Slash http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/267/all en Artist Captures James Hetfield, Joe Satriani, Slash and Others Shredding Without Guitars http://www.guitarworld.com/artist-captures-james-hetfield-joe-satriani-slash-others-shredding-without-their-guitars/25138 <!--paging_filter--><p>Brooklyn-based artist Fred Stesney has created a set of portraits of some of rock's most legendary six-string artists...without their guitars. </p> <p>You've probably seen the images Stesney modeled these drawings after, but you definitely haven't seen them like this. </p> <p>Says Stesney: </p> <p>"Guitar players can get away with making some funny faces and postures, but when you take away the six-stringed excuse, they look pretty silly."</p> <p><strong>Check out Stesney's drawings in the gallery below! And check out his other work at <a href="https://www.behance.net/fredstesney/">behance.net.</a></strong></p> <p><em>Remember to click on the "magnifying glass" symbol to take a closer look at each photo!</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/artist-captures-james-hetfield-joe-satriani-slash-others-shredding-without-their-guitars/25138#comments Angus Young Fred Stesney James Hetfield Joe Satriani Slash Galleries News Thu, 30 Jul 2015 20:34:49 +0000 Guitar World Staff 25138 at http://www.guitarworld.com 100 Greatest Guitar Solos: No. 37 — Guns N' Roses' "Sweet Child O' Mine" (Slash) http://www.guitarworld.com/100_greatest_guitar_solos_37_quotsweet_child_o039_minequot_slash <!--paging_filter--><p>“When ‘Sweet Child O’ Mine’ was written, it was a joke as far as I was concerned,” Slash says. </p> <p>“I was just fuckin’ around when I came up with that riff. To me it was a nightmare because, for some strange reason, everyone picked up on it and, the next thing you knew, it had turned into a song. I hated it forever! </p> <p>"The guitar solo itself is a one-take, spontaneous kind of thing. Having played the song at rehearsals enough times, when it came to recording it I knew exactly where the melody was and it came real easy.”</p> <p>Below, check out a few essential versions of "Sweet Child O' Mine" by different artists throughout the decades, including Guns N' Roses!</p> <p><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/article/100_greatest_guitar_solos_36_quotblack_starquot_yngwie_mamsteen">Next: 36) "Black Star"</a></p> <p><strong>Guns N' Roses, Official Music Video:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/1w7OgIMMRc4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Guns N' Roses, Live at the Ritz, 1988:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JcIM_PL8BAA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Luca Stricagnoli, Acoustic Arrangement for Two Guitars:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ok5d8nXAngw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><em>Guitar World's</em> Jimmy Brown, Acoustic/Capo Arrangement:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/aifPVXZZaCI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Michelle Kwan, Playing a Traditional Chinese Guzheng:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/YO6sFdoklVU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>7-Year-Old Guitarist Zoe Thomson (We don't know for sure if she's a "sweet child."):</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/X4Kjtp4sA9E" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Slash with Myles Kennedy, Live in 2010:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/JXaXnRbDMUc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Slash with Myles Kennedy, Live—Acoustic—in 2010:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bRfc_Y_AsLo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/guns-n039-roses">Guns N&#039; Roses</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/100_greatest_guitar_solos_37_quotsweet_child_o039_minequot_slash#comments 100 Greatest Guitar Solos 100 Greatest Guitar Solos Guns N' Roses GW Archive Jimmy Brown Luca Stricagnoli Slash Videos Features Thu, 23 Jul 2015 14:42:30 +0000 Guitar World Staff 1657 at http://www.guitarworld.com Slash Shows You How to Play Guns N' Roses' "Paradise City" — Video Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/video-lesson-slash-shows-you-how-play-guns-n-roses-paradise-city <!--paging_filter--><p>Around the release of his eponymous debut solo album, Slash took the time out to show us how to play some of his favorite riffs, both new and old. </p> <p>In the <em>Guitar World</em> video below, Slash talks about writing the classic Guns N' Roses tune "Paradise City." He also shows you how to play the key parts of the <em>Appetite for Destruction</em> track.</p> <p>Slash's latest studio album—<em>World on Fire</em>—was counted among <em>Guitar World's</em> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-worlds-50-best-albums-2014">50 Best Albums of 2014.</a> </p> <p>Enjoy!</p> <p><em>Photo: Robert John</em></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/nEq1tKM4v2k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/guns-n039-roses">Guns N&#039; Roses</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-lesson-slash-shows-you-how-play-guns-n-roses-paradise-city#comments Guns N' Roses May 2010 Slash Videos News Lessons Magazine Thu, 23 Jul 2015 14:10:48 +0000 Guitar World Staff 15012 at http://www.guitarworld.com Stevie Ray Vaughan, Steve Vai, Yngwie Malmsteen, Slash and More Play "The Star-Spangled Banner" — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eight-solo-guitar-versions-star-spangled-banner <!--paging_filter--><p>Happy Independence Day, everyone!</p> <p>In honor of this week's holiday, I originally—and simply—wanted to share a grainy, vintage video of my all-time favorite guitarist, Stevie Ray Vaughan, performing "The Star-Spangled Banner" in ancient times. </p> <p>But then I noticed Steve Vai's particularly awesome version of the song ... and Yngwie Malmsteen's recent version ... and Eric Johnson's version—and then I found versions by Slash and Dave Mustaine ... and, of course, there's the granddaddy of them all, Jimi Hendrix at Woodstock.</p> <p>So I figured the more, the merrier! I could've kept on going (There's always Cliff Burton's version, and a commenter mentioned Neal Schon), but I think eight versions of the same song gets the point across, and this represents a nice mix of styles. </p> <p>Feel free to complain, compare and contrast! Enjoy your holiday! </p> <p><strong>TED NUGENT</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/NepNJO2nwU0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>STEVE VAI</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tyCRSZjtYBI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>YNGWIE MALMSTEEN</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/anWu1WUwnSk" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>SLASH</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hKco_PvmUHw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>DAVE MUSTAINE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/D8GHCpjlpwY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>ERIC JOHNSON</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/rCKCbdLxBoQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>STEVIE RAY VAUGHAN</strong> </p> <p>Note: This video needs to be edited!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/UnyvPZSvLW8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>JIMI HENDRIX</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sjzZh6-h9fM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><em>Damian Fanelli is the online managing editor at Guitar World.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ted-nugent">Ted Nugent</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eric-johnson">Eric Johnson</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-eight-solo-guitar-versions-star-spangled-banner#comments Damian Fanelli Dave Mustaine Eric Johnson Jimi Hendrix Slash Steve Vai Stevie Ray Vaughan Ted Nugent Zakk Wylde Blogs News Thu, 02 Jul 2015 16:33:38 +0000 Damian Fanelli 11505 at http://www.guitarworld.com Thirty Veteran Guitarists — Including Slash, Steve Vai and John Petrucci — Pick the Song They'd Most Want to Be Remembered By, Part 2 http://www.guitarworld.com/30-veteran-guitarists-slash-steve-vai-and-john-petrucci-choose-song-theyd-want-be-remembered-part-2 <!--paging_filter--><p><em>From the GW Archive: This feature originally appeared in the May 2002 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. The story has a "time capsule" theme: We asked several veteran guitarists to choose the one song they'd most want to be remembered by after many years. Here we are, 13 years later (Does that qualify as "many"?), opening the time capsule to examine its contents! Enjoy!</em> </p> <p>A few decades ago, NASA sent a probe called <em>Voyager</em> straight out of the solar system. Its mission: to make contact with alien intelligence. </p> <p>The capsule was crammed with artifacts—including greetings in more than 50 languages—intended to convey information about Earth's cultures. But just in case those items failed to communicate across language barriers, NASA also included a recording of Chuck Berry performing his rock and roll masterpiece "Johnny B. Goode." </p> <p>For a while after <em>Voyager's</em> launch, the joke around the agency was that a reply had been received from an alien civilization: "Forget the scientific shit," went the message. "Send more rock and roll!" But what songs should be sent? We at <em>Guitar World</em> decided the logical place to start would be the musicians themselves. </p> <p>In a project that started almost five years ago (hence the inclusion of George Harrison in <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/thirty-guitar-legends-including-eddie-van-halen-dimebag-darrell-and-jeff-beck-choose-song-theyd-most-want-be-remembered-part-1">Part 1</a>), we began asking many of the most influential guitarists in rock, blues and metal one deceptively simple question: "If you had to put one of your songs in a time capsule to be opened sometime in the future, which would you choose, and why?" </p> <p><strong>Check out Part 2 of the story below.</strong><br /> <em><a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/thirty-guitar-legends-including-eddie-van-halen-dimebag-darrell-and-jeff-beck-choose-song-theyd-most-want-be-remembered-part-1">Part 1, featuring Eddie Van Halen, Jeff Beck, George Harrison, Dimebag Darrell, Joe Satriani, Kirk Hammett, John Paul Jones and more, is available here.</a></em></p> <p><strong>Dave Mustaine (Megadeth),<br /> "Holy Wars...The Punishment Due"<br /> </strong> <em>Rust in Peace (1990)</em></p> <p>“Because we will never cease trying to dominate one another.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/dlR4XtnmjPc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Steve Vai,<br /> "Love Secrets"</strong><br /> <em>Passion and Warfare (1990)</em></p> <p>"If it's going to be aliens that will discover this piece of music thousands of years from now, I'd pick 'Love Secrets.' The song is an unbridled ride though my imagination. It was void of any contemporary parameters when I wrote it, because the approach I took to composing it was rather unorthodox. </p> <p>"The harmonic structure is very rich; it's a thought-out piece of music, and it's not just a bunch of noise. Somehow, it's very arranged but it's still completely chaotic. </p> <p>"I had a profound dream experience when I was 15 or 16, and the song is the audio reality of that very bizarre and lucid dream stat. After researching this phenomenon, I realized that I was not alone in experiencing incredibly dynamic, rich music in a dream. It was like witnessing a thousand-piece orchestra. </p> <p>"The experience was very intense-it wasn't like I was listening to it with my ears; I was hearing the music with 'inner ears.' The music was <em>raging</em>, and I can't even express what I was experiencing visually. </p> <p>"I tried to reproduce this music, and even though my attempt was a complete failure at best, I still think it's one of the best pieces of music I've ever written. I really think it represents the pinnacle of my ability to combine my spiritual quest in life with my absurd technical inclinations."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/rZHjOOAsxtY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Slash (Guns N' Roses),<br /> "Paradise City"</strong><br /> <em>Appetite for Destruction (1987)</em></p> <p>"This is the song that's most indicative of what I'm really into as a musician. One of the things I enjoy about being a guitar player is striving to reach some kind of a goal, even when I'm not sure what that is. </p> <p>And 'Paradise City' was the closest I got to doing what I would consider great, loud, fuckin' riff rock that clocks in at just three minutes. That's where I was headed, and that was the closest I got to realizing my goal in terms of expressing myself on the guitar in GN'R."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/zahNMZ1hp9Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Buddy Guy,<br /> "Damn Right, I've Got the Blues"</strong><br /> <em>Damn Right, I've Got the Blues (1991)</em></p> <p>I am especially proud of the lyrics and I really feel them every time I sing this song. If you don’t understand what it’s about, just keep living and you’re going to find out. People think money will make them happy, but if you’re rich you got to worry about keeping it and if you’re poor you got to worry about getting it. That’s why ‘Damn Right, I’ve Got the Blues’ is a story that speaks to everyone.</p> <p>“It’s like my pal Bo Diddley said: ‘Even Donald Trump’s got the blues,’ because he has to keep all those women away from his money. Or take Bill Gates: the guy invents ways to make money and every month they try to take him to court for something else. </p> <p>"Someone’s always after him, and that is what they call the blues. It comes to you in all forms and fashions. When I was a kid plowing with a mule, I thought that if I just had $5,000 I’d never have to plow again. I didn’t know you can’t ever get away from it. Damn right.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/LGpEMPUYUCU?list=PL7507484206994FF7" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Zakk Wylde (Ozzy Osbourne),<br /> "No More Tears"</strong><br /> <em>No More Tears (1991)</em></p> <p>"People seem to like this little ditty. Why? It's a cool tune; I guess the solo's alright, and the guitar tone sounds pretty cool. People ask how I got that low, growling sound at the end of the verses. </p> <p>"It was just a 50-watt amp and a Les Paul with EMG pickups. And I went straight in, didn't run it through anything. When they mixed it, I think they put some SPX90 effect on it. It was in drop-D tuning, and we were at the A=440 pitch. It wasn't like I dropped down to some really low tuning."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/CprfjfN5PRs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>John Petrucci (Dream Theater),<br /> "Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence"</strong><br /> <em>Six Degrees of Inner Turbulence (2002)</em></p> <p>"I'm very lucky because i can get away with choosing an entire CD—this 42-minute composition is the title song of our new album. </p> <p>"It's an easy choice because it is the best possible representation of both my playing and the band's sound, running the gamut of every facet of our music. And because I co-wrote and co-produced it, I am, of course, particularly attached to it." </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/bIsQyhfS-YI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Jerry Cantrell (Alice In Chains),<br /> "Rain When I Die"</strong><br /> <em>Dirt (1992)</em></p> <p>"This is a song that makes me feel kind of 'purged' when I play it. I think a lot of our material is like a trip trough a dark place and out the other side. </p> <p>"This is a song about a relationship between a man and a woman.You have that rolling, really dark, heavy snaky riff, and the lyrical content is dark. Yet it's very uplifting in the chorus. For me, the chorus is the resolution, coming out of the darkness."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/eYhB8U6paBM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Gary Rossington (Lynyrd Skynyrd),<br /> "Simple Man"</strong><br /> <em>Pronounced 'Lĕh-'nérd 'Skin-'nérd (1973)</em></p> <p>“ ‘Simple Man’ says a lot, philosophically. I really think I am a simple man, and that’s the best way to be. Just be yourself and believe in God and find a good woman and don’t worry about getting rich and all that. </p> <p>"That’ll come along with the simple things. I went through the drugs and alcohol and that crap, and I quit it all. I wish it hadn’t taken so long, because it ruins a lot of stuff. It’s a dead-end road, and once you get to the end, you gotta turn around and go all the way back. </p> <p>"But when it’s all over, it’s great and you really do get grounded and realize it’s about making music—so enjoy the process.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/sHQ_aTjXObs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Kerry King (Slayer),<br /> "Payback"</strong><br /> <em>God Hates Us All (2001)</em></p> <p>“On this record I tried to write more directly about feelings that people have every day, so they don’t have to wonder what I’m talking about and how it relates to them. I think fans are going to hear a song like ‘Payback’ and say, ‘Man, that was me the other day!’ </p> <p>"‘Payback’ was written because everybody at some point in their lives has been wronged, pissed off or cut down by somebody—it’s a feeling everybody knows. </p> <p>"I wanted to pick some dark subjects that would be appropriate on a Slayer record and make them more personal and see if this stuff means more to the fans than some of the stuff on our earlier records.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/oRkidxfz0PY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Dickey Betts (The Allman Brothers Band),<br /> "In Memory of Elizabeth Reed"</strong><br /> <em>Idlewild South (1970)</em></p> <p>“It’s an awfully strong piece of music in that it allows all of the other players to have something they can really participate in. </p> <p>"It offers a lot of room for players to express themselves, and all of the musicians that have played in the Allman Brothers over the years have loved to play that song. It’s true for me too; we all really enjoy the improvisation that the song allows.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/NRu9nFdIXQc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Andy Summers (The Police),<br /> "Message In A Bottle"</strong><br /> <em>Regggatta De Blanc (1979)</em></p> <p>“I think, as a pop song, ‘Message’ has perfect form, with just enough alternation between tension and release to maintain the listener’s interest. Plus, the strong forward motion of the guitar riff maintains excitement all the way through the song. </p> <p>"The lyrics are among Sting’s best—the graphic image of a man alone on an island, the message in a bottle as a metaphor for loneliness, and the surreal image of a hundred billion bottles washed up on the shore to indicate how much loneliness is out there. It also has what I consider Stewart [Copeland]’s finest drum track. </p> <p>"When we recorded it, we learned how to keep the energy of the music up by doing a take and keeping the tape going while we rolled right into another take. For a while we opened our shows with ‘Message,’ and it always made us feel great and totally blew the audience away. To me, the sound of this song is the Police.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Xhwq0iPLSSc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Peter Frampton,<br /> "Do You Feel Like We Do"</strong><br /> <em>Frampton Comes Alive (1976)</em></p> <p>“It started as a song about a hangover. I woke up with a wineglass by the bed and then went to rehearsal with a hangover. </p> <p>"I started playing these chords I’d come up with on the acoustic the night before—D-F-C-G-D—which became the chorus. I added this riff we’d been jamming on in rehearsal, and it all came together. The guys in the band said, ‘C’mon, Pete, write some words—it’s almost there.’ </p> <p>"I said I couldn’t, that I had this really bad hangover. They said, ‘Well, sing about that.’ So I started with, ‘Woke up this morning with a wineglass in my hand.’ Nowadays that’s as far as I get before the audience takes over and sings the whole thing. </p> <p>"When I emphasize the second ‘you’ in the chorus, ‘Do you—you…’ everybody’s arm is in the air, pointing. I didn’t know it when I wrote it, but when I start involving the audience, then the personal suddenly becomes universal. And then it’s not my song anymore—it’s everybody’s.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/y7rFYbMhcG8" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Scott Ian (Anthrax),<br /> "Only"</strong><br /> <em>Sound of White Noise (1983)</em></p> <p>“Because [Metallica’s] James Hetfield told me it was a perfect song.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Us_IxW5LcvY?list=PLBC21440B4095BBEF" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Kenny Wayne Shepherd,<br /> "While We Cry"</strong><br /> <em>Ledbetter Heights (1995)</em></p> <p>“I was going to say ‘Blue on Black,’ but I went with this one instead, partly because it’s an instrumental. Years from now words, language, may be totally different, but people will still be able to understand the emotion in an instrumental like ‘Why We Cry.’ </p> <p>"I mean, we still feel what Mozart and Bach’s music was about 300 years later. </p> <p>"When the guitar is the only voice in an instrumental or a solo, I can get into a state where the music just flows out of me. And when it’s time to wind down, it almost takes me down with it.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/6YF4XlfoXCI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Jimmie Vaughan,<br /> "Planet Bongo"</strong><br /> <em>Do You Get The Blues? (2001)</em></p> <p>“ ‘Planet Bongo’ sums up everything that’s influenced me in music in a single song. </p> <p>"It’s me looking at exactly where I’m from through a pair of blues-tinted sunglasses. It’s all American; you could pick the song apart and find blues, jazz and gospel elements but nothing that’s not uniquely of this country. It’s not going to change the world, but it will help make it a little bit of a more fun place to be.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pCDh8UFCphA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Johnny Winter,<br /> "Be Careful With a Fool"</strong><br /> <em>Johnny Winter (1969)</em></p> <p>“I don’t really know why I’d pick this song, but I think it has a lot of soul and a lot of that good blues feeling. I also think it represents my sound and my style of guitar playing well. I learned it from B.B. King’s original version, which I love.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/R-J60ItbBU0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>Stone Gossard (Pearl Jam),<br /> "Nothingman"</strong><br /> <em>Vitalogy (1994)</em></p> <p>"The way this song came together, the way it sounds, the simplicity of it and the intention behind how it came about are all connected. It was a period of time when everybody in the band was a little frustrated. </p> <p>"All of us had been writing, and I knew Jeff [<em>Ament, Bass</em>] was in the studio with this song he had been working on. </p> <p>"So I dropped by to see if I could add some stuff—and within 20 minutes we had that song worked out. With that song, everybody in the band really took some steps toward each other, and something beautiful came out of it."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Chr2Hg5qNl4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/john-petrucci">John Petrucci</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/johnny-winter">Johnny Winter</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/dave-mustaine">Dave Mustaine</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/peter-frampton">Peter Frampton</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/lynyrd-skynyrd">Lynyrd Skynyrd</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/30-veteran-guitarists-slash-steve-vai-and-john-petrucci-choose-song-theyd-want-be-remembered-part-2#comments GW Archive John Petrucci Johnny Winter May 2002 Peter Frampton Slash Steve Vai Zakk Wylde Interviews News Features Magazine Fri, 26 Jun 2015 12:20:59 +0000 Guitar World Staff 19772 at http://www.guitarworld.com Watch Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators' Entire Hellfest Set — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/watch-slash-featuring-myles-kennedy-and-conspirators-entire-hellfest-set-video <!--paging_filter--><p>This summer, Slash has been busy touring the world with his trusty backing band, Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators. </p> <p>If you haven't been able to catch them live, this full, professionally shot video of the group's entire, hard-rocking set at Hellfest in Clisson, France, might be just what you need for a Monday. </p> <p>The band played:</p> <p>01. "You're a Lie"<br /> 02. "Nightrain "<br /> 03. "Avalon"<br /> 04. "Back from Cali"<br /> 05. "You Could Be Mine"<br /> 06. "The Dissident"<br /> 07. "World on Fire"<br /> 08. "Anastasia"<br /> 09. "Sweet Child O' Mine"<br /> 10. "Slither"<br /> 11. "Paradise City"</p> <p>Check it out below, and let us know what you think in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/Ounl7j3VJnM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/watch-slash-featuring-myles-kennedy-and-conspirators-entire-hellfest-set-video#comments Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators Slash Videos News Mon, 22 Jun 2015 15:37:25 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24786 at http://www.guitarworld.com The Top 10 Guitar Tandems of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-guitar-tandems-all-time <!--paging_filter--><p>Traditionally, the rock guitar hero is a lone gunslinger who swaggers onstage, commandeers the spotlight and out-solos the competition with a blazing display of look-at-me-look-at-me-look-at-me fretacularity. </p> <p><em>Psssst</em>... don't tell Mr. Shred, but he's usually playing in the Masturbatoryian mode. </p> <p>Perhaps that's why some of rock's most enduring acts feature two guitarists—because, like sex, playing with yourself is only half the fun!</p> <p>Check out our guide to the top 10 guitar tandems of all time. Be sure to add your own choices (and comments) in the comments section below. We know you will.</p> <p>Pictured, by the way, <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-world-magazine-covers-gallery-every-issue-1980-1986">is our July 1984 cover.</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/acdc">AC/DC</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/aerosmith">Aerosmith</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/guns-n039-roses">Guns N&#039; Roses</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/top-10-guitar-tandems-all-time#comments Angus Young Duane Allman GO October 2004 Guitar One Joe Perry Slash News Features Mon, 22 Jun 2015 09:53:34 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24610 at http://www.guitarworld.com Ozzy Osbourne Recruits Slash and Tom Morello for Voodoo Music + Arts Show http://www.guitarworld.com/ozzy-osbourne-recruits-slash-and-tom-morello-voodoo-music-arts-show <!--paging_filter--><p>Ozzy Osbourne will headline the Voodoo Music + Arts Experience in New Orleans October 31. </p> <p>For his performance, the Black Sabbath singer will be supported by band that includes guitarists Slash and Rage Against the Machine's Tom Morello, plus Osbourne’s Black Sabbath bandmate bassist Geezer Butler.</p> <p>Back in March, Sabbath announced that they'd perform their farewell show at Ozzfest Japan on November 21 and 22. However, just a short time later, it was announced that the show would actually feature Osbourne and a lineup of friends.</p> <p>Maybe these are the friends?</p> <p>As for that final Black Sabbath show, there’s no indication of when—or even if—it will happen. Butler recently told NME he had “absolutely no idea” if it would actually happen. “I’d love to keep going,” he said. “I’d desperately want to keep going before I kick the bucket.”</p> <p>Added Sabbath guitarist Tony Iommi, “It’d be lovely to do a last tour. It’d be really nice to do that.”</p> <p>In other Sabbath news, the group’s first eight albums are set to be reissued on vinyl this summer. The series kicks off June 22 with the release of Sabbath’s self-titled debut, <em>Paranoid</em> and <em>Master of Reality.</em> They’ll be followed June 29 by <em>Vol. 4, Sabbath Bloody Sabbath</em> and <em>Sabotage.</em> The series release concludes July 13 with <em>Technical Ecstacy</em> and <em>Never Say Die.</em></p> <p>Voodoo Music + Arts Experience takes place October 30 through November 1. Other headliners include Florence + the Machine and the Zac Brown Band. Also scheduled are Modest Mouse, Jane’s Addiction, Giorgio Moroder, the Cult and Fishbone. You can see <a href="http://worshipthemusic.com/lineup/">the full lineup here.</a></p> <p>Tickets for the 2015 Voodoo Music + Arts Experience go on sale noon EST June 23. Three-day passes cost $150, and VIP passes are available for $500.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/ozzy-osbourne">Ozzy Osbourne</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/tom-morello">Tom Morello</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/ozzy-osbourne-recruits-slash-and-tom-morello-voodoo-music-arts-show#comments Ozzy Osbourne Slash Tom Morello News Fri, 19 Jun 2015 14:19:18 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24769 at http://www.guitarworld.com Session Guitar: Top 10 Guitarists to Emulate for a Successful Studio Career http://www.guitarworld.com/session-guitar-top-10-guitarists-emulate-successful-studio-career <!--paging_filter--><p>I'd like to address a very meat-and-potatoes bit of info that very rarely gets mentioned. </p> <p>Who should you emulate in order to be a session guitarist? </p> <p>The answers and the reasons for each might very well surprise you. Also, you might assume you know how to play like these guys, but, until you really try it, you do <em>not</em> know how! </p> <p>I'm not kidding here; I guarantee you don't know how. And not a week goes by when I'm not asked to imitate at least one of these guys.</p> <p>So now, in the photo gallery below (in no particular order), I give you a list of players you'd better become intimately aware of and learn at least a few of their licks! It will start, save and prolong your "studio guitarist" career.</p> <p>One more thing before I start: These names are used in the way "Kleenex" means "tissue." If someone asks you for a Kleenex and you give them an off-brand tissue, it's the really same thing. So if someone asks for EVH, you know they want some tapping, whammy bar, bluesy, fast playing. Get it?</p> <p>One final note! Learn the history of popular music as seen through the eyes of a guitarist. Play in a wedding band. Play in a show band. Play in a cover band. You will thank me.</p> <p><em><a href="http://www.ronzabrocki.com/fr_home.cfm">Ron Zabrocki</a> is a session guitarist from New York, now living in Connecticut. Says Ron: "I started playing at age 6, sight reading right off the bat. That’s how I was taught, so I just thought everyone started that way. I could sight read anything within a few years, and that helped me become a session guy later in life. I took lessons from anyone I could find and had some wonderful instructors, including John Scofield, Joe Pass and Alan DeMausse. I’ve played several jingle sessions (and have written a few along the way). I’ve “ghosted” for a few people who shall remain nameless, but they get the credit and I get the money! I’ve played sessions in every style, from pop to jazz.</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/chuck-berry">Chuck Berry</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eddie-van-halen">Eddie Van Halen</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/session-guitar-top-10-guitarists-emulate-successful-studio-career#comments Eddie Van Halen Eric Clapton Ron Zabrocki Roy Clark Session Guitar Slash Blogs Galleries News Wed, 27 May 2015 11:14:09 +0000 Ron Zabrocki 23171 at http://www.guitarworld.com Video: Five Great Electric Guitarists Perform on Acoustic http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-video-5-great-electric-guitarists-perform-acoustic <!--paging_filter--><p>There’s a particular excitement felt at concerts when you notice the guitarist slip his electric guitar off his shoulder, reach for an acoustic guitar, sit down and play an old hit or rarity. </p> <p>The complexity of a song broken down into simple chords and strums can totally transform the tone into a special performance, reminiscent of traveling back in time to the demo session of its formation. </p> <p>Becoming an electric guitar superstar is often defined by a signature styles; it's easy to recognize a player based on the style, sound and tone they create with their equally famous guitars. Beautiful acoustic performances by these heroes are often overlooked by the general public, because they are not in-your-face jams. </p> <p>Here are five great live videos of shredders stripped down to the basics, showing their skills on an acoustic axe.</p> <p><strong>Buckethead</strong></p> <p>This performance of “What Kind Of Nation” comes from an extensive but largely unknown musical collaboration between Buckethead and actor Viggo Mortensen. Listen halfway through for the masked guitar hero playing a familiar Ozzy Osbourne tune. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/fddfX3BqM_g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>John 5 </strong></p> <p>Fittingly named, “Noche Acosador” takes a break from John 5’s signature industrial metal sound to a brilliant display of flamenco-influenced acoustic instrumental.</p> <p> <iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/c0QlJaJStZs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Zakk Wylde </strong></p> <p>Wylde revisits his first venture as a frontman from his southern-rock-rooted <em>Pride &amp; Glory</em> album in this soul-filled performance. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/G9YI0W52C3Y" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Slash, Tom Morello and Jerry Cantrell</strong></p> <p>Three of alternative rock’s greatest guitarists mellow out with some Pink Floyd at Tom Morello’s Justice Tour to raise money and awareness for homeless advocacy groups.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/WEbN9YgpHF4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Metallica </strong></p> <p>Neil Young’s annual charity concert for the Bridge School is a great showcase of acoustic performances and has taken place every year since 1986. Check out this awesome acoustic rendition of the <em>Master of Puppets</em> classic, “Disposable Heroes.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/a7jtl-XumPw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> http://www.guitarworld.com/acoustic-nation-video-5-great-electric-guitarists-perform-acoustic#comments acoustic guitar Acoustic Nation Buckethead Jerry Cantrell John 5 Metallica Slash Tom Morello Zakk Wylde Blogs Videos Fri, 24 Apr 2015 02:02:23 +0000 Melanie Gottshall 19845 at http://www.guitarworld.com Pedal to the Metal: The 25 Greatest Wah Solos of All Time http://www.guitarworld.com/pedal-metal-25-greatest-wah-solos-all-time <!--paging_filter--><p>Since the guitar's inception, there have been countless talented players who could make the instrument sing, but it wasn't until the mid-Sixties and the arrival of the wah pedal that guitarists could make it cry.</p> <p>Perhaps because it entered the collective consciousness at the hands—or feet, rather—of guitar gods like Jimi Hendrix and Eric Clapton, the wah pedal has been a vital part of the rock and roll lexicon since it was introduced by Vox, finding favor with guitarists who wanted to bring a whole new level of expressive possibilities to their playing. </p> <p>More than any other effect pedal, the wah has played a key role in some of modern guitar's shining moments, from Slash's epic, ascending run in "Sweet Child O' Mine" to Eddie Hazel making wah synonymous with funk in the Seventies to Hendrix simply doing that voodoo that he did so well. </p> <p>In honor of its place in rock history, the <em>Guitar World</em> staff recently picked out the very best wah solo moments of all time, each a snapshot of a great guitarist letting his voice be heard through a truly rock and roll pedal. Of course, we considered the quality of the solo itself and the song's iconic status in the world of rock and roll.</p> <p><strong>25. "1969" — The Stooges (<em>The Stooges</em>, 1969)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Ron Asheton </p> <p>Raw, visceral and distorted to the max, Ron Asheton's solo on this Stooges classic may not win any composition awards, but it was the perfect compliment to Iggy Pop's gutteral snarl.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/k0mRfECsHrc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>24. "Walk Away" — James Gang (<em>Thirds</em>, 1971)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Joe Walsh</p> <p>It comes in just at the end of the song, but Joe Walsh's solo spot on "Walk Away" is a bit of a late-in-the-game show-stealer. Since 2007, Walsh has had his very own <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/say-wah-five-essential-signature-wah-pedals?page=0,3">signature wah</a> made by Real McCoy Custom.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/ICmD8P0x8_M" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>23. "Cult of Personality" — Living Colour (<em>Vivid</em>, 1988)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Vernon Reid</p> <p>"Cult of Personality" was the song that instantly made Vernon Reid a household name in the alt metal community, combining manic use of the wah with a stream-of-conscious flurry of notes straight from the mind of a true guitar junky. Even more impressive, Reid stated in a 1988 <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/archive-living-colour-guitarist-vernon-reid-talks-vivid-1988-interview"><em>Guitar World</em> interview</a> that the solo was a first take.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/7xxgRUyzgs0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>22. "25 or 6 to 4" — Chicago (<em>Chicago</em>, 1970)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Terry Kath</p> <p>On the second half of a lengthy guitar solo on this Chicago classic, Terry Kath introduces a distortion-drenched, wah-driven guitar line that melds incredibly well with the song's horn section. Fun fact: Kath was once referred to as "the best guitar player in the universe" by Jimi Hendrix.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/WLiuMkGCOC4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>21. "Maggot Brain" — Funkadelic (<em>Maggot Brain</em>, 1971)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Eddie Hazel</p> <p>On the opposite end of the the spectrum from the ultra-tight, ultra-clean guitar sounds many listeners identify with funk is Eddie Hazel's tone on this 10-plus-minute track from Funkadelic, which features no vocals and serves primarily as a vehicle for Hazel to explore the deepest reaches of space in his wah-wah-powered mothership.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/a9MgoRIXEqc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>20. "Stop" — Jane's Addiction (<em>Ritual de lo habitual</em>, 1990)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Dave Navarro</p> <p>Written all the way back in 1986, it would take four years for this <em>Ritual de lo habitual</em> cut to be unleashed upon the music world as large, climbing to No. 1 on the <em>Billboard</em> Modern Rock Tracks behind the strength of a high-energy performance from vocalist Perry Farrell and a muscular, wah-driven lead from Dave Navarro.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/ZwI02OHtZTg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>19. "The Needle and the Spoon" — Lynyrd Skynyrd (<em>Second Helping</em>, 1974)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Allen Collins</p> <p>A clear tip of the hat to Eric Clapton's solo from "White Room," Allen Collins pulls out the wah to blend Sixties psychedelia seamlessly into a bona-fide Southern-rock classic.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/bFPaxK-q5gI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>18. "If You Have to Ask" — Red Hot Chili Peppers (<em>Blood Sugar Sex Magik</em>, 1991)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> John Frusciante</p> <p>On this cut from 1991's mega-selling <em>Blood Sugar Sex Magik</em>, Chili Peppers guitarist John Frusciante turns in a sparse, stop-start wah solo fitting for the song's funk-rock minimalism. Fun fact: On the studio version, you can hear the band and production crew applauding Frusciante's guitar work as the song comes to an end.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/dii6bZT0V74" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>17. "Whole Lotta Love" — Led Zeppelin (<em>Led Zeppelin II</em>, 1969)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong></p> <p>While much of the bizzare, alien soundscape in the middle section of "Whole Lotta Love" is directly attributable to Jimmy Page's groundbreaking use of backwards tape echo and Page and engineer Eddie Kramer "twiddling every knob known to man," the wah pedal does make an appearance, adding a valuable, extra dimension to Page's most otherworldly guitar work this side of the <em>Lucifer Rising</em> soundtrack.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/Mln0RciE2o0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>16. "The Joker" — Steve Miller Band (<em>The Joker</em>, 1973)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Steve Miller</p> <p>Perfect for all those midnight tokers out there, Steve Miller's laid-back lead work on "The Joker" doesn't go overboard on the wah, opting instead for the tasteful, restrained approach. Fun fact: This song shot back to the top of the charts in 1990, thanks to a popular ad for Levi's jeans.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/DzSC2__LXk4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>15. "I Ain't Superstitious" — Jeff Beck Group (<em>Truth</em>, 1968)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Jeff Beck</p> <p>On the debut album from the Jeff Beck Group, Beck uses this wah-laden take on a Howlin' Wolf tune to show off his mastery of the multitude of sounds one can coax out of a guitar. Somehow, he still continues to baffle us with this skill.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/mQFdHlxMhZ0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>14. "Blue on Black" — Kenny Wayne Shepherd (<em>Trouble Is ...</em>, 1997)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Kenny Wayne Shepherd</p> <p>Kenny Wayne Shepherd burst into the mainstream consciousness with this cut off his 1997 album, <em>Trouble Is ...</em> Any questions over who he was hoping to channel are laid to rest with the inclusion of a cover of "Voodoo Child" as the single's B-side.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/V94pBlA4n7U" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>13. "Pain and Sorrow" — Joe Bonamassa (<em>So, It's Like That</em>, 2002</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Joe Bonamassa</p> <p>Another blues-rock revivalist, Joe Bonamassa lays out some fiery wah work on this deep cut from his sophomore album, <em>So, It's Like That</em>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/tjEOxHrM-Xo" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>12. "Blinded by the Light" — Manfred Mann's Earth Band (<em>The Roaring Silence</em>, 1976)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Dave Flett</p> <p>This tune may have originally been written by Bruce Springsteen, but it didn't become a hit—and eventually a classic—until guitarist Dave Flett and the rest of Manfred Mann's Earth Band got a hold of it for 1976's <em>The Roaring Silence</em>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/OlBifX0H3yg" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>11. "Gets Me Through" — Ozzy Osbourne (<em>Down to Earth</em>, 2001)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Zakk Wylde</p> <p>Split between powerful melodies and a heaping helping of shred, the solo from "Gets Me Through" sees Zakk Wylde take his Hendrix Cry Baby to the edge and back on this standout track from Ozzy's 2001 comeback record. </p> <p>Zakk would eventually merit his <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/say-wah-five-essential-signature-wah-pedals">very own wah pedal, complete with the Fasel inductor that was responsible for some of the classic wah sounds of the Sixties.</a></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/sthHMnytQOs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>10. "Surfing with the Alien" — Joe Satriani (<em>Surfing with the Alien</em>, 1987)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Joe Satriani</p> <p>"Surfing with the Alien" sees Joe Satriani put the pedal to the metal in every conceivable sense, not the least of which is his stunning work with the wah pedal. </p> <p>Paired with a Tubedriver and a classic Eventide 949, the wah provides just enough control over his alien tone for Satch to weave his way in and out of an asteroid belt of notes.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/uoERl34Ld00" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>09. "Turn Up the Night" — Black Sabbath (<em>Mob Rules</em>, 1981)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Tony Iommi</p> <p>It's a rare occasion when Tony Iommi brings out the wah, but on this <em>Mob Rules</em> cut, the Godfather of Heavy Metal uses it too great effect, upping the aggression level one step further on what may be his most furious studio solo.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/qeepyLDSqgA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>08. "Telephone Song" — Vaughan Brothers (<em>Family Style</em>, 1990)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Stevie Ray Vaughan</p> <p>Were you expecting to see the long-winded instrumental "Say What!" from Vaughan's <em>Soul to Soul</em> album? Not a chance, not when this mini-masterpiece of a wah solo exists. </p> <p>Even without the wah, it's one of his best-constructed, catchiest solos. This track comes from SRV's first full album with his brother, Jimmie Vaughan—which, sadly, turned out to be his last record.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/CYgIQF6WgPU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>07. "Bad Horsie" — Steve Vai (<em>Alien Love Secrets</em>, 1995)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Steve Vai</p> <p>Like Hendrix before him, Steve Vai wanted to take the wah pedal to its limits, and he accomplished just that on his 1995 EP, <em>Alien Love Secrets</em>. </p> <p>And in all due fairness to the remaining songs on the list, "Bad Horsie" remains the only track in this whole feature to have its own wah <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/say-wah-five-essential-signature-wah-pedals?page=0,2">named after it</a>. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/BJfhFZ684SU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>06. "Even Flow" — Pearl Jam (<em>Ten</em>, 1991)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Mike McCready</p> <p>"That's me pretending to be Stevie Ray Vaughan," Pearl Jam guitarist Mike McCready told <em>Guitar World</em> of his classic solo from "Even Flow" back in 1995. </p> <p>A fitting tribute to the late SRV, the solo saw McCready break out the wah and churn out perhaps the most iconic solo of the grunge era.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/tkbgtVFlyCQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <hr /> <p><strong>05. "A New Level" — Pantera (<em>Vulgar Display of Power</em>, 1992)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Dimebag Darrell</p> <p>Dimebag Darrell is among those guitarists that utilized the wah pedal more subtly, using it as a tone control in most cases. This isn't one of those cases. </p> <p>Darrell's use of the wah on his "A New Level" solo is as surgically precise as one comes to expect from the master craftsman, lending an all new connotation to the phrase, "on a Dime."</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/77f8u7puTFc" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>04. "Enter Sandman" — Metallica (<em>Metallica</em>, 1991)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Kirk Hammett</p> <p>We're going to let Kirk take this one: "There's something about a wah pedal that really gets my gut going! </p> <p>People will probably say, 'He's just hiding behind the wah.' But that isn't the case. It's just that those frequencies really bring out a lot of aggression in my approach." (Read the full 1991 interview with James and Kirk <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/metallicas-james-hetfield-and-kirk-hammett-talk-guitar-solos-and-gear-1991-guitar-world-interview">here</a>)</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/CD-E-LDc384" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>03. "Sweet Child O' Mine" — Guns N' Roses (<em>Appetite for Destruction</em>, 1987)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Slash</p> <p>Known to break out the wah and fiddle around with "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" as a live lead-in for "Civil War," Slash forged his own piece of rock and roll history with his unforgettable ascending run into one of the shining moments in Eighties guitar rock. </p> <p>Bookended by the feral yowl of frontman Axl Rose, Slash makes this would-be ballad anything but with a fierce lead made possible by a stock Cry Baby wah.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/1w7OgIMMRc4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>02. "White Room" — Cream (<em>Wheels of Fire</em>, 1968)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Eric Clapton</p> <p>A masterful performance on "Tales of Brave Ulysses aside," with "White Room," Eric Clapton virtually wrote the book on how the wah pedal would be used in the context of rock guitar for decades to come. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://www.youtube-nocookie.com/embed/pkae0-TgrRU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>01. "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" — The Jimi Hendrix Experience (<em>Electric Ladyland</em>, 1968)</strong><br /> <strong>Soloist:</strong> Jimi Hendrix</p> <p>The go-to song of any guitarist trying out a new wah pedal at Guitar Center, "Voodoo Child (Slight Return)" stands as a mammoth moment in rock history, setting a mark that has yet to be breached by any ambitious guitarist with a Cry Baby and a dream. </p> <p>Of the song's recording, engineer Eddie Kramer recalls that the track "was recorded the day after Jimi tracked 'Voodoo Chile,' the extended jam on <em>Electric Ladyland</em> featuring Traffic’s Stevie Winwood on organ and Jefferson Airplane bassist Jack Casady. </p> <p>Basically, Jimi used the same setup — his Strat through a nice, warm Fender Bassman amp. Jimi’s sound on both tracks is remarkably consistent, leading some to think they were recorded at the same session.” Stevie Ray Vaughan's version is no slouch either, by the way. </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/6OTvz1lJzmI" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/eric-clapton">Eric Clapton</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jeff-beck">Jeff Beck</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/steve-vai">Steve Vai</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/joe-satriani">Joe Satriani</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/pedal-metal-25-greatest-wah-solos-all-time#comments Cream Eric Clapton Guns N' Roses Jimi Hendrix Metallica Slash Stevie Ray Vaughan Guitar World Lists News Features Fri, 20 Mar 2015 14:30:40 +0000 Guitar World Staff, Intro by Josh Hart 16934 at http://www.guitarworld.com Staged Fight: Slash's Eternal Guitar Solo "Upsets" Michael Jackson — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/staged-fight-slashs-eternal-guitar-solo-upsets-michael-jackson-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Remember the time Slash overstayed his welcome during a live appearance with Michael Jackson?</p> <p>We didn't either—until we stumbled upon this wacky video!</p> <p>In the clip, which you can check out below, it <em>seems</em> as though Slash reeeeally doesn't wasn't to get off the stage—and doesn't want his guitar solo to end. </p> <p>Meanwhile, an "outraged" Jackson keeps dancing, hoping Slash will take the hint ... but he doesn't. Jackson even sidles up to the guitarist and tells him (OK, screams at him!) to stop playing ... to no avail. Next, Jackson's crew gets involved, and Slash fights them off!</p> <p>Obviously, this event was staged—a total fake. We all know Slash is a humble guy and one of the nicest personalities in rock. Either way, the clip is enjoyable in its own deranged way. </p> <p>Thoughts? If you have anything to add, let us know in the comments or on Facebook!</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/9lxN7x8JVKM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/staged-fight-slashs-eternal-guitar-solo-upsets-michael-jackson-video#comments Michael Jackson Slash Videos News Tue, 10 Feb 2015 18:19:13 +0000 Damian Fanelli 21612 at http://www.guitarworld.com Foo Fighters Enlist Van Halen's David Lee Roth, Slash, Kiss' Paul Stanley and More for Dave Grohl's Birthday Show http://www.guitarworld.com/foo-fighters-enlist-david-lee-roth-slash-paul-stanley-and-more-dave-grohls-birthday-show <!--paging_filter--><p>Late last week, when Foo Fighters told the universe about frontman Dave Grohl's "surprise" birthday show scheduled for this past Saturday at the Forum in LA, we knew we'd have some interesting clips to share with you this morning. Turns out we were correct!</p> <p>Below, check out freshly posted, fan-filmed videos of Foo Fighters performing with:</p> <p>01. A newly bald <strong>David Lee Roth</strong> for a version of Van Halen's "Panama" and "Ain't Talkin' Bout Love"</p> <p>02. <strong>Tenacious D</strong> and <strong>Slash</strong> for Led Zeppelin's "Immigrant Song"</p> <p>03. <strong>Paul Stanley</strong> for a version of Kiss' "Do You Love Me?" </p> <p>Of course, we'll have more videos for you as they become available on YouTube. In the meantime, enjoy the following three clips!</p> <p>According to <em>Rolling Stone,</em> Zakk Wylde, Lemmy Kilmeister of Motorhead, Perry Farrell of Jane's Addiction and Trombone Shorty also made appearances during the marathon set. That didn't stop the band from making their way through a host of Foo Fighters hits, including "Learning to Fly" and "Everlong."</p> <p><strong>DAVID LEE ROTH, "Panama" and "Ain't Talkin' Bout Love"</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/OuctDsNYjNE" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>TENACIOUS D and SLASH, "Immigrant Song":</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/jHMsO-5VRqY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PAUL STANLEY, "Do You Love Me?":</strong><br /> <iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/w31y2MYkUUw" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/foo-fighters">Foo Fighters</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/david-lee-roth">David Lee Roth</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/paul-stanley">Paul Stanley</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/kiss">Kiss</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/foo-fighters-enlist-david-lee-roth-slash-paul-stanley-and-more-dave-grohls-birthday-show#comments David Lee Roth Foo Fighters Kiss Led Zeppelin Paul Stanley Slash Tenacious D Van Halen Videos News Mon, 12 Jan 2015 15:40:07 +0000 Damian Fanelli 23263 at http://www.guitarworld.com Slash Performs "Nightrain" and "Bent to Fly" Live from the Sunset Strip — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/slash-performs-nightrain-and-bent-fly-live-sunset-strip-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Tonight, DIRECTV will air <em>Slash Featuring Myles Kennedy and The Conspirators Live from the Sunset Strip</em>, a 90-minute special that captures highlights of the guitar legend's recent show at the Roxy in West Hollywood.</p> <p>Below, you can check out two pro-shot clips from the show. Enjoy live performances of "Nightrain" (top video) and "Bent to Fly" (middle).</p> <p>The show, which airs 9 p.m. today (November 7) on DIRECTV (channel 239), brings a rock legend back to the stages where his career began: the Sunset Strip. It was filmed in 4k and 5.1 surround sound and includes songs from his 2014 album, <em>World on Fire</em>, plus a host of classic Guns N’ Roses and Velvet Revolver tunes. </p> <p>While we're on the topic of Slash, note that a new documentary titled <em>Slash: Raised on the Sunset Strip</em>, is set to air November 13. The film, which was directed by Martyn Atkins, takes viewers into the studio with the guitarist, combining new and archival footage with interviews from artists and colleagues who influenced his career. </p> <p>It features appearances by Dave Grohl, Alice Cooper, Joe Perry, Nikki Six, Duff McKagan, Steven Alder, Matt Sorum, Jerry Cantrell, Lemmy, Dave Mustaine, Marc Canter, Alan Niven and more. You can watch a trailer of the film below (the bottom clip).</p> <p>Anyway, enjoy this healthy dose of Slash, and tune in tonight for more!</p> <p><strong>"Nightrain" from <em>Live from the Sunset Strip</em>:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/SfvfHD3LS4k" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>"Bent to Fly" from <em>Live from the Sunset Strip</em>:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/x0ctImlIThY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <strong><em>Slash: Raised on the Sunset Strip</em> Trailer:</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/TS5h5NHc1XY" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/slash-performs-nightrain-and-bent-fly-live-sunset-strip-video#comments Slash Videos News Fri, 07 Nov 2014 13:50:49 +0000 Damian Fanelli 22806 at http://www.guitarworld.com Slash Discusses His New Album with Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators, 'World on Fire' http://www.guitarworld.com/slash-discusses-his-new-album-myles-kennedy-and-conspirators-world-fire <!--paging_filter--><p><strong><em>This is an excerpt from the December 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this Slash story, plus features on Slipknot, Joe Bonamassa, Lenny Kravitz, Paul Gilbert, Motionless In White, Electric Wizard and more, including lessons, tabs and reviews of new gear from D'Angelico, Washburn, Boss, Morley, Lace Music and Carr Amps, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=SlashExcerpt">check out the December 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></strong></p> <p><strong>Slash and Burn: Everyone’s favorite hard-rocking riffmaster returns with <em>World on Fire</em>, his new searing-hot album with Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators.</strong></p> <p>When <em>Guitar World</em> catches up with Slash, it’s still weeks before the release of <em>World on Fire</em>, his new and second album with his band, Myles Kennedy and the Conspirators. And yet, he, Kennedy, bassist Todd Kerns and drummer Brent Fitz have already been out on the road supporting the album for more than a month, opening up a string of arena shows for Slash’s old friends in Aerosmith.</p> <p> “We hadn’t planned on being out this summer,” he admits. “But it sounded like such a great rock and roll package, and there’s so much camaraderie between the bands. So it was something we decided to tack on in front of the album release and tour.”</p> <p> For Slash, the extra gigs seem to be par for the course. Despite now being more than a quarter century into his recording career, the 49-year-old musician and established guitar legend is working and playing as hard as ever. In the past few years alone, he’s recorded and released a star-studded solo album [2010’s <em>Slash</em>], an effort with Kennedy and the Conspirators [2012’s <em>Apocalyptic Love</em>] and a full soundtrack album to a movie on which he served as producer [2013’s <em>Nothing Left to Fear</em>].</p> <p> And then there’s the new <em>World on Fire</em>. Slash began working on the album almost immediately after coming off the tour for <em>Apocalyptic Love</em>, and the result is another bold and unapologetically riffy statement, exemplified in high-octane barnburners like the title track, “30 Years to Life” and “Avalon.” But there’s also plenty of diversity in the album’s 17—yes, 17—tracks, from the epic “Iris of the Storm” and the cinematic, dark-hued “The Unholy,” to the soaring pop-rock workout “The Dissident” and the instrumental guitar showcase “Safari Inn.”</p> <p>It’s a varied, immersive and incredibly hard-rocking effort, and one that, Slash says, is a product of the exceptional musical relationship he enjoys with his current band. Working with Kennedy and the Conspirators, he says, “feels as solid, if not more so, than anything I’ve done in a really long time.” And so, while the outfit gears up for another worldwide jaunt in support of World on Fire, Slash is already looking toward the future. “I was backstage before our show at the Forum [in Inglewood, California] the other day, and I actually recorded the first new idea toward the next record,” he says. “So I’m excited to jam it at soundcheck with the guys.” He laughs. “Not that I’m thinking that far ahead.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="http://cache.vevo.com/m/html/embed.html?video=US9T51400038" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>EXCERPT: You stayed out on the road for a year and a half in support of <em>Apocalyptic Love</em>, and it seems as if right after that tour ended you started work on <em>World on Fire</em>. </strong></p> <p>It did happen pretty fast. The tour finished up in July [2013] and I took some time to hang out at home. Because every time I go out on the road, I’m more or less gone for a year. So you come home and you chill out for a minute and decompress. But by September, I was getting anxious. I started picking through the ideas I had recorded into my phone on the road and seeing which ones I wanted to pursue. Then I think it was in October that I started going into the studio a couple days a week to jam with Brent and Todd. I didn’t have a deadline or anything like that, but we started jamming and it started moving. We had a lot of material pretty quickly. Then Myles came in and we started hashing out the arrangements. And the next thing you know, Mike [producer Michael “Elvis” Baskette] was over and we were knee deep in pre-production.</p> <p><strong>Did you say that when you’re on the road you record song ideas into your phone?</strong></p> <p>I do. [laughs] On an acoustic-electric. I have all the tools to record proper demos; I have Pro Tools on my laptop. But, you know, anything that takes more than two seconds to set up, I just hate doing it. If I have to pull out some guitar cords and hook the thing up, put some headphones on, do all that shit, by the time I’m ready to go I don’t even feel like it anymore. I have to strike the second the inspiration happens. And the phone is the fastest fucking way to just put down an idea.</p> <p><strong>Can you point to any material on the new album that came from a phone riff?</strong></p> <p>Every song. [laughs] Actually, there are two that have older origins. One is “Dirty Girl,” which came from demos I made back when I was doing the first solo record. The other is “Shadow Life.” The main riff in that song was actually a part of “You’re a Lie” [from <em>Apocalyptic Love</em>]. We were just about to record “You’re a Lie” and I started realizing the chorus wasn’t working. As much as I hated to do it, I pulled out the coolest riff in the song and came up with another idea for the chorus. But I’ve always loved the riff I pulled out and I didn’t want to lose it. And the thing is, I have a really hard time going back and revisiting old stuff. I hate doing it and I won’t do it. It’s like pulling teeth to me. </p> <p>But this one riff—when we started on this record everybody wanted to see where we were gonna go with it. And that riff became “Shadow Life.” That was actually the one song on the record that Todd had some input on as well. He wrote the verse, and that really sort of helped steer the direction of the song away from sounding like “You’re a Lie.”</p> <p><strong>This record has a lot of music on it, and also a lot of diversity.</strong></p> <p>It’s just what was coming out. I sit around in dressing rooms and hotel rooms—probably all the time I used to spend out at the bar—and I just write. And I write a lot of different types of stuff. I think that’s one of the reasons I jam with a lot of different sorts of people, just to not be pigeonholed into one style. It’s not a conscious thing, but I like different types of things and I like to play them.<br /> And with Myles, I’ve found that anything I come up with, if I think it’s good, I can present it to him and nine times out of 10 he’ll come up with a melody for it. And that really broadens the scope so that I can actually do a lot of stuff that I maybe wouldn’t be able to do with the likes of, say, Velvet Revolver. Even with GN’R, back in the day, there were certain songs I ended up doing with other people because they didn’t work with Guns.</p> <p><strong>Like what?</strong></p> <p>A good example is “Always on the Run” [which appeared on Lenny Kravitz’s 1991 album, <em>Mama Said</em>]. I wrote it during Guns, but I don’t remember there ever being any interest in it from the guys. So it was just a riff I had that Lenny happened to hear me playing. It wasn’t something I presented to him. He heard me playing it in the recording studio when I was doing “Fields of Joy” [Slash contributes guitar to this track, also from Mama Said]. I guess in between takes or something I was fucking with that riff, and Lenny was like, “Oh, what’s that?” And that’s how that happened. </p> <p><em>Photo: Travis Shinn</em></p> <p><strong><em>This is an excerpt from the December 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the rest of this Slash story, plus features on Slipknot, Joe Bonamassa, Lenny Kravitz, Paul Gilbert, Motionless In White, Electric Wizard and more, including lessons, tabs and reviews of new gear from D'Angelico, Washburn, Boss, Morley, Lace Music and Carr Amps, <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-december-14-slipknot/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=SlashExcerpt">check out the December 2014 issue at the Guitar World Online Store.</a></em></strong></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-10-07%20at%2010.21.37%20AM.png" width="620" height="807" alt="Screen Shot 2014-10-07 at 10.21.37 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/slash">Slash</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/slash-discusses-his-new-album-myles-kennedy-and-conspirators-world-fire#comments December 2014 Slash Interviews News Features Magazine Tue, 14 Oct 2014 16:48:12 +0000 Richard Bienstock 22566 at http://www.guitarworld.com