solos on this album are a little offbeat. Though a lot of guitar players start the solo on the downbeat—the first beat of the measure—I come in on the upbeat of the third measure of a bar, like on “Enter Sandman” and “Don’t Tread on Me.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="350" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/HIgb7cMgJEw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"Hero of the Day," <em>Load</em> (1996)</strong></p> <p>HAMMETT: The first time James heard my solo on "Hero of the Day," he didn’t like it. He said, "It sounds like bad Brian Robertson!" [<em>laughs</em>] I was, like, "What do you mean?" And then, after much "debating" back and forth, we kind of agreed that it wasn’t so much the solo that was the problem but the lack of anything going on underneath it. So he went and put something down underneath it that made it sound, well, a little better to his ears, I guess. It was one of those things where one musician hears one thing one way and another musician hears it completely different.</p> <p>For the <em>Load</em> album, I was experimenting so much with tone that I had to keep journals on what equipment I was using. For "Hero of the Day," I know I used a 1958 Les Paul Standard with a Matchless Chieftain, some Boogie amps and a Vox amp—again, they’re all blended. I was listening to a lot of David Bowie at the time, particularly the sounds on <em>Low</em>, and I was really interested in playing guitar parts to see if I could shape the character of the song by playing parts instead of solos. And to a certain degree that’s what I was trying to do during "Hero of the Day." It’s a guitar solo in the classic sense, but it’s a part of the song as well. I was very into the idea of creating soundscapes and crafting textures. I was tired of playing ripping, shredding solos; I wasn’t into proving myself like I was around, say,<em> …And Justice for All</em>. It’s great to be able to have that in your back pocket and use it when necessary. But for the most part, taste, tone and atmosphere are my main concerns.</p> <p>I’ll tell you a funny story, though. In ’94, a guy came up to me and said, "How come you stopped doing double stops? You used to play a lot of double stops, and then you stopped doing it. I miss it." And when we were recording <em>Load</em>, all of a sudden I remembered him saying that. I thought, Yeah, you know, he’s right! So in that song "Better Than You," which ended up on <em>ReLoad</em>, I just crammed both solos with all sorts of double stops. And that was totally for that guy.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/olzz82oRCMI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <hr /> </p><p><strong>"Fuel," <em>ReLoad</em> (1997)</strong></p> <p>HAMMETT: That track was actually recorded at the same time we were doing all the <em>Load</em> stuff. It was one of the first tracks [<em>from that session</em>] that I actually played a guitar solo on. That guitar solo was played through a couple of old Marshalls, some Vox amps and the Chieftain, and I used a 1963 Sea Foam Green Strat. I can remember thinking, God, this guitar has such a killer sound to it! It wasn’t like all my other guitars, which had active humbuckers and everything. It sounded fat, present and full, and I was blown away by how big it sounded, even though I was going through single-coil pickups, stuff that wasn’t active. That was a real treat for me, because it really felt like I was going in a new direction, tone-wise and equipment-wise. And that all kind of blossomed throughout <em>Load</em> and <em>ReLoad</em>. Bob Rock definitely had a big role in that, because he’s a total equipmenthead, and he really got me thinking about vintage gear.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/PvF9PAxe5Ng" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>"No Leaf Clover," <em>S&amp;M</em> (1999)</strong></p> <p>HAMMETT: That song came together only about a week before we actually played with the symphony. And that week leading up to the actual dates was so hectic. We had to do so much footwork that I really didn’t have as much time as I would have liked to spend on that solo. So I thought, Hell, I’ll just go for it and improvise! And what you hear on that track is just me improvising, and playing off the top of my head on my ESP ‘Mummy’ guitar. I mainly used my live rig, which consists of Boogies and Marshalls and Boogie cabinets. My rack-mounted wah is in there, and that’s about it, other than maybe just a touch of delay.</p> <p>There’s a modulation toward the end of the solo, and I kind of wanted to outline that modulation a little bit. That’s why I shift keys for the four or eight bars at the end. The solo on "No Leaf Clover" is actually comped from the best licks from both nights and made into one solo. In retrospect, I would have loved to have had more time to structure it and put it together. But we were on a deadline, blah blah blah, and we really didn’t want to rerecord anything—we wanted it to all be recorded with the symphony. So we just kind of went for it.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XP1XJiBvE_c" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/prime-cuts-metallicas-james-hetfield-and-kirk-hammett-critique-key-songs-band-s-harsh-noble-history#comments GW Archive James Hetfield Kirk Hammett Metallica Prime Cuts Interviews News Features Magazine Mon, 04 Aug 2014 15:18:39 +0000 Guitar World Staff 1889 at http://www.guitarworld.com Kirk Hammett, Exodus, Death Angel Members Perform Judas Priest's "Grinder" and Metallica's "Seek & Destroy" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-exodus-and-death-angel-members-perform-judas-priests-grinder-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Below, check out some fan-filmed footage of Metallica's Kirk Hammett performing Judas Priest's "Grinder" and Metallica's "Seek &amp; Destroy" with Exodus and Mark Osegueda of Death Angel. Note that Metallica bassist Robert Trujillo joins the band for "Seek &amp; Destroy." </p> <p>The jam session took place last Friday, July 25, at Hammett's "Fear FestEvil After Party" at the San Diego Comic-Con International. </p> <p>As we have reported 17,000 times, Hammett was a member of Exodus' original lineup before replacing Dave Mustaine in Metallica in 1983. </p> <p>As always, be sure to let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook! We admit the videos are on the dark side, the sound is actually pretty decent.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/vVJQNWGfOgs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/tw-JwSQ7cCA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/exodus">Exodus</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/judas-priest">Judas Priest</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallica-exodus-and-death-angel-members-perform-judas-priests-grinder-video#comments Exodus Judas Priest Kirk Hammett Metallica Videos News Fri, 01 Aug 2014 13:12:57 +0000 Guitar World Staff 22012 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metallica's Kirk Hammett Talks Recording "Super Heavy" Riff for Next Exodus Album http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-recording-super-heavy-riff-next-exodus-album <!--paging_filter--><p>Tonight, Metallica's Kirk Hammett will jam with his pre-Metallica band, Exodus, at his "Fear FestEvil After Party" at the San Diego Comic-Con International.</p> <p>However, it turns out Hammett has gone one step further in terms of reconnecting with his old band.</p> <p>"I play a guitar solo on the new Exodus album," Hammett told <a href="http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/metallicas-kirk-hammett-on-recording-with-exodus-it-was-huge-20140725">Rolling Stone</a>.</p> <p>"It felt really casual, really cool — just like it did back in 1980 when we were all just hanging out back in the day," Hammett said. "Me, recording a solo on their album was a huge thing for me. Other than the Exodus demo that's been heard by a lot of people, it's the only time I ever recorded with Exodus. It was a huge thing for me."</p> <p>The song, "Salt in the Wound," will appear on an album that features Steve Souza, Exodus' vocalist from the late Eighties and early Nineties. Hammett calls it a "super heavy" riff. </p> <p>"I play a pretty cool solo, and then Gary [Holt] comes in and plays another solo, and you know what? I listened to that I thought, 'Wow, it's 1982 all over again and here we are, Gary and I are trying to cut each other's heads off with our guitar solos.' Nothing has changed much in the last 30 years. I love it. I love those guys."</p> <p>As for tonight's event in San Diego, Hammett added:</p> <p>"We're going to be playing 10 or 12 cover songs, but Rob [Trujillo] and I are adamant about not playing the usual cover songs that everyone else plays, like 'Communication Breakdown.' People are going to be expecting a bunch of heavy-metal cover songs. There's going to be some of that, but Rob and I, we like to stretch out a little bit so we'll be playing some different stuff, too. We're gonna be playing 'The Real Me' by the Who, which is a song both Rob and I love. And we're going to get funky and play [Kool and the Gang's] 'Jungle Boogie.'"</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/exodus">Exodus</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-recording-super-heavy-riff-next-exodus-album#comments Exodus Kirk Hammett News Fri, 25 Jul 2014 16:33:30 +0000 Guitar World Staff 21942 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metallica's Kirk Hammett to Debut Zombie Action Figure at Comic-Con in San Diego http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-debut-zombie-action-figure-comic-con-san-diego <!--paging_filter--><p>Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett's love for horror films is well known. Now Hammett's company, Kirk von Hammett Toys, has announced a zombie action figure molded in his likeness. </p> <p>The figure will be released at the San Diego Comic-Con later this month. Only 300 of the toys are being produced as an exclusive item, in support of the Nuclear Blast USA record label. </p> <p>The figure goes on sale 1 to 2 p.m. July 25 and 2 to 3 p.m. July 26 at the Nuclear Blast USA booth at San Diego's Comic-Con. Hammett will be on hand to autograph each toy sold. </p> <p>For info about Comic-Con, <a href="http://www.comic-con.org/cci">head in this general direction.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-debut-zombie-action-figure-comic-con-san-diego#comments Comic-Con Kirk Hammett Metallica zombies News Tue, 22 Jul 2014 21:40:51 +0000 Guitar World Staff 21818 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metallica's Kirk Hammett Talks 'Ride the Lightning,' Cliff Burton and Benefits of Taking Guitar Lessons from Joe Satriani http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-ride-lightning-cliff-burton-and-benefits-taking-guitar-lessons-joe-satriani <!--paging_filter--><p><em>This is an excerpt from the August 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this story, plus features on the Who's </em>Quradophenia<em>, Soundgarden, Jackson Guitars, David Crosby, our Summer Tour Survival Guide, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Jackson, Ibanez, Blackstar, Musicvox, EarthQuaker Devices, Electra Guitars and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-2014-kirk-hammett/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MetallicaExceprt">check out the August 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><strong>High Voltage: On the 30th anniversary of Ride the Lightning, Kirk Hammett talks about the making of Metallica’s electrifying album that changed metal and put a jolt in the band’s career.</strong></p> <p>Tucked in a nondescript industrial tract north of San Francisco near San Pablo Bay, Metallica’s headquarters is an oasis for both thrash fanatics and gear heads of every stripe. The massive studio—dubbed HQ by the band—has been Metallica’s base of operations for writing, rehearsals, demoing and all-purpose hanging since late 2001. In a rare case of reality trumping fantasy, it is a place that exceeds expectations. </p> <p>We’ve been invited to HQ to talk with Kirk Hammett about the 30th anniversary of Metallica’s classic sophomore album, <em>Ride the Lightning</em>. Released on July 27, 1984, the album showcased their growing musical maturity and willingness to take chances. </p> <p>With brazen disregard for convention, Metallica delivered the pure thrash attack for which they were known while simultaneously branching into progressive, melodic and, ultimately, more marketable territory. <em>Ride the Lightning</em> didn’t just change the band’s trajectory—it reset the course of metal itself. </p> <p><em>Below is an excerpt from our interview with Hammett. For the complete conversation, plus info about Randall Amps' KH103 Hammett Signature Head, pick up the all-new August 2014 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>, which is available now on newsstands and <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-2014-kirk-hammett/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MetallicaExceprt">at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><strong>Today, <em>Ride the Lightning</em> ranks as a classic album in the metal genre. Looking back through the lens of the past 30 years, how has your view of the <em>Ride the Lightning</em> era changed?</strong></p> <p>It’s interesting. Just this morning I was telling my kids what I was going to do today. I’m like, “These people are taking a picture of me in an electric chair!” They’re both young, so of course they said, “Why?” I explained it’s because we have a song called “Ride the Lightning” and that’s another way of saying, “You’re getting electrocuted in an electric chair!” Then I had to play them the song and sing them the lyrics. They’re sitting there looking at me, like, Wow. [laughs] </p> <p>So I’m sitting with them, listening to that “Ride the Lightning” guitar solo, and I was like, I have absolutely no recollection of putting all those harmonies on there! [laughs] When we were putting that song together, we had the intro riff, the verse, the chorus, and a part of the instrumental bridge. When the whole thing slows down and there’s that solo section, I remember I pretty much played that solo as it is off the bat.</p> <p>When I recorded that in 1984, I was 21 years old. That’s crazy. In 1984, a guitar solo like that was something. If you put it into context of what was going on back then, it was very modern sounding. Of course, if you put it into today’s context, it sounds like classic rock. [laughs] It’s not like today’s norm, with sweeping arpeggios and 32nd notes everywhere. I also have to say that when I listened to it this morning, I realized that the actual sound of the album is still good. After all these fucking years, it still holds up sonically.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/SOMD8MmBT8A" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Did you guys do a lot of writing in Denmark? Or did you have most of the tracks finalized before you arrived?</strong></p> <p>I remember “Fight Fire with Fire” and “Fade to Black” were finished in the basement of a friend’s house in Old Bridge, New Jersey. I think it was this guy called Metal Joe [Chimienti]. Before we went to Europe to tour and eventually record in Denmark, we stopped on the East Coast to play some shows. We knew we needed to finish some of these songs. </p> <p>We had most of “Fade to Black,” except the end part were the solo happens, and I came up with that there. I remember we were writing “Trapped Under Ice” there too. We were using that fast Exodus riff, and James came up with the chorus and I added that whole middle instrumental part. <em>Ride the Lightning</em> was written in a few places: the house in El Cerrito, New Jersey, Copenhagen, and down in L.A. before James and Lars moved up to San Francisco.</p> <p><strong>Were you writing the stuff in El Cerrito around the same time you were taking lessons from Joe Satriani?</strong></p> <p>Yeah, absolutely.</p> <p><strong>Do you remember any specific techniques that he showed you that ended up on <em>Ride the Lightning</em>?</strong></p> <p>All the stuff I learned from Joe impacted my playing a lot on <em>Ride the Lightning</em>. He taught me stuff like figuring out what scale was most appropriate for what chord progressions. We were doing all sorts of crazy things, like modes, three-octave major and minor scales, three-octave modes, major, minor and diminished arpeggios, and tons of exercises. </p> <p>He taught me how to pick the notes I wanted for guitar solos as opposed to just going for a scale that covered it all. He taught me how to hone in on certain sounds and when to go major or minor. He also helped me map out that whole chromatic-arpeggio thing and taught me the importance of positioning and minimizing finger movement. That was a really important lesson. </p> <p><strong>You guys made a pretty serious jump in songwriting and style between <em>Kill ’Em All</em> and <em>Ride the Lightning</em>. Lars has said that Cliff Burton was an important force in pushing Metallica in this new progressive direction. What was your experience like working with Cliff during this time?</strong></p> <p>Cliff was a total anomaly. To this day, I’m still trying to figure out everything I experienced with him. He was a bass player and played like a bassist. But, fucking hell, a lot of guitar sounds came out of it. He wrote a lot of guitar-centric runs. He always carried around a small acoustic guitar that was down tuned. </p> <p>I remember one time I picked it up and was like, “What is this thing even tuned to, like C?” He explained that he liked it like that because he could really bend the strings. He would always come up with harmonies on that acoustic guitar. I would be sitting there playing my guitar and he’d pick up his bass and immediately start playing a harmony part. And he would also sing harmonies. I remember the Eagles would come on the radio and he would sing all the harmony parts, never the root. </p> <p><em>Photo: Jimmy Hubbard</em></p> <p><em>For the rest of this story, plus features on the Who's </em>Quradophenia<em>, Soundgarden, Jackson Guitars, David Crosby, our Summer Tour Survival Guide, columns, tabs and reviews of new gear from Jackson, Ibanez, Blackstar, Musicvox, EarthQuaker Devices, Electra Guitars and more, <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-august-2014-kirk-hammett/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=MetallicaExceprt">check out the August 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-06-18%20at%209.59.57%20AM_0.png" width="620" height="806" alt="Screen Shot 2014-06-18 at 9.59.57 AM_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-ride-lightning-cliff-burton-and-benefits-taking-guitar-lessons-joe-satriani#comments August 2014 Kirk Hammett Metallica Videos Interviews News Features Magazine Thu, 19 Jun 2014 15:14:31 +0000 Brad Angle 21607 at http://www.guitarworld.com Metallica's Kirk Hammett Premieres "Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two)" Music Video http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-premieres-daisy-bell-bicycle-built-two-music-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Metallica guitarist Kirk Hammett is among the artists who have contributed recordings to Mark Ryden's new concept album, <em>The Gay Nineties: Olde Tyme Music</em>. </p> <p>Every artist who contributed to the project — including Nick Cave, Katy Perry and Weird Al — recorded his or her own interpretation of the 1892 song "Daisy Bell (Bicycle Built for Two)." You can watch it below. You can check out Hammett's instrumental version of the song below.</p> <p>The album is part of Ryden's art exhibition, "The Gay Nineties West," which opened at Kohn Gallery in Los Angeles May 3. All profits from this record are being donated to Little Kids Rock, a nonprofit that revitalizes music education in disadvantaged schools.</p> <p>Note that Ryden created the video.</p> <p>For more information, visit <a href="http://www.littlekidsrock.org/">littlekidsrock.org</a> and <a href="http://www.markryden.com/">markryden.com</a>.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/kfYzXcCvBN4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-kirk-hammett-premieres-daisy-bell-bicycle-built-two-music-video#comments Kirk Hammett Videos News Mon, 19 May 2014 12:42:14 +0000 Damian Fanelli 21280 at http://www.guitarworld.com Kirk Hammett: Metallica to "Buckle Down" on Completing New Record in September http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-metallica-buckle-down-completing-new-record-september <!--paging_filter--><p>Metallica fans were given a welcome surprise when the band debuted their new <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/listen-metallica-release-garage-demo-version-new-song-lords-summer">"Lords of Summer" demo </a>in March.</p> <p>But it seems the metal masses will have to wait a bit longer for the release of their new full-length, which will be the follow-up to 2008's <em>Death Magnetic</em>.</p> <p>"We totally want to make an album," says lead guitarist Kirk Hammett. "But we have all these other touring commitments, and we have families now. It’s gonna be summertime soon, and it’s hard to work because the kids are out of school."</p> <p>"But we have a backlog of riffs in the riff bank," he continues. "Now it’s about picking riffs out, putting them together and moving along. Later, we’ll revisit it all and see where it goes. We’ve all said to each other that September is gonna be the time when we buckle down. I know I told everyone it was gonna be last January…but that’s just the way it goes! [laughs]"</p> <p>While the band has stated that the "Lords of Summer" demo is representative of Metallica's current <a href="http://www.rollingstone.com/music/news/metallica-talk-epic-new-song-the-lords-of-summer-20140317" target="_blank"> "creative headspace,"</a> Hammett points out that even that track is still being refined.</p> <p>"Because of everything we had going on, I didn’t have time to work out the guitar solo in 'Lords of Summer'," says Hammett. "The solo that’s on the demo track was all we had time to do. I barely knew what I was gonna do and didn’t have time to really formulate anything. We told everyone that the song was a demo version…and the solo is <em>really</em> a demo version. [laughs] If you compare the solo in the demo version to what I’ve been playing live at those South American shows, it’s a lot better and more refined now."</p> <p>Below, you can listen to the "Lords of Summer" Garage Demo and compare the solo to the updated version contained in their live performance of the new track:</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/AiOtev3rEKI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Y8u6Ww1ZGeU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Photo by Jimmy Hubbard</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/kirk-hammett-metallica-buckle-down-completing-new-record-september#comments Kirk Hammett Metallica Videos News Features Fri, 09 May 2014 14:59:21 +0000 Brad Angle 21211 at http://www.guitarworld.com Video: Metallica's Kirk Hammett Talks Gear and More with Dunlop TV http://www.guitarworld.com/video-metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-gear-and-more-dunlop-tv <!--paging_filter--><p>Here's a clip published earlier this month by Dunlop TV, also known as <a href="http://www.youtube.com/user/jimdunlopusa?feature=watch">Jim Dunlop's official YouTube page.</a></p> <p>Metallica's Kirk Hammett invited Dunlop TV host Bryan Kehoe into Metallica's HQ at this year's Kirk Von Hammett Fear FestEvil Horror Convention to discuss his horror memorabilia collection — and the convention itself. </p> <p>In the clip, Hammett and Kehoe — who have apparently known each other for quite a while — talk about "the good ol' days," musical inspiration, gear and more.</p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/COBxqY8vziA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/metallica">Metallica</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-metallicas-kirk-hammett-talks-gear-and-more-dunlop-tv#comments Jim Dunlop Kirk Hammett Metallica Videos News Mon, 24 Feb 2014 16:10:47 +0000 Damian Fanelli 20559 at http://www.guitarworld.com