In Deep with Andy Aledort http://www.guitarworld.com/taxonomy/term/139/all en Stevie Ray Vaughan Lesson: How to Play "Couldn't Stand the Weather" http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather <!--paging_filter--><p>Stevie Ray Vaughan’s distinctive playing style is earmarked by equal parts pure power, intensity of focus, razor-sharp precision and deeply emotional conviction. And then there’s his tone—probably the best Stratocaster-derived sound ever evoked from the instrument. </p> <p>Stevie tuned his guitar down one half step (low to high, Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb), a move inspired by one of his biggest influences, Jimi Hendrix. He also preferred heavy gauge strings: high to low, .013, .015, .019, .028, .038, .058, occasionally switching the high E string to either a .012 or .011. To facilitate the use of such heavy strings, Stevie’s guitars were re-fretted with large Dunlop 6100 or Stewart-MacDonald 150 fretwire.</p> <p>Let’s begin this lesson with a look at the title track from Stevie’s second album, <em>Couldn’t Stand the Weather</em>. The song begins in “free time” (no strict tempo). </p> <p>While brother Jimmie Vaughan tremolo-strums the opening chords—Bm-A7-G7-F#7—Stevie adds improvised solo lines (see transcription bars 1-8): over Bm, Stevie sticks with the B blues scale (B D E F F# A), over A7 he utilizes the A blues scale (A C D Eb E G) and over G7 he uses G blues (G Bb C Db D F). Strive to recreate Stevie’s precision when it comes to his articulation. </p> <p>Over Jimmie’s F#7 chord, Stevie plays a first inversion F#7#9, which places the third of the chord, A#, in the bass (as the lowest note). (Stevie employed this same unusual voicing for E7#9 in “Cold Shot.”) </p> <p>A four-bar, R&amp;B/soul-style single-note riff follows, doubled in octaves by guitar and bass (see bars 9-17). Played four times, two extra beats of rest are added the third time through. This is shown as a bar of 6/4 in bar 13 of the transcription.</p> <p>In bars 18-23, Stevie adds a very Hendrix-y rhythm guitar part, played in 10th position and beginning on beat two with an F octave fretted on the G and high E strings, strummed in 16th notes. Stevie maintains the rhythmic push of steady 16ths through most of the riff by consistently strumming in a down-up-down-up “one-ee-and-a” pattern. </p> <p>At the end of bar 18, barre your middle finger across the top three strings at the 12th fret, and then bend and release the G and B strings one half step. As the notes are held into the next bar, add subtle finger vibrato. Keep your fret-hand thumb wrapped over the top of the fretboard throughout the riff, using it to fret the D root note on the low E string’s 10th fret. Stevie intersperses this low root note into the lick in a few essential spots, akin to Hendrix on his songs “Freedom” and “Izabella.” </p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/HppszdNQNXs" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_1.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie displays his true brilliance as an improviser when playing over a slow blues. All of the following examples are played in the key of G, utilizing the G blues scale (G Bb C Db D F) as a basis. Across the first two bars of <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I play two- and three-note chord figures against the low G and C root notes, fretted with the thumb. On beat three of both bars, I play a trill by barring the index finger across the D and G strings and then quickly hammering on and pulling off with the middle finger one fret higher on the G string. </p> <p>When playing bar 3, keep your index finger barred across the top two strings at the third fret while bending notes on the G and B strings. On beat two, quickly hammer on and pull off to the fourth fret on the high E string. This G-Ab-G hammer/pull is a staple for Stevie, used in myriad different and creative ways.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_2.jpg" /></p> <p>Another essential element of Stevie’s slow-blues lead playing approach is the use of Albert King–style multiple-string bends. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong>, I bend the high E string up one whole step at the eighth fret using the ring finger (supported by the middle) and simultaneously catch the B string under the fingertip and bend it up a whole step as well so that it “goes along for the ride.” In <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong>, I catch the top three strings under the fingertip. It will take practice to build up the strength and “finger traction” to execute these bends properly.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_3c4a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_4b.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURES 3a and 3b</strong> illustrate another way to add pull-offs on the high E string, this time fretting A and then pulling back from Ab to G. This is followed by repeated pull-offs on the B string, illustrated more clearly in <strong>FIGURE 3c. FIGURES 4a and 4b</strong> offer two more permutations of this idea.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5de.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_5f.jpg" /></p> <p>Another nod to Albert is the use of fingerpicking to accent notes on the high E string. I use my middle finger to pick and snap the string back against the fretboard, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURES 5a–5f</strong>. Notice in <strong>FIGURES 5b, 5c and 5e</strong> the use of a half-step bend at the seventh fret on the high E string. Albert was a master of microtonal bending, a technique learned well by Stevie.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Stevie devised some unique position shifts, utilizing bends and slides on the G string. <strong>FIGURES 6a–c</strong> present three examples. </p> <p>The use of the notes A, Ab and G on the high E string allude to the V (five) chord, D, and the D blues scale (D F G Gb A C). <strong>FIGURE 8a</strong> illustrates the scale, and <strong>FIGURES 7 and 8b–d</strong> offer examples played over the V chord. Another staple of Stevie’s style is the use of slides on the G string, exemplified in <strong>FIGURES 9a–c</strong>.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8ab.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_8d.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9a.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9b.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep710_9c.jpg" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimmie-vaughan">Jimmie Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-stevie-ray-vaughans-playing-couldnt-stand-weather#comments In Deep Jimmie Vaughan July 2010 Stevie Ray Vaughan Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort Blogs Lessons Magazine Thu, 27 Aug 2015 14:23:58 +0000 Andy Aledort 17124 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep Lesson with Andy Aledort: How to Play "Little Wing" by Jimi Hendrix http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-jimi-hendrixs-little-wing <!--paging_filter--><p>Jimi Hendrix's stature as rock's greatest guitarist is by now an absolute and indisputable fact. In this month's edition of "In Deep," I'll examine his genius within the realm of rhythm guitar.</p> <p>Let’s begin with a breakdown of the intro to the live version of “Little Wing,” transcribed in this issue [see page 136 of the December 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>]. Before we begin, keep in mind that, as was his nature, Jimi never played any song exactly the same way twice. </p> <p>Live or in the studio, he always strove for spontaneously inspired performances of every song. For guitarists, this offers a vast treasure of musical lessons to be learned when studying any one of Hendrix’s compositions.</p> <p>This version of “Little Wing,” recorded at what is acknowledged as the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s greatest live performance—on February 24, 1969, at London’s Albert Hall—differs in many subtle but fascinating ways from the studio track heard on <em>Axis: Bold as Love</em>. </p> <p>In the pickup and through bar 1, Jimi first strikes muted strings by lightly laying his fret hand across the fretboard. This is followed by an expressive slide down from the 12th fret; Jimi barres across the top two strings while lightly fretting the sixth string at the 12th fret by wrapping his thumb over the top of the fretboard.</p> <p>Across beats three and four, he works off a 12th-position Em7 chord shape, striking different pairs of strings in conjunction with single notes to create a “chord/melody” effect.</p> <p>In bar 2, Jimi plays a third-position G major chord by fretting the sixth-string bass note with his thumb and choosing not to barre the index finger across all six strings or fret the A string with the ring finger, which frees up his pinkie to embellish the chord with fast hammer-ons and pull-offs on the G and high E strings. The same approach is used for bar 3 over Am.</p> <p>Notice how he moves smoothly from sounding pairs of strings to single notes while weaving an evolving and forward-moving rhythm part. Back over Em7 on bar 4, Jimi uses the seventh-position shape to execute a series of delicate hammer-ons and pull-offs, setting up the chord change to Bm in the next bar, which is also played in seventh position.</p> <p>Using Bf to shift down to Am in fifth position, on beat two he begins with a ring-finger barre across the D, G and B strings at the seventh fret to hammer up to the ninth fret on the D string with the pinkie. This is followed by a full arpeggiation of C on beat three into incorporation of C/E on beat four, sliding up to E on the A string’s seventh fret.</p> <p>Bar 7 features Hendrix’s signature “sliding sus2” voicings, as Gsus2 slides up to Asus2 and then down to Fsus2. Though the thumb is used to fret the low bass notes throughout, keep this finger loose as to limit the amount of pressure that the palm of the hand exerts against the back of the neck. In bars 8 and 9, Jimi utilizes fifth-string-root voicings of C and D major, wrapping up the intro with chord-melody figures based on D/Fs.</p> <p>Let’s now expand on the rhythm techniques Jimi uses on this version of “Little Wing.” In <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, I begin with the same G major voicing found in bar 2, but I incorporate more elaborate hammer-ons and pull-offs on the top three strings as well as utilize quick finger slides and hammer-ons based on the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E).</p> <p>Another great example of Jimi’s inventiveness with this chord form is heard on his Monterey Pop version of Bob Dylan’s “Like a Rolling Stone.” In <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>, I fret only the sixth, fourth and second strings while sliding between G and Fsus2 chord voicings, incorporating the open G string throughout to provide a powerful sustaining quality.</p> <p>Similar in execution is Jimi’s rhythm part to the intro and verse sections of “Love or Confusion” from Are You Experienced. In <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I emulate this part by adding quick hammerons and pull-offs on the B and G strings within both the G5 and Fsus2 voicings. The “sliding sus2” chords of “Little Wing,” alluded to in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, also appear in another great Hendrix ballad, “Castles Made of Sand.” <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> offers an extended version of sliding these chord forms up and down the fretboard.</p> <p>Now let’s apply these techniques to a few chord progressions. In <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>, I move from sixth-string-root G, Am, Bm and C voicings back to G while adding quick hammers and pulls within each voicing. In <strong>FIGURE 7</strong>, a similar approach is taken for C-Bf-F along the lines of Hendrix’s classic “The Wind Cries Mary.” Live versions of this song reveal great inventiveness over the one chord, F, along the lines of <strong>FIGURES 8 and 9.</strong></p> <p>In <strong>FIGURE 10</strong>, fifth-string-root voicings are used to illustrate other chord embellishment ideas. As always, feel free to experiment with your own inventions once you have these techniques firmly under your fingers.</p> <p>The last example, <strong>FIGURE 11</strong>, illustrates a few more commonly used Hendrix techniques for embellishing a sixth-string-root chord, with quick hammer/pulls on the G string followed by a chord resolution to A/Cs. You’ll hear great examples of this on Jimi’s “Bold as Love.”</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="370" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/XKSjRfDfP5A?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.50.48%20PM.png" width="620" height="723" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.50.48 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.50.58%20PM.png" width="620" height="272" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.50.58 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.56.11%20PM.png" width="620" height="730" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.56.11 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202015-01-13%20at%202.56.20%20PM.png" width="620" height="407" alt="Screen Shot 2015-01-13 at 2.56.20 PM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/jimi-hendrix">Jimi Hendrix</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-jimi-hendrixs-little-wing#comments 2011 Andy Aledort December December 2011 In Deep Jimi Hendrix In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Jul 2015 13:07:40 +0000 Andy Aledort 13150 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Early Blues Masters John Lee Hooker and Lightnin' Hopkins — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-john-lee-hooker-and-lightnin-hopkins <!--paging_filter--><p>The blues is ripe for endless and constant reinvention. </p> <p>Through the decades, it has developed in many different incarnations. </p> <p>These include plantation field hollers; the acoustic guitar playing and songwriting mastery of Charlie Patton, Blind Blake, Blind Lemon Jefferson, Blind Willie McTell and Robert Johnson; the Chicago, Memphis and Texas blues of Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf and T-Bone Walker; and the mid-to-late-Sixties blues-rock revolution spearheaded by Cream and the Jimi Hendrix Experience. </p> <p>Today, bands such as the North Mississippi All-Stars, the Black Keys and Alabama Shakes continue to explore new ways to navigate the dark, swampy sounds honed through this long tradition of blues interpretation. In this edition of In Deep, we’ll be taking a look at the guitar work of two essential early blues guitar masters: John Lee Hooker and Lightnin’ Hopkins.</p> <p>John Lee Hooker was born in 1917 in Coahoma County, Mississippi, and learned to play guitar from his stepfather, Willie Moore, who, conveniently for John Lee, was friends with Blind Lemon Jefferson and Charlie Patton. Hooker went on the road at age 14, joining legendary bluesman Robert Nighthawk in Memphis. </p> <p>In 1948, Hooker began his recording career in style, cutting two incredible tunes—“Boogie Chillen’ ” and “Sally Mae”—at his first sessions, cut in Detroit. The songs were released on the Modern label, owned by the Bihari Brothers (who also recorded B.B. King’s earliest sides), and Hooker’s ascent to blues superstardom was underway. </p> <p>Hooker performed and recorded a great many tunes on both acoustic and electric guitar in open A tuning (low to high, E A E A C# E), oftentimes using a capo at the first, second or third fret to perform in different keys. He picked with his fingers, primarily using his thumb to strike the bass strings and index finger to pluck the higher strings, and achieved a warm and very percussive sound, often performing alone or with another guitarist for accompaniment. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_1.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a rhythm figure along the lines of “Boogie Chillen’.” Though written in 4/4, this figure is played with a triplet, or swing-eighths, feel, which means that notes indicated as pairs of eighth notes are actually sounded as a quarter note followed by an eighth note within a triplet bracket. </p> <p>Throughout this passage, the thumb and index finger alternate striking the lower and higher strings, with a quick, rolling double hammer-on occurring at the end of each bar. In bar 1, the hammer-on begins on the fourth fret and moves chromatically (one fret at a time) up to the sixth fret. In bar 2, the hammer-on starts on the second fret and moves up chromatically to the fourth fret. In bar 3, rapid slides up to the third fret are executed with an index-finger barre across the top two strings.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_2.jpg" /></p> <p>One of the fascinating aspects of Hooker’s open A playing was that he often used only two primary chords, the “I” (one) and the “IV” (four), forgoing the use of a “V” (five) chord that is common to the majority of blues music. In open A tuning, Hooker would use a standard C “cowboy” chord grip as his four chord, which yields an unusual Dadd9/C sound, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_3.jpg" /></p> <p>Another interesting aspect of Hooker’s solo work is that he would often shift from a swinging triplet feel to the use of even, or “straight,” eighth notes, which provides great rhythmic contrast and tension. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, I begin with straight eighths on a sliding A7 chord voicing and then move back to the swinging feel when the initial riff is restated in bars 5–7.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_4.jpg" /></p> <p>Hooker also often used the D7/A voicing shown in FIGURE 4 for his four chord: with the index finger barred across the top three strings at the fifth fret, the pinkie is added and removed from the high E string’s eighth fret. Robert Johnson often used this pattern to great effect as well.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_5.jpg" /></p> <p>Hooker devised some great and very distinct licks in open A tuning, a few of which are presented in <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>. Following index-finger slides on the top two strings, different A and A7 voicings are followed by great single-note and double-stop licks played on the middle strings using a bit of rhythmic syncopation. You can hear Hooker play riffs like these on his classic song “Sally Mae.” ZZ Top’s Billy Gibbons is a Hooker fanatic, and you can hear many of these kinds of licks on Top classics like “La Grange” and “Jesus Just Left Chicago.”</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Combining open strings with single-note riffs is a central element of Hooker’s style, made more effective with fingerpicking. FIGURE 6, inspired by “Crawling Kingsnake,” and FIGURE 7, a nod to “Tease Me,” offer a few more examples of how Hooker would combine a catchy melody with an insistent root-note, open-string pedal tone. </p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_8.jpg" /></p> <p>In later years, Hooker relied more often on standard tuning, while still using the capo on the first few frets for changing keys. A great example of his playing style in standard tuning can be heard on “Boom Boom Out Go the Lights.” <strong>FIGURE 8</strong> offers an example in this style, marrying a repeated melody, based on E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) to an alternating bass line. </p> <p>Lightnin’ Hopkins was born in 1912 in Centerville, Texas. Like Hooker, he learned directly from encounters with Blind Lemon Jefferson. He began his recording career in 1946 and went on to become one of the most influential blues guitarists ever. Elements of his style are clear in the playing of Jimi Hendrix, Eric Clapton, Jimmy Page, Jeff Beck, Stevie Ray Vaughan and just about everyone that played or plays blues guitar.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep1012_9.jpg" /></p> <p>Hopkins often performed unaccompanied acoustic guitar (or amplified acoustic), picking with his fingers in a manner similar to Hooker but with the use of a thumb pick. <strong>FIGURES 9 and 10</strong> offer examples of a mid-tempo swinging 12/8 blues played in his style, akin to his take on the blues classic “Goin’ Down Slow.”</p> <p><strong>Part 1</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/qVfzkTSFS9w" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe></p> <p><strong>Part 2</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1783865990001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1783865990001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-john-lee-hooker-and-lightnin-hopkins#comments In Deep John Lee Hooker Lightnin’ Hopkins October 2012 2012 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort Blogs Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 14 Jul 2015 21:31:39 +0000 Andy Aledort 16556 at http://www.guitarworld.com Freddie King Lesson: Going In Deep with a Blues Guitar Legend — with Video and Tab http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep <!--paging_filter--><p>Freddie King is among the triumvirate of the greatest and most influential electric blues guitarists ever, revered with equal respect alongside the legendary blues gods B.B. King and Albert King. </p> <p>Together, they are often referred to as "The Three Kings"—all complete masters of their craft and essential subjects of study for any inspiring blues guitar enthusiast. </p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we'll examine a few of the trademark Freddie King-isms that have earned him his rightful place as the forefront of electric blues guitar.</p> <p>Of the three Kings, Freddie had a hard-driving intensity that gave his guitar lines and solos a fiery spirit. And though he was blessed with what were arguably the most powerful vocal pipes of the three, he distinguished himself as a player and composer by penning the greatest blues guitar instrumentals in the genre’s history, such as the classic masterpieces “Hideaway,” “The Stumble,” “Sen-Sa- Shun,” “San-Ho-Zay,” “Side Tracked,” “In the Open,” and many others, all songs that have been covered brilliantly by such blues-rock heroes as Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck, Johnny Winter, ZZ Top and Stevie Ray Vaughan.</p> <p>Freddie King was born as Frederick Christian on September 3, 1934. Though his mother’s maiden name was King, in his early days as a performer he was thought to have changed his last name to King to align himself with B.B. King, then a rising star of blues guitar. </p> <p>His earliest records are credited to “Freddy,” but by 1968 he changed the spelling to “Freddie.” His recording career began in 1956, and by 1960 he had recorded the soon-to-be hit songs “Have You Ever Loved a Woman?,” “Love Her with a Feeling” and the instrumental smash "Hideaway," covered brilliantly by Eric Clapton with John Mayall on the <em>Blues Breakers</em> album, recorded in 1966. </p> <p>Early photos of King show him playing a mid-Fifties Gibson gold-top Les Paul with P-90 pickups, which he used along with a Gibson GA-40 amplifier. Shortly thereafter, he switched to his trademark Gibson ES-345 guitars, cranked to massive volume through Fender Quad Reverbs. </p> <p>He picked with his fingers, using a plastic thumb pick along with a metal index-finger pick, and his string gauges were very unusual: the top three string gauges were .010, .011 and .012—very light for the B and especially the G—while the wound strings were normal light-medium-gauge electric strings.</p> <p>King scored many early instrumental hits, the biggest being the aforementioned “Hideaway,” an easy-grooving 12-bar shuffle in E with a distinct, memorable melody. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a similar melody played within the 12-bar form. </p> <p>As melodic lines are played on the top two strings with abundant use of open notes—akin to the country blues of Lightnin’ Hopkins—a rhythm part is equally attended to, built from palm-muted two-note forms on the bottom two strings and balanced against the melodic development.</p> <p>In bar 2 of the example, a simple open- to-second-fret hammer-on is replaced with a “rolling” hammer-on, wherein the middle finger is hammered onto the first fret, instead of the second, followed by a slide up to the second fret. (This more intricate technique was later adopted and employed frequently by Stevie Ray Vaughan.) </p> <p>Throughout this example, notice the subtle inclusion of single-note phrases that serve to connect the elements of the part while keeping it moving forward.</p> <p>Freddie revisited this melody for another of his classic instrumentals, “The Stumble.” <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates a similar form, which begins with a melodic line close to that of “Hideaway” but is played over a different chord progression, starting on the IV(four) chord, A, in the key of E. </p> <p>In this 16-bar form, a descending sliding double-stop lick, based on a sixth interval, is played on the G and high E strings, executed by picking the G string with the thumb and the high E string with either the index or middle finger. Pick each pair sharply and in a staccato manner (short and detached), and strive for absolute accuracy as you move quickly down the fretboard.</p> <p>Freddie showcased a similar lick in “Hideaway,” with a band “breakdown” (the band lays out from playing the groove, supplying accented chordal stabs only). <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> offers a lick along these lines, initiated with a very cool and unusual E7add2 chord voicing. The band comes back in at bar 5, over A, and, in this example, further melodic development is performed on the top two strings.</p> <p>A great example of King’s relentlessly hard-driving style is a song called “Boogie Funk,” essentially a one-chord vamp played in A. The roots of this song can be found in the John Lee Hooker classic, “Boogie Chillen.”</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 4</strong> presents a repeating riff, built around an A5 chord, that features muted- string accents along with subtle half-step bends on the low E and A strings. This is played with a “triplet feel,” so what is written as eighth notes is intended to be played as a quarter-note/eighth-note combo within a triplet bracket. I use a pick to play this part, alternating evenly between downstrokes and upstrokes, but Freddie would fingerpick such a part, so try using the thumb for the downstrokes and the index or middle finger (or both) for the upstrokes. In <strong>FIGURE 5</strong>, I add a melodic figure to the form.</p> <p>After building intensity by riding on the I (one) chord, Freddie would switch briefly to the IV (four) chord and play a similar rhythmic lick. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> offers a part along these lines, to be performed with the pick hand in the same manner as <strong>FIGURES 4</strong> and <strong>5</strong>.</p> <p>These examples just scratch the surface of Freddie King’s genius, so dig deep into his catalog to discover even more for yourself.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience1699133089001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="1699133089001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.35.41%20AM.png" width="620" height="442" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.35.41 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.36.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="584" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.36.04 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.37.10%20AM.png" width="620" height="589" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.37.10 AM.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20shot%202015-07-13%20at%2011.38.06%20AM.png" width="620" height="461" alt="Screen shot 2015-07-13 at 11.38.06 AM.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/freddie-king">Freddie King</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/freddie-king-lesson-texas-blues-video-tab-andy-aledort-in-deep#comments August 2012 blues Freddie King In Deep 2012 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Mon, 13 Jul 2015 16:49:06 +0000 Andy Aledort 16113 at http://www.guitarworld.com Guitar World DVD: Go 'In Deep' with Stevie Ray Vaughan http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-world-dvd-go-deep-stevie-ray-vaughan <!--paging_filter--><p>One of the most important electric blues artists of the 20th century, Stevie Ray Vaughan revived blues rock and influenced guitarists across many genres with his fiery, soulful playing. A new instructional DVD from <em>Guitar World</em>, <em>In Deep with Stevie Ray Vaughan</em>, will teach you everything you need to master his techniques and unlock the secrets of his indelible style. You'll learn how to play in SRV's style using licks, patterns and tricks that will transform your blues playing overnight! <em>In Deep with Stevie Ray Vaughan</em> features more than 60 minutes of instruction! <strong>Highlights include:</strong> • Essential Licks &amp; Phrases • Uptempo &amp; Slow Blues • Mastering the "Stevie Shuffle" • Great SRV Turnarounds • Phrasing, Bending &amp; Chords Your instructor is Andy Aledort, a longtime contributor to <em>Guitar World</em> magazine and the author and producer of literally hundreds of artist transcriptions, books and instructional DVDs, Andy has influenced and inspired guitarists around the world for decades. <strong>Note: This product includes a PDF booklet on the DVD and can be retrieved by opening the DVD on your computer.</strong> <strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/in-deep-with-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=InDeepSRV">This DVD is available now at the Guitar World Online Store for $14.99.</a></strong></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/stevie-ray-vaughan">Stevie Ray Vaughan</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/guitar-world-dvd-go-deep-stevie-ray-vaughan#comments Stevie Ray Vaughan In Deep with Andy Aledort News Features Fri, 17 Apr 2015 15:39:43 +0000 Guitar World Staff 24311 at http://www.guitarworld.com Inventing the Steel: How to Solo Like Angus Young, Jimmy Page and Tony Iommi http://www.guitarworld.com/inventing-steel-how-solo-angus-young-jimmy-page-and-tony-iommi <!--paging_filter--><p>Regarded by many as the three most vital purveyors of pure hard rock/heavy metal sonic evil, AC/DC’s <strong>Angus Young</strong>, Led Zeppelin’s <strong>Jimmy Page</strong> and Black Sabbath’s <strong>Tony Iommi</strong> have each forged a distinct, instantly recognizable guitar style and sound. </p> <p>After decades of dedicated service, all three players continue to influence countless up-and-coming metalheads the world over, and an in-depth study of each guitarist’s distinct musical personality is mandatory for any aspiring hard rock player.</p> <p>Young, Page and Iommi share a few similarities in their respective crafts. </p> <p>All three have relied on Gibson solidbody/dual-humbucker-style guitars for the majority of their careers, inspiring signature models of their respective axes: Angus Young has favored Gibson SG-type guitars and has his own Gibson signature model; Jimmy Page is most closely associated with the 1959 sunburst Les Paul, replicated in limited quantity by Gibson (with a retail price of more than $20,000); and Tony Iommi’s long association with the ’61 SG led to the creation of the similarly designed Gibson Tony Iommi model (as well as the custom-made SG-type Patrick Eggle and JayDee models that Iommi also uses). When soloing, all three guitarists most often use the bridge pickup. </p> <p>Armed with their respective axes, the three defined the sound of metal in the late Sixties and early Seventies by relying on specific amplification: Jimmy Page favors Marshall SLP-1959 100-watt amps modified with KT-88 tubes, while also employing Voxes, Hiwatts, Fender Super Reverbs and Orange amps. </p> <p>Angus Young has generally used Marshall 100-watt “Plexi” models along with JTM-45 “Plexis.” Iommi is also known for his use of Marshall and Orange gear and has long been a fan of Laney amplification; he even has his own Laney 100-watt signature amplifier.</p> <p>Another commonality among the three guitar gods is their choice of scale for soloing. In the spirit of their American blues guitar heroes, all three rely most heavily on the minor pentatonic scale. <strong>FIGURE 1a</strong> shows the A minor pentatonic scale (A C D E G) played in fifth position; <strong>FIGURE 1b</strong> shows the same scale as played in an extended pattern that traverses the neck from the third fret to the 12th. The root notes are circled in each figure; once you have become familiar with these fingering patterns, be sure to move them to all other keys.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1_5.png" width="620" height="113" alt="1_5.png" /></p> <p>Let’s now look at these two patterns one octave and 12 frets higher: <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong> depicts A minor pentatonic played in 17th position while <strong>FIGURE 2b</strong> shows an extended pattern that spans the 15th–22nd frets, ending with a whole step bend from D to E. Young, Page and Iommi all cover the highest reaches of the neck in many of their solos, so be sure to practice the minor pentatonic scales in every key and all over the fretboard.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/2_3.png" width="620" height="120" alt="2_3.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">Angus Young</span></p> <p>With his comedic school-boy outfit and hyperenergetic stage antics, Angus Young has been both celebrated and reviled for his over-the-top persona. But in truth, he is simply one of the greatest rock soloists ever. His intense, exciting playing style is equal parts adrenaline, blues rock fire, and precision, all of it spiked with a crash-and-burn attitude. In other words, it’s hard rock at its absolute best.</p> <p>One of Young’s greatest solos is the one he recorded in the AC/DC classic, “You Shook Me All Night Long” (<em>Back in Black</em>). <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> presents a solo played in this style: it’s played over a repeating I-IV-V-IV chord progression in the key of G—G-C-D-C—and is based primarily on the G minor pentatonic scale (G Bf C D F); bars 1–4 are played in third position, and then the next phrase shifts one octave higher to 15th position in bars 5–8. </p> <p>The figure begins with a whole-step bend from C to D on the G string that is sustained and played with vibrato for three beats. Use your ring finger to fret the note and both your ring and middle fingers to push the string, with the middle finger one fret behind the ring finger. This two-finger bending technique is known as reinforced fingering and is used extensively by Young as well as Page and Iommi. </p> <p>The first note in <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is a prime example of Young’s signature bend vibrato: upon bending the string with the ring and middle fingers (the index finger may also be used to help push the string for additional strength and support), the bend is then repeatedly released partially—somewhere between a quarter step and a half step—and restored to a whole step (“full”) in quick, even rhythm. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/3_1.png" width="620" height="259" alt="3_1.png" /></p> <p>When executing this type of bend vibrato, you’ll find that it helps to push your fret-hand thumb against the top side of the neck, as this provides leverage for the fingers that are pushing and releasing the string. Young’s vibrato is relatively fast and not very wide and will require practice and keen listening to emulate authentically.</p> <p>The C-to-D bend is followed with an index-finger barre across the top two strings at the third fret, and in bar 2 the pinkie frets F (second string/sixth fret), followed by the same reinforced ring-finger bend and release on C (third string/fifth fret). At the end of bar 2, after fretting the G note, roll the tip of the ring finger from the fourth string over to the fifth string and then back. This “finger roll” may take some practice to get used to, but it’s a very useful technique that is worth learning. </p> <p>What makes a solo like this great is its simplicity and melodic quality. Each idea is balanced against the next in an effortless way, and the overall result is a memorable solo that one could easily sing—an earmark of every great hard rock guitar solo. </p> <p>Beginning in bar 5 of <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, the second half of the solo relates to the first half in that it also leads off with a sustained bend, this time from a high F, the flatted seventh, to G, the root note, which is played vibrato in a similar manner. When playing minor pentatonic licks like these in high positions, many blues, blues/rock and hard rock players adopt a three-finger approach—index-middle-ring—for the majority of their licks, presumably because of the closeness of the frets. Young, however, chooses to use his pinkie in many of his licks, regardless of his fretboard position. </p> <p>I wrap the solo up in bar 8 by switching to a riff based on G major pentatonic (G A B D E). A staple of blues soloing is to alternate between the “sweet” sound of major pentatonic and the darker sound of minor pentatonic, and Young does just this in many of his solos. </p> <p>Another great example of Young’s masterful soloing can be heard on the title track to <em>Back in Black</em>. <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> shows a solo played in a similar style. This example is played over a simple repeating chord progression in the key of E: E-D-A (I-fVII-IV). The majority of the solo is based on the E minor pentatonic scale (E G A B D), although I begin with a phrase that incorporates notes from the E Dorian mode (E Fs G A B Cs D) by including the sixth, Cs. The placement of this pitch is critical in relation to the accompanying chord progression, as it lands on the A chord, and Cs is the major third of A. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/4.png" width="620" height="366" alt="4.png" /></p> <p>Like <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>, the goal with this example is to illustrate Young’s clear sense of melody and melodic development: <strong>FIGURE 4</strong> begins with a “hooky” phrase that is developed by descending the G string in a similar manner across the first two bars. At bar 3, I jump up to the 12th-position E minor pentatonic “box” pattern, beginning with a high D-to-E bend and vibrato that is sustained through the first two beats of the bar, followed by a fast phrase based on descending 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>The solo then stays rooted in 12th position through the remainder of bar 3, all the way to the end of bar 7. As with the high-position pentatonic licks in the previous example, the majority of these licks may be played comfortably with three fingers. </p> <p>Particularly noteworthy is the classic lightning-fast blues/rock/metal run that spans bar 7 of <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>: based entirely on descending 16th-note triplets, the run begins with a pull-off from a high G (first string/15th fret) to E (12th fret) followed by D (second string/15th fret). The next 16th-note triplet starts one note lower, on E, and is followed by a pull-off from D to B (15th fret to12th fret). The pattern of starting one note lower with each subsequent 16th-note triplet and using pull-offs wherever possible is repeated throughout the run. </p> <p>As the solo develops, analyze each beat and notice how the progression of the lines contributes to the overall phrase. Young is a master of “phrase-ology,” a skill/gift that lends an almost effortless quality to his solos and the feeling of constantly pushing the music forward and telling a story. </p> <hr /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">JIMMY PAGE</span> <p>Jimmy Page was inspired by many of the same American blues guitar heroes as his British blues/rock contemporaries Eric Clapton, Jeff Beck and Peter Green. These heroes include the three Kings—Albert, B.B. and Freddie—as well as T-Bone Walker, Buddy Guy and Otis Rush. </p> <p>Page was also equally influenced by the fiery intensity of rockabilly guitarists Cliff Gallup (Gene Vincent and the Blue Caps) and Scotty Moore (Elvis Presley), as well as the futuristic daring of Les Paul. A student of many different styles of guitar playing, Page always combines in his solos a well-balanced structure and sense of melodic development with true depth of feeling. His progressive approach to soloing has pushed the nature of blues/rock guitar to previously unimagined territory. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 5</strong> is an eight-bar solo representative of Page’s improvisation style. It’s played in the key of A minor over a repeating Am-G-F (i-fVII-fVI) chord progression. The majority of the solo is based on A minor pentatonic (A C D E G), beginning in fifth position with a D-to-E bend on the G string. This note is bent and shaken using the same reinforced fingering and thumb leveraging techniques described earlier in reference to <strong>FIGURE 3</strong>.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/5_0.png" width="620" height="351" alt="5_0.png" /></p> <p>This initial bend is followed by a stream of cascading 16th notes played across the next four beats on the top three strings, with notes quickly alternating between either the fifth and seventh frets or the fifth and eighth frets. Through the majority of this solo, a balance of eighth and 16th notes is achieved, giving the solo a forward-leaning quality as each phrase flows seamlessly into the next. </p> <p>Over an F chord in bars 2, 4, 6 and 8, I occasionally incorporate an F note into the A minor pentatonic-derived lines in order to clearly relate the solo line to the backing chord progression; this approach is a Page trademark. Adding this one note also serves to broaden the solo beyond the strict blues territory while also strengthening the melodic quality of the licks. </p> <p>Bar 5 begins with a descending run wherein a stream of 16th notes are phrased in two six-note groups that form an interesting melodic contour. A similar phrasing approach is used in bar 6 with successive four-note descending groups. The solo develops interestingly and builds to a climax in bars 7 and 8 with a repeated melodic “shape” that ascends the A minor pentatonic scale in seven-note phrases, starting from either the root note or the fifth each time. </p> <p>While this may sound overly analyzed, in truth it is the application of these melodic phrasing techniques that gives the solo its clear sense of structure, which is a hallmark of all of Page’s best lead work.</p> <hr /> <span style="font-size:18px;font-weight:bold;">TONY IOMMI</span> <p>As the progenitor of the heaviest of heavy metal, Tony Iommi set high standards for the writing of demonic-sounding riffs while he simultaneously created the template for the heavy metal soloing of future generations.</p> <p>As a teenager, Iommi, a left-handed player, was the victim of an unfortunate accident in which he lost the tips of his right hand’s middle and ring fingers while working in a sheet metal factory. Discouraged but not defeated, the resourceful guitarist devised plastic covers made from bottle caps to wear over those fingertips. </p> <p>In later years, he would wear custom–fitted leather finger protectors. Iommi also switched to using super light-gauge strings: .008, .008, .011, .018w, .024 and .032, which are much easier to fret and bend than a standard set of .009s or 010s. </p> <p>In its earliest days, Black Sabbath tuned to concert pitch, but soon after Iommi began tuning his strings down one half step (low to high: Ef Af Df Gf Bf Ef) and subsequently tuned down even further by one and a half steps (low to high: Cs Fs B E Gs Cs), all the while continuing to use very light strings. </p> <p>A signature element in the characteristically dark vibe of Iommi’s solos is the incorporation of minor modes. In his outro solo for “War Pigs” (<em>Paranoid</em>), Iommi utilizes the E Aeolian mode (E Fs G A B C D) along with E minor pentatonic (E G A B D). <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a solo played with a similar approach. </p> <p>Within the key of E minor, the chord progression simply alternates between Em and D, and in his solo, Iommi’s ties his licks squarely to the chord progression with the use of chord tones that relate to each specific chord. Bars 1–4 of <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> demonstrate this approach by favoring the notes E and G, the root note and minor third, respectively, over Em, and the notes D and Fs, the root and major third, respectively, over D. The additional notes and overall phrasing serve to fill in the space and effectively set up the incorporation of these shifting chord tones (also known as guide tones). </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/6_0.png" width="620" height="339" alt="6_0.png" /></p> <p>Another key aspect of Iommi’s soloing style that <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> demonstrates is the intensity of both the pick attack and vibrato. Iommi’s playing is well-loved for its aggressive power, so lean into the lines with both hands, and listen closely to his recorded works to get a clear picture of and feel for his playing style. </p> <p>Beginning on beat two of bar 5, I repeatedly bend E, third string/ninth fret, up one and one half steps (the equivalent of three frets) to G. When performing “overbends” like this, it’s even more important to harness the strength of at least two fingers, the ring and middle, if not three (the ring, middle and index). This is followed in bar 6 by fast whole-step bends that alternate with hammer-on/pull-of combinations between the seventh and ninth frets on the G string. This is a challenging lick that will take a bit of slow practice to master.</p> <p>In the second half of bar 7, I borrow a signature phrasing technique of Iommi’s, with a 16th-note run that descends the E Aeolian mode in three-note groups on a single string, using pull-offs and finger slides. This type of line serves to add both rhythmic and melodic interest to a pentatonic- or mode-based solo.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers another example of soloing in Iommi’s style, this time incorporating the detuning of one and one half steps. (All notes and chords sound in the key of C# minor, one and one half steps lower than written.) This example demonstrates Iommi’s penchant for using fast hammer-ons and pull-offs within repeated short phrases, as he does on his solo in “Supernaut” (Vol. 4).</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/7_0.png" width="620" height="365" alt="7_0.png" /></p> <p>The solo is based entirely on the E minor pentatonic scale, played in 12th position, and begins with a repeated phrase that starts with a quick hammer/pull on the first string from the 12th fret to the 15th, followed by D, second string/15th fret. This sequence is played four times through bar 1, and bar 2 consists entirely of trills in 12th position. (A trill is executed by quickly alternating between two notes, usually using hammer-ons and pull-offs in combination.) </p> <p>Bars 3 and 4 are similar in that both feature fast phrases based on 16th-note triplets; in bar 3, note bursts are performed with hammer/pulls on the D string, and in bar 4 the hammers occur on the G string. Bars 5 and 6 offer an example of the “threes on fours” concept—16th notes phrased in groups of three—and bars 7 and 8 wrap up the solo with fast hammer/pulls, played in 16th-nopte triplets, that traverse the strings, moving from high to low. </p> <p>In all of their solos, Young, Page and Iommi combine well-structured melodic ideas, solid execution and spirited performance—essential factors in any great, memorable guitar solo that you should strive to achieve in your own solos.</p> <p><em>Painting: Tim O'Brien</em></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/tony-iommi">Tony Iommi</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/jimmy-page">Jimmy Page</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/acdc">AC/DC</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/led-zeppelin">Led Zeppelin</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/inventing-steel-how-solo-angus-young-jimmy-page-and-tony-iommi#comments Angus Young Articles GW Archive JamPlay Jimmy Page May 2007 Tim O'Brien Tony Iommi In Deep with Andy Aledort News Features Lessons Magazine Tue, 31 Mar 2015 14:23:56 +0000 Andy Aledort 19211 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know" Video Lesson http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know-video-lesson <!--paging_filter--><p>Randy Rhoads, one of rock’s most brilliant and original guitarists, made his name on the strength of his spectacular playing on Ozzy Osbourne’s first solo efforts, <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em> and <em>Diary of a Madman.</em></p> <p>In this edition of In Deep, we’ll take a look at the live version of the Ozzy/Randy classic “I Don’t Know,” included with the 30th anniversary remaster of <em>Blizzard</em>. </p> <p> Let’s begin with a quick rundown of Randy’s gear. On <em>Blizzard of Ozz</em>, Randy tuned his guitar to concert pitch (A=440) and used a standard .009–.042 string set. </p> <p>For <em>Diary</em>, he tuned down one half step and switched to a set of .010–.046 strings. His main guitars during his time with Ozzy were his 1970 white Les Paul Custom, his custom-made Karl Sandoval polka-dot Flying V and his custom-made Jackson Flying V guitars: one black, and one white, which he christened the Concorde.</p> <p> Randy’s primary amplifiers were Marshall model 1959 100-watt heads, most likely early Seventies versions with metal fronts, and he used a variety of MXR effect pedals, such as the Distortion +, Stereo Chorus, Flanger and 10-Band Graphic Equalizer, along with a Vox Cry Baby wah.</p> <p> For the live version of “I Don’t Know,” Randy added a subtle twist to the song’s intro. As shown in <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, after sliding down from the 17th-fret A root note on the sixth string, he plays a sequence of power chords—A5, B5/A and C5/A—against a palm-muted open A-string pedal tone, followed by G5-D5 and then a restatement of the opening theme. </p> <p>In bar 8, he performs a series of pull-offs across all the strings except for the high E. For the first three C-B pull-offs on the B string, use a hard pick attack and your thumb graze the string to create the squealing “pinch harmonics” (P.H.), as Randy does. </p> <p>On the studio version of the song, Randy played a simpler version of this pull-off lick, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 2a</strong>. In every version of “I Don’t Know,” Randy played something slightly different in this spot, which comes right before the verse vocal enters. Another signature variation is to play fast pull-offs on the G string from different fretted notes, as Randy often did at the end of the first chorus. An example of this is shown in <strong>FIGURE 2b.</strong></p> <p> The primary riff appears many times throughout the song, and Randy always spun variations on it, such as adding artificial and natural harmonics in different spots. <strong>FIGURE 3a</strong> includes a pinch harmonic on A in bar 1 and natural harmonics (N.H.) over both the G and D chords in bar 4. A natural harmonic is sounded by lightly laying a fret-hand finger directly above a specific fret as you pick the string. <strong>FIGURE 3b</strong> offers a string-bending variation that Randy would use across bars 3 and 4 of the riff. </p> <p> Another great variation is the “neck-bending” trick shown in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. After sounding a natural harmonic at the G string’s fifth fret, secure the body of the guitar while pushing against the back of the headstock, which will cause the note to drop in pitch. </p> <p>Exercise caution, however—Slash once cracked the neck on his favorite Les Paul by pushing just a little too hard. Randy’s adventurous nature inspired him to creatively interpret each section of the song, as he often did during the pre-chorus as well. <strong>FIGURE 5</strong> illustrates his approach to the first pre-chorus on the new live version. Notice the ways in which he approaches the figures over F/G in bars 2, 4 and 6.</p> <p> The bridge of “I Don’t Know” shifts to half time, and here Randy arpeggiates most of the chords in the progression by picking each note individually in succession and allowing them to sustain. See <strong>FIGURE 6</strong>. Randy’s live guitar solo includes a few subtle differences from the one he plays in the studio version. </p> <p>The first four bars, based on the G blues scale (G Bb C C# D F) in 15th position, are shown in <strong>FIGURE 7. FIGURE 8</strong> illustrates the next four bars, wherein Randy bends the B string while tapping onto the fretboard three frets higher with the edge of the pick, then trills between the open G string and Bf at the third fret while pushing on the string behind the nut, raising the pitch.</p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 9</strong> shows the end of the solo, with bars 1 and 2 based on a melodic “shape” that chromatically descends the fretboard, moving into a classic G blues scale/Aeolian (G A Bb C D Eb F) lick in bar 3.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937170092001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937170092001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/01_2.png" width="620" height="630" alt="01_2.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/02_1.png" width="620" height="387" alt="02_1.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/03_1.png" width="620" height="621" alt="03_1.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/04_1.png" width="620" height="537" alt="04_1.png" /></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figures 2-4</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937161726001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937161726001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figures 5-6</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937157263001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937157263001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figure 7</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937161682001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937161682001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figure 8</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937157219001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937157219001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <hr /> <p><em>This video is bonus content related to the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For full print reviews, lesson tabs and more, look for the July 2011 issue of </em>Guitar World<em> on newsstands now!</em><br /> In this series of videos, <em>Guitar World</em>'s Andy Aledort will break down everything you need to know to play the newly released live version of Ozzy Osbourne's "I Don't Know," featuring the otherworldly guitar playing of the late Randy Rhoads. The full transcription of the song, along with detailed notes can be found in the July 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>. <strong>Figure 9</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"></div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><p><script src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js" type="text/javascript"></script><object id="myExperience937161639001" class="BrightcoveExperience"><param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="937161639001" /></object></p> <!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><p><script type="text/javascript">// <![CDATA[ brightcove.createExperiences(); // ]]></![cdata[></script></p> <!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><strong>Lesson Contents</strong> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know">Figure 1</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,1">Figures 2-4</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,2">Figures 5-6</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,3">Figure 7</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,4">Figure 8</a> <a href="http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know?page=0,5">Figure 9</a></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/randy-rhoads">Randy Rhoads</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/ozzy-osbourne">Ozzy Osbourne</a> </div> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-ozzy-osbournes-i-dont-know-video-lesson#comments 2011 Andy Aledort July 2011 Ozzy Osbourne Randy Rhoads Videos July In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 19 Mar 2015 15:19:50 +0000 Andy Aledort 10970 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Slidedog — the Slide Guitar Mastery of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-slidedog-slide-guitar-mastery-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, we examined the guitar genius of the great Duane Allman, who, as founder of the Allman Brothers Band, rose to prominence as one of the greatest and universally heralded blues-rock guitarists of all time. </p> <p>In honor of the expansive new box set from Rounder Records, <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>, we focused on his single-note soloing on classic Allman Brothers’ cuts like “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post.” This month’s column is dedicated to Duane’s mastery of the art of slide guitar.</p> <p>Duane possessed an instantly recognizable sound on electric slide, earmarked by masterful phrasing and smooth, “singing” vibrato.</p> <p>Great examples of his slide guitar prowess include “Trouble No More” and “Dreams” from the band’s debut release, <em>The Allman Brothers Band</em>; “Don’t Keep Me Wonderin’,” from <em>Idlewild South</em>; “Statesboro Blues” and “Done Somebody Wrong” from <em>At Fillmore East</em>; and “One Way Out” from <em>Eat a Peach</em>. </p> <p>He also lent inspired slide work to the title track and many others on the Derek and the Dominoes album <em>Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs</em>.</p> <p> Incredibly, Duane had been playing slide guitar for only about a year at the time of the band’s debut release. He recalled, “I heard Ry Cooder playing slide on Taj Mahal’s debut album, and I said, ‘Man, that’s for me.’ ” Brother Gregg Allman concurs. “He just picked it up and started burnin’. He was a natural.”</p> <p> For slide playing, Duane wore a small glass Coricidin bottle (Coricidin was a cold medication) on his ring finger. He usually played slide in open tunings, most often open E (low to high, E B E G# B E) and occasionally open A (E A E A C# E). He also played slide in standard tuning on songs such as “Dreams” and “Mountain Jam.” </p> <p>In the early days, Duane would retune his gold-top Gibson Les Paul between songs in order to play slide. Later, co-guitarist Dickey Betts gave Duane a two-pickup 1961 Gibson SG/Les Paul Standard that was used solely for slide playing. The design of the SG, with its double-cutaway body, is well suited to slide work, allowing easy access to the upper regions of the fretboard.</p> <p> Duane chose to wear the SG high on his body to facilitate navigating the board overall. The musical examples in this column focus on the use of open E tuning for slide. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates how to tune to open E: the sixth, second and first strings are tuned normally (E, B and E); the fifth and fourth strings are tuned one whole step higher (A to B and D to E); and the third string is tuned one half step higher (G to G#). The resulting tuning is, low to high, E B E G# B E. Strumming across all of the open strings sounds an E major chord.</p> <p>The same is true when barring or placing the slide across all of the strings at the 12th fret. Likewise, barring a finger or placing the slide across all of the strings at any given fret will form a major chord, as shown in <strong>FIGURE 2.</strong> A great majority of slide licks in open E tuning are formed by moving back and forth between a two-fret span of the fretboard.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates one such pattern, which forms an E hybrid scale, one that combines elements of E minor pentatonic (E G A B D) and E major pentatonic (E F# G# B C#). Two notes are sounded on each string at either the 10th or 12th fret, and three notes are sounded on<br /> the fifth string with the inclusion of Gs, at the ninth fret. </p> <p>Practice this pattern by first fretting normally, and then play it using the slide. Some basic rules for slide playing: For proper intonation, you’ll want to, in most cases, position the slide directly over and parallel to the fret wire. Apply only enough pressure against the string to sound a note clearly; do not allow the slide to “bang” into the frets. Also, lightly lay unused fret-hand fingers across the strings behind the slide to help suppress unwanted overtones and ghost notes.</p> <p> When playing slide, Duane fingerpicked exclusively, using his thumb, index and middle fingers to pick the strings. A major element in the uniqueness of his sound was his pick-hand muting techniques: while one finger picked a string, the other two were used for muting. </p> <p>For example, when he picked a string with his thumb, his index and middle fingers would rest lightly on the higher strings, muting them; when he picked a string with his index finger, his thumb would mute the lower strings; and when he picked with his middle finger, he would mute the string with his thumb and index fingers. This technique afforded Duane’s slide playing unparalleled clarity and precision. An essential slide exercise involves sliding back and forth between notes of the E hybrid scale, with careful attention paid to playing “in tune.” </p> <p> <strong>FIGURES 4 and 5</strong> offer two different ways one can practice sliding to and from each note in this position. One of the most common vehicles for slide soloing in blues and rock is the 12-bar blues shuffle. <strong>FIGURE 6</strong> illustrates a basic shuffle rhythm part played in the key of E using open E tuning. Use only conventional fretting (no slide) to perform this part. <strong>FIGURE 7</strong> offers an example of how to play a slide solo over this rhythm part: repeatedly moving the slide back and forth (higher and lower) on the fretboard creates the sound of a slide vibrato. </p> <p>The “width” of this movement, as well as the speed, is every player’s choice; strive to keep the center of the vibrato movement over the fret for proper intonation. The aforementioned “Statesboro Blues” and “One Way Out” are celebrated slide guitar masterpieces. <strong>FIGURE 8</strong> illustrates a “Statesboro Blues”-like solo, and <strong>FIGURE 9</strong> offers a solo in the style of “One Way Out.”</p> <p>Work through each example carefully, and for inspiration, listen to the recordings and pay strict attention to every detail in Duane’s articulation.</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/yJjV1-7ZMd4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2011.59.04%20AM.png" width="620" height="669" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 11.59.04 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2011.59.51%20AM.png" width="620" height="340" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 11.59.51 AM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2012.00.12%20PM.png" width="620" height="435" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 12.00.12 PM.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/Screen%20Shot%202014-11-20%20at%2012.00.35%20PM.png" width="620" height="670" alt="Screen Shot 2014-11-20 at 12.00.35 PM.png" /><br /> <br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2294181381001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2294181381001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/allman-brothers-band">Allman Brothers Band</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-slidedog-slide-guitar-mastery-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep June 2013 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 12 Mar 2015 15:07:28 +0000 Andy Aledort 18241 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep: Breaking Down the Signature Elements of Gary Moore's Immediately Identifiable Guitar Style http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-gary-moore <!--paging_filter--><p>In this edition of In Deep, we’ll examine some of the signature elements of the brilliant blues-rock guitarist Gary Moore’s stunning, immediately identifiable guitar style.</p> <p>Born in 1952, in Belfast, Northern Ireland, Moore picked up the guitar at the age of eight, inspired by the music of Elvis Presley, the Shadows and the Beatles. </p> <p>But his strongest influences were John Mayall’s Bluesbreakers guitarists Eric Clapton and Peter Green, as well as legendary electric blues progenitors Albert King, B.B King and Albert Collins. Another important influence was Jimi Hendrix; Moore would regularly include Hendrix’s slow blues “Red House” in his live shows. </p> <p>Though Moore was often seen playing a beautiful Fiesta Red 1961 Strat, his signature sound is more closely associated with the beloved 1959 Les Paul Standard that he played for many years (see sidebar on page 36). He purchased that guitar from Peter Green in 1970 and, fittingly, used it to record his 1995 tribute to his mentor, <em>Blues for Greeny.</em> </p> <p>Often, Moore would begin a song using the warm tone of his Les Paul’s neck pickup, with which he would perform melodic, vocal-like lines, then switch over to the bridge pickup for his solos to achieve a more aggressive and biting sound. </p> <p>Moore often employed a fair amount of gain—courtesy of Marshall heads (often JTM45s), 4x12 basketweave Marshall cabinets and Marshall Guv’nor and Ibanez Tube Screamer pedals—and was known for conjuring tremendous sustain, such as the celebrated “endless note” featured in his live performances of his classic song “Parisienne Walkways.” </p> <p>A great way to approach incorporating Gary Moore–style licks into your playing is to start with the most essential scale for blues/rock soloing, the minor pentatonic. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> shows the A minor pentatonic scale in fifth position.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_1.jpg" /></p> <p>The fingering I use for this scale is index-pinkie on the low E string, switching to index-ring finger for the rest of the scale. One of the unusual things about Moore’s style is that he preferred to use his middle finger in conjunction with his index for a great many of his licks, similar to the fretting approach of Gypsy jazz great Django Reinhardt. When playing this type of scale in this position, Moore would often use his index and ring fingers on the top two strings and the low E string but would switch to index-middle for all the other strings.</p> <p><iframe width="620" height="365" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/pWCZSVkGn8g" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe><br /> <br /><br /> Occasionally, Moore would stick with the index-middle approach across virtually all of the strings, along the lines of <strong>FIGURE 2</strong>. In this lick, I start by barring the index finger across the top two strings at the fifth fret and use the middle finger to execute the quick half-step bends on the B string, as well as the fast hammer-ons and pull-offs across the B and G strings.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_3.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_4.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURE 3</strong> details a “traditional” fingering for descending the minor pentatonic scale in this position within groups of 16th-note triplets. </p> <p>A staple of Moore’s soloing style was to unleash fast flourishes of notes, executed with free-form “crammed” phrasing that rushed over the top of the groove. He would balance these fiery blasts with simpler, more vocal-like phrases that would effectively pull his improvisations back into the groove. For many of these runs, Moore would rely on quick hammer-on/pull-off figures between pairs of notes on a given string, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURES 4a and 4b. </strong></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_5.jpg" /></p> <p>In FIGURE 5a, I apply this concept to every string as I descend A minor pentatonic in a symmetrical fashion. FIGURE 5b offers a similar, albeit simpler, idea, and FIGURE 5c presents a similar approach applied to an ascending lick.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_6.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_6c.jpg" /></p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_7.jpg" /></p> <p>Further permutations on this concept are shown in <strong>FIGURES 6a–c</strong>. Once you’ve got a handle on these, try moving to other areas of the fretboard and apply the concepts to other keys, as demonstrated in <strong>FIGURES 7a and 7b</strong>.</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_8.jpg" /></p> <p><strong>FIGURE 8</strong> offers an example of soloing in Gary’s style over a medium straight-eighths funk groove along the lines of his cover of Albert King’s “Oh, Pretty Woman.’</p> <p><img src="http://dl.guitarworld.com/tabs/indeep0511_9.jpg" /></p> <p>The title track of Moore’s hit album <em>Still Got the Blues</em> (a complete transcription of which appears in the May 2011 issue of <em>Guitar World</em>) featured a “cycle of fourths” chord progression more common to jazz than blues or rock. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 9</strong> is a melodic solo played over this type of progression in the key of Am. Notice that each phrase makes direct reference to the accompanying chord by targeting its third. Also, bar 6 features a fast pull-off lick to the open high E string, a technique Moore utilized in a great many of his solos.</p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-gary-moore#comments 2011 Andy Aledort Gary Moore In Deep May 2011 Thin Lizzy In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Fri, 06 Feb 2015 16:04:38 +0000 Andy Aledort 17397 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep: Tribute to the Musical Genius and Signature Lead Guitar Style of Duane Allman http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman <!--paging_filter--><p>A true original, the late, great virtuoso guitarist Duane Allman led the Allman Brothers Band into rock history with his ferocious, deeply expressive and trailblazing guitar work. </p> <p>Rounder Records offers ample testimony to the beauty as well as the breadth of Duane’s recorded work in the new, beautifully compiled box set <em>Skydog: The Duane Allman Retrospective</em>. In this edition of In Deep, we will examine some of the key elements of Duane’s signature style as a lead guitarist. </p> <p>One of the best examples of the genius of Duane Allman can be found on the timeless, classic live album, At Fillmore East (1971), which captures the Allman Brothers Band live in concert at the peak of their powers. </p> <p>Duane’s razor-sharp articulation and masterful touch abound, starting with the slide guitar tour de force “Statesboro Blues,” through the smoldering slow blues “Stormy Monday” and continuing through the fiery, aggressive solos performed on “Whipping Post,” “You Don’t Love Me” and other great tracks.</p> <p>Duane’s rich, warm tone was achieved via his main ax, a 1958 tobacco sunburst Gibson Les Paul Standard, played through Marshall<br /> “Plexi” 50- and 100-watt heads, usually running two 4x12 Marshall bottoms. For additional distortion, he very occasionally used a Dallas-Arbiter Fuzz Face, usually in the studio. </p> <p>A key to Duane’s virtuosity was the fact that, like Jimi Hendrix, he had extensive experience as a session guitarist, working closely alongside R&amp;B greats like Wilson Pickett, Aretha Franklin and King Curtis. Through his studio work, Duane had developed a great sense of rhythm as well as a keen understanding of economy, in terms of phrasing.</p> <p>This understanding resulted in improvised solos that remained cohesive and conversational no matter how long they stretched out or how far they roamed from the original starting point. For this column, let’s use two of Duane’s signature songs, “Stormy Monday” and “Whipping Post,” as our points of focus.</p> <p>“Stormy Monday,” written and originally recorded by blues great T-Bone Walker, is played in the key of G. For soloing, Duane relied primarily on a few standard “bluesapproved” scales. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a scale most guitar players are well familiar with, G minor pentatonic (G Bf C D F), as played in third position. <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> illustrates the G blues scale, which is the same as G minor pentatonic but additionally includes the flatted fifth (f5), Df.</p> <p>Most blues players move alternately between minor and major pentatonic scales based on the same root note. Eric Clapton and B.B. King are two great examples of guitarists whose solos are almost always based on a combination of these two scales. <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> illustrates the G major pentatonic scale (G A B D E) in an extended pattern that diagonally traverses the fretboard from third to 12th positions.</p> <p>Duane often used a soloing device that can be traced to B.B. King, one of his biggest influences. King’s signature soloing approach combines the notes of minor and major pentatonic scales in a very specific fretboard pattern, or “shape.” The pattern, known as “B.B.’s box,” is illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 4</strong>. </p> <p>This small handful of notes can be ordered and phrased in nearly an infinite number of ways, resulting in many great blues licks. <strong>FIGURES 5–8</strong> offer four different ways in which Duane would use this shape as a jumping off point to improvised solo ideas.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/1%20to%207.png" width="620" height="615" alt="1 to 7.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20to%20something.png" width="620" height="389" alt="8 to something.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202.png" width="839" height="504" alt="8 part 2.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART ONE OF THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315216001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315216001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><hr /> <p>Now let’s focus on soloing over a 12-bar slow blues form along the lines of “Stormy Monday” and in the style of Duane Allman, as illustrated in <strong>FIGURE 9</strong>. </p> <p>I begin in bars 1 and 2 with a melodic idea based on G major pentatonic, but in bar 3, I morph into G minor pentatonic by overbending the second, A, up and step and a half to the fourth, C. At the end of bar 4 into bar 5, I apply the overbending technique to E, the sixth, bending that note all the way up to the G root note, repeating the melodic motif into bar 6. </p> <p>When performing these bends, line up additional fingers behind the fretting finger—for example, reinforcing the ring finger with the middle finger or both the middle and index—to help it push the string. Doing so will give you better pitch control and stability when bending. The same is true for bend vibratos.</p> <p>Throughout the remainder of the example, I limit my movement to the eighth and 10th positions to demonstrate that a great amount of melodic invention can be found without moving up and down the fretboard. The intent here is to create lines that are expressive and vocal-like while also evoking a bit of the Duane-like focused intensity.</p> <p>For his “Whipping Post” solo, Duane drew primarily from the A Dorian mode (A B C D E Fs G), two fretboard patterns of which are shown in <strong>FIGURES 10 and 11</strong>. Both patterns are very useful for soloing, so you’ll want to memorize them thoroughly.</p> <p><strong>FIGURE 12</strong> offers an eight-bar solo along the lines of Duane’s “Whipping Post” solo. The song is played in 12/8 meter, which affords a lot of room for rhythmic creativity, and Duane made the most of the opportunity every time he played it. I begin this solo with a wholestep bend from the A root up to the second, B, followed by subtle movement down through the notes of the A Dorian mode. </p> <p>In bar 2, I play a quick repeated hammer/pull phrase that emphasizes two notes of a G major triad (G and B) before moving into a line based on A minor pentatonic (A C D E G).</p> <p>Bar 5 offers a unique rhythmic superimposition that Duane used often. Another classic Duane-ism is illustrated in bar 7, as quick pulloffs on the top three strings alternate back and forth in an ascending-and-descending manner.</p> <p>Try using your index and ring fingers to execute this phrase as well as your index and middle fingers and index and pinkie, or a combination of any of these. The aim should be, as always, clarity in execution.</p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/end.png" width="620" height="651" alt="end.png" /></p> <p><strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243315196001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243315196001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART THREE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2243325650001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2243325650001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><img src="/files/imce-images/8%20part%202_0.png" width="620" height="372" alt="8 part 2_0.png" /></p> <fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/duane-allman">Duane Allman</a> </div> <div class="field-item even"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-tribute-musical-genius-and-signature-lead-guitar-style-duane-allman#comments Allman Brothers Band Andy Aledort Duane Allman In Deep May 2013 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Wed, 29 Oct 2014 15:54:36 +0000 Andy Aledort 18091 at http://www.guitarworld.com Sample Guitar World's New 'In Deep with the Major Modes' DVD Featuring Andy Aledort — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/video-sample-guitar-worlds-new-deep-major-modes-dvd-featuring-andy-aledort <!--paging_filter--><p>The latest in Andy Aledort's In Deep instructional DVD series, <em>In Deep with the Major Modes</em> includes more than 100 minutes of instruction! It's available now at the Guitar World Online Store!</p> <p>In this DVD, you'll learn:</p> <p> • Ionian, Lydian and Mixolydian modes.<br /> • Essential fingering patterns and keys.<br /> • How to create licks from scale patterns.<br /> • Major pentatonic and hexatonic scales.<br /> • Blues soloing using thirds and sixths<br /> • Hybrid-dominant scales<br /> ... and much more!</p> <p>Your instructor is <strong>Andy Aledort</strong>, a longtime contributor to <em>Guitar World</em> magazine and the author and producer of hundreds of artist transcriptions, books and instructional DVDs. He has influenced and inspired guitarists around the world for many years. </p> <p>During his tenure at <em>Guitar World</em>, Aledort has written lesson features on players such as Eric Clapton, Eddie Van Halen, Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page, Dimebag Darrell and Yngwie Malmsteen, among others. </p> <p>He also has created many of <em>Guitar World</em>'s best-selling instructional DVDs, including <em>Play Rock Guitar, How to Play Hard Rock and Heavy Metal</em> and <em>How to Play the Jimi Hendrix Experience's Axis: Bold As Love</em>, which can be found at the <a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/?&amp;utm_source=guitarworld.com&amp;utm_medium=secondarynav&amp;utm_campaign=store">Guitar World Online Store.</a></p> <p>As a guitarist, Andy has worked live and in the studio with Jimi Hendrix Experience drummer Mitch Mitchell and the Band of Gypsys rhythm section of bassist Billy Cox and drummer Buddy Miles. Aledort has been a member of original Allman Brothers Band guitarist Dickey Betts' band, Great Southern, and performed with Buddy Guy, Double Trouble, Paul Rodgers and many other legends. His solo blues-rock album, <em>Live at North Star 2009</em>, is available on Steve Vai's Digital Nations label.</p> <p><strong><a href="http://store.guitarworld.com/products/in-deep-with-the-major-modes-dvd/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=daily_scroller&amp;utm_campaign=MajorModesDVD">For more information, visit the Guitar World Online Store</a> and check out the free lesson below!</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2746050936001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2746050936001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/video-sample-guitar-worlds-new-deep-major-modes-dvd-featuring-andy-aledort#comments Andy Aledort Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Features Fri, 17 Oct 2014 15:32:44 +0000 Guitar World Staff 19570 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: The A Mixolydian Mode, Up and Down Each String http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-mixolydian-mode-and-down-each-string <!--paging_filter--><p><em>These videos and audio files are bonus content related to the October 2014 issue of </em>Guitar World<em>. For the full range of interviews, features, tabs and more, pick up the new issue on newsstands now or at the <a href="http://guitarworld.myshopify.com/collections/guitar-world/products/guitar-world-october-14-stevie-ray-vaughan/?&amp;utm_source=gw_homepage&amp;utm_medium=article&amp;utm_campaign=OctoberVideosPage">Guitar World Online Store</a>.</em></p> <p>When jamming, guitarists are always challenged by the task of creating interesting, evolving rhythm parts behind a soloist. </p> <p>In my experiences, I have found the study of modal chord patterns and structures to be tremendously useful in this regard and endlessly interesting. </p> <p>I recently devoted a few columns to the study of building chord shapes, or “grips,” and patterns from modal structures, focusing on two of the most widely used minor modes, Dorian and Aeolian. This month, I’d like to turn your attention to one of the major modes, Mixolydian.</p> <p>The Mixolydian mode is spelled: 1(root) 2 3 4 5 6 f7. It is essentially a major scale with the seventh degree lowered, or “flatted.” </p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3725935018001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3725935018001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-mixolydian-mode-and-down-each-string#comments Andy Aledort In Deep October 2014 Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Tue, 19 Aug 2014 16:52:32 +0000 Andy Aledort 22109 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: How to Create Inventive Rhythm Parts by Connecting Mode-Based Chord Voicings — Video http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-inventive-rhythm-parts-connecting-mode-based-chord-voicings-video <!--paging_filter--><p>Students have often asked how I go about building creative, interesting rhythm parts when playing over a repeating one- or two-chord vamp. </p> <p>As touring guitarist for Great Southern, the group formed by Allman Brothers Band founding guitarist Dickey Betts, I’m required to lay down musical rhythm parts behind extended solos on songs like “Blue Sky” and “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed,” and it’s a challenge to craft supportive rhythm parts that will both enhance the power of the soloing instrument while also locking in with the rhythm section to drive the groove along. </p> <p>This month I’d like to address this worthwhile topic.</p> <p>A technique I often rely on is to take an unusual chord voicing and then move similar voicings up and down the fretboard on the same group of strings. I do this by using a specific mode as the basis for connecting each chord tone in each voicing to the next. To illustrate, I’ll use the A Dorian mode (A B C D E F# G) to formulate improvised, chord-based rhythm parts. <strong>Figure 1</strong> illustrates A Dorian played in third-fifth positions. Play this pattern up and down several times to memorize its structure and become familiar with the mode’s sound and musical quality. <strong>Figures 2</strong> and <strong>3</strong> offer examples of soloing “freely” through A Dorian in these positions, so play through these examples and then try inventing some of your own soloing patterns in different areas of the fretboard.</p> <p>The Dorian mode is spelled intervallically 1 2 b3 4 5 6 b7. It’s essential that you recognize the quality of each interval, or scale degree, as it relates to the root, or tonic. I suggest playing each interval—the second, third, fourth, fifth, and so on—against the low A root note (more on that in a moment).</p> <p><strong>Figure 4</strong> illustrates an unusual Am13sus4 chord voicing that’s based on the A Dorian mode and built from stacked fourths. The voicing is structured by combining a series of notes, each of which is located four scale degrees above the previous one. Starting from A, D is a fourth above A; G is a fourth above D, C is a fourth above G; and F# is an augmented, or “sharped,” fourth above C. We have to use F# instead of F here for the sake of staying true to A Dorian, which is the whole point of the exercise.</p> <p>In order to be able to move chord voicings up and down the fretboard within the parameter of any given mode, it is very helpful to learn how to play the mode up and down the fretboard on each string string. For example, <strong>Figure 5</strong> illustrates A Dorian played up and down the D string. Try playing each of these notes in tandem with the open A string. I suggest you also try playing up and down the string within the structure of A Dorian in a melodic way in order to solidify your understanding of the structure of the mode on that particular string. <strong>Figure 6</strong> shows a descending pattern on the D string to illustrate this point.</p> <p>Now let’s move A Dorian over to the G string, as shown in <strong>Figure 7</strong>. Again, it’s very useful to play each note in this pattern simultaneously with the open A string, as demonstrated in <strong>Figure 8</strong>. Notice that I included articulation devices, like finger slides, to help smoothly connect the notes of the mode as you move along the string.</p> <p><strong>Figure 9</strong> depicts A Dorian played up and down the B string, and <strong>Figure 10</strong> offers an example of playing a symmetrical melodic figure moving down the string. <strong>Figure 11</strong> shows A Dorian played up and down the high E string. Again, try playing the B and high E string patterns against and in conjunction with the open A string pedal tone while memorizing the shapes on each string.</p> <p>Now let’s go back to our stacked-fourths chord voicing of Am13sus4. To create a series of chords based on A Dorian that maintains the stacked-fourth structure, simply move up to each successive scale degree on each string when moving from one chord voicing to the next, as demonstrated in <strong>Figure 12</strong>. When moving from the first chord, Am13sus4, to the second chord, A7sus4, the open D note moves up to the next scale degree of A Dorian, E at the second fret; the open G note moves up one scale degree to A; the C on the B string’s first fret moves up to D at the third fret; and the F# on the first string’s second fret moves up one scale degree, to G at the third fret. This process is then repeated when moving to each higher chord voicing in the series. Some of these voicings may be unfamiliar to you, so take the time necessary to memorize the forms as well as how one changes to the next as you move around on the fretboard.</p> <p>Trying to memorize numerous chord voicings and shapes across the entire fretboard is a tall order and can seem overwhelming. A good way to go about this is to first focus on small areas and particular strings groups. I like to take groups of four consecutive voicings and create repeated rhythm parts. This way, I can study the concept across smaller and very specific areas of the fretboard at one time. <strong>Figures 13-15</strong> offer examples of rhythmically syncopated ideas that are designed to help you to master switching from one stacked-fourth voicing to the next. Once you have the concept down, try starting with a variety of chord voicings based on A Dorian and then move these voicings around the fretboard in the same fashion. There are endless variations to be discovered.</p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3578256640001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3578256640001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-how-create-inventive-rhythm-parts-connecting-mode-based-chord-voicings-video#comments Andy Aledort In Deep July 2014 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Tue, 27 May 2014 12:44:57 +0000 Andy Aledort 21318 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: Unraveling the Mysteries of Chicago and Texas Blues Shuffles, Part 1 http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-unraveling-mysteries-chicago-and-texas-blues-shuffles-part-1 <!--paging_filter--><p><strong>Be sure to check out my new website, <a href="http://www.andyaledort.com/">andyaledort.com</a>, which has all of the latest gig info, gear, lesson (private and Skype), session availability and more!</strong></p> <p>There may be no more an enduring sound that has spanned the long, diverse history of popular music than the blues shuffle. </p> <p> Born from the boogie-woogie sounds of jazz piano in the very early 20th century, the swinging shuffle groove is built from an insistent and repetitive forward-leaning rhythm that is generally written in 12/8 meter—wherein four consecutive beats are each subdivided into three evenly spaced eighth notes—and comprises a repeating quarter-note/eighth-note rhythm that sounds like “da—da, da—da, da—da, da—da.” </p> <p> In this edition of In Deep, we’ll unravel the guitar artistry of three masters of the blues shuffle: Chicago’s Jimmy Reed and Muddy Waters, and Texas’ Lightnin’ Hopkins. </p> <p>The first blues boogie/shuffle to become popular was “Pine Top’s Boogie,” released in 1929 by pianist Pine Top Smith. By the mid Thirties, the boogie rhythm had been adapted to many different styles of music, including the swinging big-band jazz of Benny Goodman, the jump blues of Louis Jordan, hillbilly music and country-and-western swing. But the shuffle rhythm also has origins in the late Twenties recordings of such seminal Delta blues figures as Charlie Patton, Willie Brown and Tommy Johnson. </p> <p> Delta blues pioneer Robert Johnson recorded the classic blues shuffles “Dust My Broom” and “Sweet Home Chicago” in 1936, and shortly thereafter, essential artists such as Son House, Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, Elmore James, John Lee Hooker and Lightnin’ Hopkins developed blues music, and the intricacies of the shuffle rhythm, to a fine art form.</p> <p> Let’s begin with the great Chicago bluesman Jimmy Reed, who penned blues shuffle classics like “Ain’t That Lovin’ You Baby,” “You Don’t Have to Go,” “Bright Lights, Big City,” “Baby What You Want Me to Do” and many others. To say that Reed’s songs have been influential would be a huge understatement. </p> <p> It’s impossible to imagine the blues guitar lexicon without his influential playing style and well-loved, oft-covered songs. Reed often performed with guitarist Eddie Taylor, and the manner in which they played complementary chordal and single-note melodic parts together laid the groundwork for the two-guitar approach later expounded upon in the blues rock of the Yardbirds’ Chris Dreja and Eric Clapton (and, later, Jeff Beck and Jimmy Page), and the Rolling Stones’ Keith Richards and Brian Jones (or Jones’ successors Mick Taylor or Ron Wood). </p> <p> Richards refers to the intertwined sound of the complementary guitars in the Rolling Stones music as, “the fine art of weaving.” Employing a thumb pick and his bare fingers, Reed would use his thumb to lay down driving rhythms on the lower strings while fingerpicking melodic lines on the higher strings. <strong>FIGURE 1</strong> illustrates a rhythm part along the lines of “Baby, What You Want Me to Do,” played in the key of E. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/andy%201.png" width="620" height="676" alt="andy 1.png" /></p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/andy%202.png" width="620" height="307" alt="andy 2.png" /></p> <p> The pickup bar features a rolling double hammer-on on the D string, followed on beat one of bar 1 with an open low E and a trill on the G string to the major third, G#, played simultaneously. Both the trill lick and the rolling double hammer on provide complementary melodic content to the insistent rhythm sounded on the lower strings. In bar 9, B7/A is played by combining B7-type lines with the open A string, yielding an unusual, and signature, effect. Bars 11 and 12 serve as the “turnaround,” with single-note phrases based on the E blue scale (E G A Bb B D) setting up the “V” (five) chord, B7. </p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 2</strong> is based on another Reed hit, “You Don’t Have to Go,” which sounds in the key of F. Reed would move the capo up and down the neck to change keys, which enabled him to play all of his songs in the same manner—as if he were playing in the key of E without a capo (for example, “Bright Lights, Big City” is played with the capo at the fifth fret, sounding in the key of A). Akin to <strong>FIGURE 1</strong>, a repeated melodic pattern is established on the higher strings, alternating against the driving rhythm part on the lower strings.</p> <p> Again, B7/A is used in bar 9, and the turnaround lick in bars 11 and 12 offers a slight twist, setting up a return to the initial lick from bar 1. A complete exploration of Reed’s music is required listening for any aspiring blues guitarist. Also check out the great tribute album, <em>On the Jimmy Reed Highway</em>, recorded by legendary Austin, Texas guitarists Jimmie Vaughan and Omar Kent Dykes in 2011.</p> <p> Texas blues master Lightnin’ Hopkins was a virtuoso guitarist who often performed solo, developing a chord-melody style that greatly influenced blues-rock icons Jimi Hendrix, Johnny Winter, Billy Gibbons and Stevie Ray Vaughan. Like Reed, Hopkins combined fingerpicking with the use of a thumb pick. </p> <p><img src="/files/imce-images/andy%203.png" width="620" height="487" alt="andy 3.png" /><br /> <img src="/files/imce-images/andy%204.png" width="620" height="507" alt="andy 4.png" /></p> <p> <strong>FIGURE 3</strong> is played in the style of his song “Katie Mae,” and throughout, intricate melodic lines on the top three strings dominate the solo guitar performance. To execute these parts, alternate between the thumb and either the index or middle finger (or both used simultaneously). At bar 5, the “IV” (four) chord, A7, includes a simple melodic pattern on the high E string, moving between G at the third fret and the open string. These single note lines are also based on the E blues scale. </p> <p> Muddy Waters, known as the “Father of Chicago Blues,” learned much of his guitar style from listening to Son House and Robert Johnson. He also fingerpicked with a thumb pick, and his initial solo recordings, such as “Feel Like Going Home” and “Rollin’ Stone,” became hits. </p> <p><strong>FIGURE 4</strong>, played in the style of “Rollin’ Stone,” features a consistently alternating low-string/high-string figure, adapted later by Hendrix as the basis for “Voodoo Chile (Slight Return).” Of the four parts illustrated, this is the most complex, so work through each bar slowly and carefully, striving for rhythmic precision and clean articulation.</p> <p><strong>PART ONE</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2888573934001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2888573934001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. 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If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><p><br /><br /> <strong>PART TWO</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience2888611436001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="2888611436001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-unraveling-mysteries-chicago-and-texas-blues-shuffles-part-1#comments Andy Aledort In Deep January 2014 Muddy Waters Videos In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Thu, 15 May 2014 16:23:39 +0000 Andy Aledort 19918 at http://www.guitarworld.com In Deep with Andy Aledort: A Further Exploration of Playing Slide in Open G Tuning http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-further-exploration-playing-slide-open-g-tuning <!--paging_filter--><p>Last month, I presented some techniques, chord forms and licks that are commonly used for playing slide in open G tuning, which is sometimes referred to as “Spanish tuning” or “happy tuning.” </p> <p>This month, I’d like to offer a further investigation into the musical possibilities that open G tuning offers for slide playing. </p> <p>All of the licks and riffs will work great whether you are playing them on a resonator, acoustic or electric guitar, and whether you prefer a glass, metal or ceramic slide. </p> <p><strong>Figure 1</strong> illustrates the most commonly used open G tuning, spelled, low to high, D G D G B D. To tune to open G from standard tuning (E A D G B E), tune your sixth, fifth and first strings down one whole step and leave your fourth, third and second strings where they are. With the guitar tuned this way, strumming across all six open strings will sound an open G major chord, with the fifth, D, being the lowest note.</p> <p>When it comes to the pick hand, most slide guitarists prefer to play with either their bare fingertips, with a thumbpick and fingers, or with a thumbpick and fingerpicks. (The remaining options are to play with a flat pick and bare fingers—what’s known as hybrid picking—or with a flatpick exclusively.) I myself prefer to play slide with my bare fingers, although I will occasionally employ hybrid picking. </p> <p>One of the greatest blues singers, guitarists and composers of all time is Sleepy John Estes, who made his recording debut in 1929 and around that time recorded “The Girl I Love She Got Long Curly Hair.” Ry Cooder brilliantly covered the song under the title “Brownsville” on his eponymous 1970 debut album. In the lyrics, Estes describes returning to rural Brownsville, Tennessee, which remained his hometown until his death in 1977. Estes often recorded with mandolin great Yank Rachell, and on “Brownsville” Cooder approximated Estes’ guitar lick on mandolin, rearranging it with a different melodic pattern. <strong>Figure 2</strong> represents a twist on Cooder’s version by adapting a similar lick for slide guitar. </p> <p>When I begin the lick (bar 1), the upbeat of beat one includes a slide up to B, the major third of G, followed by the open fourth string and then the open third string. On the upbeat of beat two, I slide up to D, the fifth, and follow with a signature descending pattern. This initial idea is recalled in bar 5, but here I rhythmically displace the phrasing by placing the lick that originally fell on the upbeat of “one” in bar 1 over to the upbeat of beat three. This may sound a bit confusing, but the reconfiguring of how and where a signature lick falls within a bar of 4/4 is a staple of “old-style” country, Delta, Chicago and Texas blues, as heard in Howlin’ Wolf’s “Smokestack Lightning” among many other blues classics.</p> <p>Bars 3 and 4 feature a straight rhythm part, played without the slide, that alternates between G5 and G7 chord shapes, à la Robert Johnson’s “Cross Road Blues.” The four chord, C, is sounded in bar 8 by sliding up to the fifth fret and laying the slide across the middle four strings. After a return to the main lick in bar 10, the five chord, D, is alluded to in bar 12 with a simple single-note melodic line performed mostly on the fourth string.<br /> Another old blues classic originally performed in essentially this same tuning scheme is Muddy Waters’ “Rollin’ and Tumblin’.” Muddy recorded the song in open A tuning, which is identical to open G but with each string tuned one whole step higher (low to high, E A E A Cs E). <strong>Figure 3</strong> offers an example played in this style, transposed down to open G tuning for the sake of convenience, beginning with a single-note melody played entirely on the first string. Muddy usually played with a thumbpick, so I prefer to use flatpicking for this example, relying on the pick to accentuate the melodic patterns throughout. </p> <p>Bars 3–6 represent the tune’s signature rhythm pattern, which is built from three bars of 4/4 followed by a single bar of 2/4, and then a return to 4/4 at the change to the four chord, C, in bar 7. The additional bar of 2/4 is utilized throughout the song whenever transitioning from the one chord, G, to either the four chord, C, or the five chord, D. In this example, the C chord is sounded by laying the slide across multiple strings at the fifth fret, and the D chord is likewise formed at the seventh fret. </p> <p>Our final example, <strong>Figure 4</strong>, is inspired by a track Johnny Winter recorded for his 1980 release, <em>Raisin’ Cane</em>, called “Sitting in the Jailhouse,” which he played on electric guitar in open G tuning. This is another great example of leaning on the flatpick to execute specific slide phrases. This example begins with a lick performed by dragging the pick across the top three strings while resting the slide directly above the 12th fret, sounding a sweep-picked G major triad (G B D), followed by a pair of alternating descending phrases. I employ both palm and fret-hand muting in order to make the individual notes of the phrase stand out from one another. Strive for clarity in articulation when executing these phrases. </p> <p>The four chord, C7, is played using a standard root-fifth/root-sixth alternating pattern fretted on the fifth and fourth strings. This technique is also used for the five chord, D7, in bar 13 of the progression. For the turnaround in bar 15, played without the slide, a somewhat wide fret-hand stretch is required to reach the high G root note on the first string’s fifth fret while playing the chromatically descending line on the fourth string. When performing this turnaround, be sure to keep your fret hand relaxed and lift the slide to keep it out of the way. </p> <p><strong>Be sure to check out my brand-new website, <a href="http://www.andyaledort.com/">andyaledort.com</a>, which has all of the latest gig info, gear, lesson (private and Skype), session availability and more!</strong></p> <!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><!-- Start of Brightcove Player --><div style="display:none"> </div> <!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><!-- By use of this code snippet, I agree to the Brightcove Publisher T and C found at https://accounts.brightcove.com/en/terms-and-conditions/. --><script language="JavaScript" type="text/javascript" src="http://admin.brightcove.com/js/BrightcoveExperiences.js"></script><object id="myExperience3385576323001" class="BrightcoveExperience"> <param name="bgcolor" value="#FFFFFF" /> <param name="width" value="620" /> <param name="height" value="348" /> <param name="playerID" value="798983031001" /> <param name="playerKey" value="AQ~~,AAAAj36EdAk~,0qwz1H1Ey92wZ6vLZcchClKTXdFbuP3P" /> <param name="isVid" value="true" /> <param name="isUI" value="true" /> <param name="dynamicStreaming" value="true" /> <param name="@videoPlayer" value="3385576323001" /> </object><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><!-- This script tag will cause the Brightcove Players defined above it to be created as soon as the line is read by the browser. If you wish to have the player instantiated only after the rest of the HTML is processed and the page load is complete, remove the line. --><script type="text/javascript">brightcove.createExperiences();</script><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><!-- End of Brightcove Player --><fieldset class="fieldgroup group-additional-content"><legend>Additional Content</legend><div class="field field-type-nodereference field-field-related-artist"> <div class="field-label"><p><strong>Related Artist:</strong>&nbsp;<p></div> <div class="field-items"> <div class="field-item odd"> <a href="/andy-aledort">Andy Aledort</a> </div> </div> </div> </fieldset> http://www.guitarworld.com/deep-andy-aledort-further-exploration-playing-slide-open-g-tuning#comments Andy Aledort In Deep May 2014 In Deep with Andy Aledort News Lessons Magazine Mon, 07 Apr 2014 15:06:50 +0000 Andy Aledort 20793 at http://www.guitarworld.com